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Weather in the rainforest

Weather in the rainforest
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Layers of the Rainforest By: C.M.Shorter EMERGENT LAYER The Emergent Layer is the highest level of the Rainforest. Giant trees reach to the sky. It is not uncommon for the hardwood evergreens and broad-leaf Rainforest trees to reach an amazing 180 to 200’ in height. CANOPY LAYER The Canopy Layer is found directly beneath the Emergent Layer. Many Epiphytic Plants, commonly called “air plants” like Bromeliads and Orchids grow in the Canopy Layer. UNDERSTORY LAYERThe Understory Layer is directly underneath the Canopy Layer and on top of the Forest Floor. FOREST FLOOR The Forest Floor is the ground layer. << Back to Amazon Rainforest Next: Rainforest Territory of the World >> -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Also: Bio-Prospecting in the Rainforest | People of the Amazon Rainforest

Avarage Weather The tropical rain forest is a forest of tall trees in a region of year-round warmth. An average of 50 to 260 inches (125 to 660 cm.) of rain falls yearly. Rain forests belong to the tropical wet climate group. The temperature in a rain forest rarely gets higher than 93 °F (34 °C) or drops below 68 °F (20 °C); average humidity is between 77 and 88%; rainfall is often more than 100 inches a year. There is usually a brief season of less rain. Rainforests now cover less than 6% of Earth's land surface. A tropical rain forest has more kinds of trees than any other area in the world. About 1/4 of all the medicines we use come from rainforest plants. All tropical rain forests resemble one another in some ways. Despite these differences, each of the three largest rainforests--the American, the African, and the Asian--has a different group of animal and plant species. Layers of the Rainforest There are four very distinct layers of trees in a tropical rain forest. Plant Life Animal Life

Ten Amazing Rainforest Plants Our surroundings are sometimes taken for granted. Even something as unique as the rainforest is forgotten. It seems a little bit of knowledge and a shove in the right direction can get people to appreciate the environment. So, why not start with the wonder that is the rainforest? Even though rainforests only cover less than two percent of the Earth’s entire surface area, they are home to 50 percent of the plants and animals. You’re probably thinking “I know all there is to know about bananas; I eat them for breakfast and can make delicious banana bread.” Habitation: Found in Central America, South America, Africa, Southeast Asia and non-tropical regions like the United States thanks to modern agricultural technologies. Known for their beauty, orchids are the largest family of plants in the world. Habitation: Extremely adaptable and grows in most climates with the majority being found in Central America, South America and in countries along the Andes Mountains.

Tropical Rain Forest As you can see from the map to the right, the tropical rainforests are, indeed, located in the tropics, a band around the equator from 23.5 N (the Tropic of Cancer) to 23.5 S (the Tropic of Capricorn) (red lines on map, right). Because the Earth tilts 23.5 degrees on its axis as it travels around the sun, at some point in the year (the solstices, June 22nd in the north, December 22nd in the south) the sun will be directly overhead on one of these lines. At the equinoxes the sun is directly over the equator. Within this band, solar radiation is most intense, and thus the surface of the planet warms the most. Not all of the land in the tropics is tropical rainforest. {*style:<a href=''>*}{*style:</a>*}Another biome similar to the tropical rain forest is the{*style:<b>*} cloud forest.

climate. A tropical rainforest is an ecosystem type that occurs roughly within the latitudes 28 degrees north or south of the equator (in the equatorial zone between the Tropic of Cancer and Tropic of Capricorn). This ecosystem experiences high average temperatures and a significant amount of rainfall. Rainforests can be found in Asia, Australia, Africa, South America, Central America, Mexico and on many of the Pacific, Caribbean, and Indian Ocean islands. Overview Tropical rainforests can be characterized in two words: warm and wet. Tropical rainforests are among the most threatened ecosystems globally due to large-scale fragmentation due to human activity. History Tropical rainforests have existed on Earth for hundreds of millions of years. Types of tropical rainforest Several types of forest comprise the general tropical rainforest biome: Lowland equatorial evergreen rain forests are forests which receive high rainfall (more than 2000 mm, or 80 inches, annually) throughout the year. Forest floor

Landforms in Tropical Rainforests The tropical rainforests are characterized by a variety of landforms and which give rise to a complex ecosystem in this region. The tropical rainforests are found in lowland regions. Topographical features of the rainforest regions include the mountains, valleys, streams, wetlands, rivers, etc. Major Landforms in Tropical Rainforests The tropical rainforest biome is amongst the important ones on this planet. Mountain A mountain is a topographical feature that rises above surrounding areas and has an altitude higher than a hill. Valley A valley, is also referred to as dale. Wetland The soil of wetlands is saturated with water. Stream Description of the stream can be presented as water current that flows through a path called bed. Flood Plain It is a flat and vast area present adjacent to rivers or streams. River A stream and river is differentiated on the basis of their size. The different landforms of tropical rainforests give rise to a complex ecosystem with varied species.

Cold Tempetures Updated January 11, 2009 A rainforest is a forest differentiated by high levels of precipitation - normally a minimum of at least 68-78 inches (172-198 cm) annually. Rainforests tend to have fairly mild and/or warm climates and feature the highest levels of biodiversity in the world. Locations and Types of Rainforests Within the rainforest biome, there are two specific types of rainforest. Temperate rainforests have mild climates with cool, wet winters. The second and most widespread type of rainforest is a tropical rainforest. Tropical rainforests form in these locations because they are within the ITCZ, which provides the warm temperatures common in the forests. Rainforest Vegetation and Structure Within rainforests, there are four different layers with various plants that have adapted to life in that layer. The next layer is the canopy layer and contains the majority of the rainforest's tallest trees. The next layer is the understory. The final rainforest layer is the forest floor.

Fact sheet: Tropical Rainforest Animals Where can you find an antelope the size of a rabbit, a snake that can fly, or a spider that eats birds? All in tropical rainforests, of course! Tropical rainforests are home to the largest and the smallest, the loudest and the quietest of all land animals, as well as some of the most dangerous, most beautiful, most endearing and strangest looking animals on earth. Q: Why do more animal species live in the rainforest than other parts of the world? A: Scientists believe that there is a great diversity of animals because rainforests are the oldest ecosystems on earth. The nearly perfect conditions for life also helped contribute to the great number of species. Some rainforest species have populations that number in the millions. Q: Which type of rainforest species is most numerous? A: If you were to visit a rainforest, you probably wouldn't run into many jaguars or monkeys. Scientists estimate that there are more than 50 million different species of invertebrates living in rainforests.

The average temperature in the rainforest is about 30C, 80F it changer very l... Tropical Rainforest The rainforest that we have chosen to do our project on is in and is called the Amazon Rainforest. You can see on the picture in the upper left corner that the Amazon is the dark green area on the map. This zone which covers much of the northern half of that is east of the and north of the which centers at the equator. It extends through large parts of . This biome is surrounded by dry forests and savannas. In an average year in a tropical rainforest, the climate is very humid do to all of the rain which amounts to about 250cm per year. The climate is found near the equator. 40o F. This is red fungus (Pycnoporus sanguineus) these would be classified in the Fungi kingdom. This is white fungus (Lentinus) and it would be classified in the Fungi kingdom. This is the fern leaf. This is the Cattleya Plant. This is the Toco Toucan. This is the vampire bat. This is Euglena. This is an Actinopod. Howler Monkey The howler monkey is the loudest monkey in the rainforest. 1. 2.

The Plants of the Rainforest A tropical greenhouse More than two thirds of the world's plant species are found in the tropical rainforests: plants that provide shelter and food for rainforest animals as well as taking part in the gas exchanges which provide much of the world's oxygen supply. Rainforest plants live in a warm humid environment that allows an enormous variation rare in more temperate climates: some like the orchids have beautiful flowers adapted to attract the profusion of forest insects. Competition at ground level for light and food has lead to evolution of plants which live on the branches of other plants, or even strangle large trees to fight for survival. The aerial plants often gather nourishment from the air itself using so-called 'air roots';.

Saving Forests Page Content These nature-based initiatives aid in global mitigation efforts by preserving or restoring standing forests, which absorb massive amounts of carbon from the atmosphere.[Click to enlarge & view our slideshow] Protecting forests has always been central to CI's mission. Human activity is the main cause of deforestation, usually tied to economic development, increasing consumption rates – in both developed and developing countries – and extractive industries such as logging. Pristine jungles are burned and cleared for farming and ranching, or for plantations to produce biofuel crops. Science in Action: Putting out Fires The loss is irreplaceable. Forests also are important ecosystems in the balance of nature, providing a multitude of resources and services essential to all people. In addition, burning and clearing forests emits approximately 16 percent of the greenhouse gases that cause climate change, more than all the world's cars, trucks, and airplanes combined.

Cool Trees A giant in the rainforests, the kapok tree can reach up to 200 feet in height, sometimes growing as much as 13 feet per year. Due to its extreme height, the kapok, or ceiba tree, towers over the other rainforest vegetation. The trunk can expand to nine or 10 feet in diameter. In the nooks and grooves of this huge plant live a diverse number of species including frogs, birds and bromeliads. The kapok tree is deciduous, shedding all of its leaves during the dry season. As its seeds are easily blown into open areas, kapok trees are some of the first to colonize open areas in the forest.

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