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ORBIS

ORBIS
In the aggregate, our model simulations make it possible to reconfigure conventional maps of the Roman Empire to express the relative cost of transfers from or to a central point as distance. This perspective captures the structural properties of the imperial system as a whole by identifying the relative position of particular elements of the network and illustrating the impact of travel speed and especially transport prices on overall connectivity. Distance cartograms show that due to massive cost differences between aquatic and terrestrial modes of transport, peripheries were far more remote from the center in terms of price than in terms of time. Due to an unexpectedly high volume of traffic to the site, performance of the routing map and interactive cartogram are not what they should be. If you experience delays performing route calculations or rendering the map, you can try refreshing the map by zooming in or out.

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Periodis Web - Maps to be Used for the History of Europe Periodis Web - A Historical Atlas and Gazetteer of Europe from Year 1 to 2000 Europe in Year 2000 Europe in Year 1900 Europe in Year 1800 Europe in Year 1700 Europe in Year 1600 What Historians Want from GIS By J. B. "Jack" Owens Blog — Limitless You set a goal- Losing some pounds. Finishing that long paper or finally getting that boring, administrative thing done. You set a deadline - "I AM going to finish this paper in a week." Yet somehow you don't. You do it with much energy for a couple of days and then something comes up - that party, a "short" nap or that crucial football game.

New interactive map of trade in the Roman Empire Article created on Thursday, June 28, 2012 Imagine you’re in Rome, it’s 205 CE, and you’ve got to figure out the quickest way to transport wheat to Virunum. Your transportation choices are limited: ox cart, mule, ship or by foot, and your budget is tight. What do you do?

Home - Classics - LibGuides at Credo Reference Credo LibGuides can be linked to from your institution's webpage. For LibGuides subscribers, these guides may be freely copied and modified to create or supplement your own LibGuides. Learn how to copy a LibGuide. When clicking on the links, your Credo account is accessed by IP authentication or through your institution's proxy server. For help with access issues, contact libguides@credoreference.com Our LibGuides work best for institutions with a Credo Academic Core subscription. Infographics - Own your Information I am a Visual Arts teacher, just so you might start to understand my next comment. I love good Infographics ! I can not think of another technique that condenses the essence of a message down into a more accessible and easily understood medium.

Great Britain Historical Geographical Information System (GBHGIS) The Great Britain Historical Geographical Information System is a unique digital collection of information about Britain's localities as they have changed over time. Information comes from census reports, historical gazetteers, travellers' tales and historic maps assembled into a whole that is much more than the sum of its parts. This site tells you more about the project itself and about historical GIS. Daily Intelligencer Deadlocked SCOTUS Keeps Obama Immigration Initiative Frozen There's no telling how this saga will end. By Ed Kilgore There's no telling how this saga will end. Share Tweet Get smarter news, now. Follow Daily Intelligencer.

CSI: Rome – The Assassination of Julius Caesar CSI: Rome – The Assassination of Julius Caesar Did Julius Caesar know he was going to be assassinated? Was there a single killer or were dozens of men involved? What were the reasons for the assassination? You will answer these and other questions as we look back at one of history’s greatest crimes.

Warburg Institute digital copy antiquities Catalogue Articles You are not logged in | My saved items (0 items) | Login Give Feedback Explore Related Searches Organiser Tools Skip to main content Create interactive lessons using any digital content including wikis with our free sister product TES Teach. Get it on the web or iPad! Historical GIS The AAG Historical GIS Forum provides a digital exchange center for historians, geographers, and other humanities scholars to network with each other and discuss pressing research needs and topics, such as: Challenges facing historical GIS work Best practices in GIS-based historical research Key technical issues and how to resolve them Data consistency and comparability issues Theoretical and conceptual issues in approaches to incorporating geographical data into historical research projects AAG members and non-members alike are encouraged to participate in the Forum.

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