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9/11 Truth: Why Do Good People Become Silent—or Worse—About 9/11? | Global Research - Centre for Research on Globalization AE9/11 Truth Editor’s Note: Frances Shure, M.A., L.P.C., has performed an in-depth analysis addressing a key issue of our time: “Why Do Good People Become Silent — or Worse — About 9/11?” The resulting essay, being presented here as a series, is a synthesis of both academic research and clinical observations. In answering the question in the title of this essay, the January 2015 segment — Learned Helplessness — reported on the conditioned responses of utter helplessness and hopelessness resulting from ongoing painful trauma or adversity that involves actual or perceived lack of control. Here, in the March 2015 installment [there was no February installment, because the January piece appeared in the February newsletter], we continue Ms. Shure’s analysis with Part 15: The Abuse Syndrome. A dynamic that may help explain the “nothing we can do about it” reaction to the evidence that refutes the official 9/11 account is the “abuse syndrome,” as described by clinical psychologist Bruce E. Dr.

at the start - THERE WAS NO RUBBLE and very few Why Do Good People Become Silent—or Worse—About 9/11? Part 12: Signal Detection Theory © by Frances T. Shure, 2014 Editor’s Note: Frances Shure, M.A., L.P.C., has performed an in-depth analysis addressing a key issue of our time: “Why Do Good People Become Silent—or Worse—About 9/11?” In answering the question in the title of this essay, the two October segments — Part 10: Terror Management Theory, and Part 11: Systems Justification Theory — examined, respectively, how the fear of our own death, and the need to feel good about the cultural system in which we live, can create resistance to the evidence indicating that the official story about 9/11 is a lie. We continue Ms. The study of how acutely individuals discriminate when making decisions, including psychological factors that bias those decisions, has resulted in the Signal Detection Theory.1 Nearly all human decisions are made in an environment of uncertainty. Example: You are looking for a person (signal) in a crowded room. Let's assume you're a believer in the official 9/11 story.

1,140 WTC 9/11 responders have cancer — and doctors say that number will grow Julia Xanthos/New York Daily News NYPD Detective Amadeo Pulley, left, was among the first World Trade Center responders to get cancer as a result to exposure to toxins at Ground Zero in 2001. Practice Nurse Navigator Tina Engel and Dr. Leigh Wilson are pictured with him at the North Shore Hospital /LIJ WTC Health Center in Queens, N.Y. The “C” word has been every World Trade Center responder’s nightmare — and for good reason. Cancer has become a reality for more than 1,000 men and women who sacrificed their health at Ground Zero — and the number is expected to grow. “You get a lump in your throat when you first have to tell your wife,” said NYPD Detective Amadeo Pulley, 47, who was diagnosed with kidney cancer in May. As New York and the nation approach the 12th anniversary of the terrorist attack, a Mount Sinai Medical Center study found a 15% higher cancer rate among 9/11 responders than among people not exposed to the Ground Zero toxins. As for Detective Pulley, Dr.

World Trade Center Building 7 Demolished on 9/11? - Why Do Good People Become Silent—or Worse—About 9/11? P13 Editor's Note: Frances Shure, M.A., L.P.C., has performed an in-depth analysis addressing a key issue of our time: "Why Do Good People Become Silent — or Worse — About 9/11?" The resulting essay, being presented here as a series, is a synthesis of both academic research and clinical observations. © by Frances T. "Make It Readable" button in right side bar >> In answering the question in the title of this essay, the November segment — Signal Detection Theory — examined how the "signal" of 9/11 Truth can be drowned out by excessive "noise" that comes from our information-overloaded world, our prior beliefs, and our psychological state of being. Here, in the December installment, we continue Ms. People with prior knowledge of corporate and governmental malfeasance, but especially of State Crimes Against Democracy (SCADs), have an increased capacity to accept evidence that contradicts the official 9/11 conspiracy theory. Scott defines "deep state" more specifically: ~ Peter Dale Scott [15] Ibid.

Why Do Good People Become Silent—or Worse—About 9/11? Part 10: Terror Management Theory and Part 11: Systems Justification Theory © by Frances T. Editor’s Note: Frances Shure, M.A., L.P.C., has performed an in-depth analysis addressing a key issue of our time: “Why Do Good People Become Silent—or Worse—About 9/11?” In answering the question in the title of this essay, the August segment, Part 9, reported on the interface between brain research and the study of moral psychology, and how this research demonstrates that some moral convictions are innate and thus hardwired in the human nervous system. We continue Ms. Terror Management Theory postulates that whenever we are introduced to information that reminds us of death — such as simply the mention of 9/11 — our anxiety increases, since we are reminded of our own inevitable death. Therefore, when we skeptics try to educate people about 9/11, we provoke anxiety in our listeners since, unconsciously, we are reminding them of their own death. All truth passes through three stages. 1Zakary L.

Why Do Good People Become Silent—or Worse—About 9/11? Editor’s Note: Frances Shure, M.A., L.P.C., has performed an in-depth analysis addressing a key issue of our time: “Why Do Good People Become Silent—or Worse—About 9/11?” The resulting essay, being presented here as a series, is a synthesis of both academic research and clinical observations. In answering the question in the title of this essay, last month’s segment, Part 8, reported on some of the brain research that shows we humans have differences in our brain structures, and these differences help explain why some of us are more open to new ideas and can handle ambiguity better than others. Additionally, the research, which demonstrates the brain’s tenacious hold on belief, despite contrary evidence, helps us understand why the task of educating people about 9/11 becomes as much psychological as it is evidence-based. We continue Ms. How do we acquire our values and our morals? What keeps people from doing the right thing? This is a moral issue. 1) Morality means Fairness 3Ibid. 4Ibid.

Why Do Good People Become Silent—or Worse—About 9/11? Editor's Note: Frances Shure, M.A., L.P.C., has performed an in-depth analysis addressing a key issue of our time: "Why Do Good People Become Silent—or Worse—About 9/11?" The resulting essay, being presented here as a series, is a synthesis of both academic research and clinical observations. In answering the question in the title of this essay, last month's segment, Part 7, examined groupthink, a maladaptive manifestation of conformity in which the desire for unity by the group members results in an incorrect or deviant decision-making outcome, an inflated sense of certainty in decisions by the "in-group," and often irrational and dehumanizing actions toward an "out-group." We continue Ms. Perhaps. An August 2004 Zogby poll revealed that nearly half of New York City residents and 41% of New York state citizens believed that some of our leaders knew in advance that the attacks were planned on or around September 11, 2001, and that they consciously failed to act. 2Amie Ninh, "Liberal vs.

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