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8 must-reads detail how to verify information in real-time, from social media, users

8 must-reads detail how to verify information in real-time, from social media, users
Over the past couple of years, I’ve been trying to collect every good piece of writing and advice about verifying social media content and other types of information that flow across networks. This form of verification involves some new tools and techniques, and requires a basic understanding of the way networks operate and how people use them. It also requires many of the so-called old school values and techniques that have been around for a while: being skeptical, asking questions, tracking down high quality sources, exercising restraint, collaborating and communicating with team members. For example, lots of people talk about how Andy Carvin does crowdsourced verification and turns his Twitter feed into a real time newswire. Some things never go out of style. At the same time, there are new tools, techniques and approaches every journalist should have in their arsenal. From the post: So, already you have three must view links about verification (1,2,3). Verification must reads 4. 5. 6. Related:  Evaluation Skills

model lesson 1 ready-to-go mini lesson LESSON 1 "Think Aloud" Demonstration Time: 10-15 minutes as follows: 5 minutes think aloud 5 minutes search as individuals 5 minutes collect findings Materials: computers, one with a projector whiteboard or Red Flag Chart It may be helpful to create a Red Flag Chart with three columns: Accused | Suspicious | Acquited (or similar terms). Think Aloud This lesson takes place in the context of a science course where DNA, genetics and "designer babies" is the topic. Among results for "designer babies" is this Genochoice.com Use this site to demonstrate how an investigative searcher might approach the material. Click this and point out information about the credits: Virgil Wong. Start a list of things you find out about Virgil Wong. After five minutes, call an end to searching and begin to collect information from the students. Among the findings possible, he is: Back to Model Lessons

Evaluating Web Pages: Techniques to Apply & Questions to Ask 1. What can the URL tell you? Techniques for Web Evaluation : 1. 2. 2. 1. INSTRUCTIONS for Truncating back a URL: In the top Location Box, delete the end characters of the URL stopping just before each / (leave the slash). Continue this process, one slash (/) at a time, until you reach the first single / which is preceded by the domain name portion. 3. Check the date on all the pages on the site. 3. 1. What kinds of publications or sites are they? Are they real? 3. Expect a journal article, newspaper article, and some other publications that are recent to come from the original publisher IF the publication is available on the web. Look at the bottom of such articles for copyright information or permissions to reproduce. 4. 1. a. Type or paste the URL into alexa.com's search box. b. 1. The pages listed all contain one or more links to the page you are looking for. If you find no links, try a shorter portion of the URL, stopping after each /. 2. 5. 1. 2. WHY? More About Evaluating Web Sources

Comparing & Evaluating Web Information Sources From Now On The Educational Technology Journal Vol 6|No 9|June|1997 Comparing & Evaluating Web Information Sources A major challenge in a time of Info-Glut and Info-Garbage is evaluation of information sources.Before basing a decision on the information available, wise researchers (and students) will give thought to the following criteria: reliability - definition | accuracy - definition | authority - definition currency - definition fairness - definition adequacy - definition efficiency - definition | organization - definition Staff and students need to learn to apply these concepts critically to the sites they are visiting so they become thoughtful and discerning information consumers. Using a table as a "visual organizer" often helps focus the evaluation of sources. **** Excellent *** Good ** Satisfactory * Weak References For additional information and resources to support the development of Web site evaluation skills, visit the following sites:

Checklist for Evaluating Web Resources | University of Southern Maine Is the Web a good research tool? This question is dependent on the researcher's objective. As in traditional print resources one must use a method of critical analysis to determine its value. Here is a checklist for evaluating web resources to help in that determination. Authority: Is the information reliable? Check the author's credentials and affiliation. Does the resource have a reputable organization or expert behind it? Are the sources of information stated? Can the author be contacted for clarification? Check for organizational or author biases. Scope: Is the material at this site useful, unique, accurate or is it derivative, repetitious, or doubtful? Is the information available in other formats? Is the purpose of the resource clearly stated? What items are included in the resource? Is the information factual or opinion? Does the site contain original information or simply links? How frequently is the resource updated? Does the site have clear and obvious pointers to new content? Other Tips:

Teaher's Guide to Information Crap Detection Information overload, information crap,information pollution...are some of the words that are being used now to describe the tsunami of irrelevant information we are bombarded with day and night.In December 2009, Google began customizing its search results for all users, and we entered a new era of personalization. With little notice or fanfare, our online experience is changing, as the websites we visit are increasingly tailoring themselves to us.Everywhere you turn you find information that seems relevant to you but in fact is nothing but crap. This is probably why Eli Pariser recommended what he called Information Bubble. Howard Rheingold is another guy who has done a lot of writings on Information Crap. I have already reviewed his awesome book Net Smart: How to Thrive Online in an article posted last year. 2- Internet Detective This is another great resource full of lessons, tutorials on how to teach your students to be good consumers of online information. 4- Crap Test 5- Video

Evaluating internet information | University Libraries | Virginia Tech Information comes to us from a wide variety of sources. Can you tell good information from bad? MajesticSEO's Fresh Index estimates that there are almost 700 billion web pages out there and that search engines cover less than 1/4 of that! (what percent of this do you think will be QUALITY, USEFUL information?) Here are some things to remember when you use the Web: ANYONE can publish on the Web! We offer you the following information for use when looking for quality information on the Web. Credits: modified with permission from Susan Beck, The Good, The Bad & The Ugly: or, Why It's a Good Idea to Evaluate Web Sources Evaluation Criteria

The 5 Elements Students Should Look For When Evaluating Web Content March , 2014 In a section in her wonderful book "Understanding The Social Lives of Networked Teens" Danah Boyd talked extensively about the concept of digital natives and argued that this nomenclature does not really capture the essence of what a digitally savvy teenager really means. Dana argued that the mere fact of being comfortable with a social media tool does not prove that the user has a digital fluency to allow them to better use it for educational purposes : Just because teens are comfortable using social media to hang out does not mean that they’re fluent in or with technology. Learning how to evaluate online content is an essential step in the process of developing digitally literate students. Watch this short introduction to CRAAP Currency: Is the information too old.

Digital Credibility: 13 Lessons For the Google Generation - 13 Digital Research Tools And The Credibility Lessons They Teach by TeachThought Staff This post is promoted by Noet, makers of Encyclopedia Britannica Noet Edition and the free research app for the classics, who asked us to talk about the credibility of information research in a digital world. We thought, then, that it might make sense to focus on digital tools and resources that highlight the idea of credibility. And because credibility and research are such important digital concepts–or really, data and thinking concepts, actually–we itemized each tool as lesson in and of itself. The Google Generation has a universe of information, right there on a little pinch-and-zoom screen. Further, “by ignoring the phases of inquiry learning, premature Googlers often find what they want rather than what they might need. This doesn’t make digital research better or worse, but rather different. Lesson 1: Not all sources are created equal. Lesson 2: Access matters–so improve it.

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