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ORBIS

ORBIS
In the aggregate, our model simulations make it possible to reconfigure conventional maps of the Roman Empire to express the relative cost of transfers from or to a central point as distance. This perspective captures the structural properties of the imperial system as a whole by identifying the relative position of particular elements of the network and illustrating the impact of travel speed and especially transport prices on overall connectivity. Distance cartograms show that due to massive cost differences between aquatic and terrestrial modes of transport, peripheries were far more remote from the center in terms of price than in terms of time. Due to an unexpectedly high volume of traffic to the site, performance of the routing map and interactive cartogram are not what they should be. If you experience delays performing route calculations or rendering the map, you can try refreshing the map by zooming in or out.

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Download 91,000 Historic Maps from the Massive David Rumsey Map Collection Three years ago, we highlighted one of the most comprehensive map collections in existence, the David Rumsey Map Collection, then newly moved to Stanford University. The Rumsey Collection, we wrote then, “contains a seemingly inexhaustible supply of cartographic images”—justifiable hyperbole, considering the amount of time it would take any one person to absorb the over 150,000 physical artifacts Rumsey has amassed in one place. By 2016, Rumsey had made almost half the collection—over 67,000 images—freely available in a digital archive that has been growing since 1996.

Enduring Voices Project, Endangered Languages, Map, Facts, Photos, Videos Explore Talking Dictionaries The Enduring Voices team is pleased to present these Talking Dictionaries, giving listeners around the world a chance to hear some of the most little-known sounds of human speech. Several communities are now offering the online record of their language to be shared by any interested person around the world. Your Life On Rollerblades: Healthier And Better For The Environment More than half of all Americans live within five miles of where they work. But, rather than bike, walk, or take public transportation, the overwhelming majority take cars. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, 77% drove to work alone in 2010, with another 10% roughly going via some sort of carpool. About 5% took public transit.

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Historical maps home page Down to: 6th to 15th Centuries | 16th and 19th Centuries | 1901 to World War Two | 1946 to 21st Century The Ancient World ... index of places Aegean Region, to 300 BCE Aegean Region, 185 BCE Map: Vaccine-Preventable Outbreaks This interactive map visually plots global outbreaks of measles, mumps, whooping cough, polio, rubella, and other diseases that are easily preventable by inexpensive and effective vaccines. Red triangles indicate attacks on vaccinators and healthcare workers, as well as announcements from both governments and non-state actors that have had an impact—either positive or negative—on the successful implementation of vaccination programs. The Global Health Program at the Council on Foreign Relations has been tracking reports by news media, governments, and the global health community on these outbreaks since the fall of 2008. This project aims to promote awareness of a global health problem that is easily preventable, and examine the factors that threaten the success of eradicating preventable illnesses such as polio.

Build a Battery-Free Radio With a Glass Bottle Have you ever built a crystal radio? Have you ever built a battery-free crystal radio? I haven't but this project from MAKE Projects makes me really want to try it out! You need no power source, and can repurpose a glass bottle to do the job! This is a "Featured Project" , which means it "has been found to be exceptionally cool by the MAKE staff" -- and we also find it to be exceptionally cool.

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