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Six Steps for Planning a Successful Project

Six Steps for Planning a Successful Project
Sure, King Middle School has some amazing projects, but the Portland school has been refining its expeditionary learning projects for nearly two decades. David Grant, who guides the school's technology integration and curriculum development, has put together a six-step rubric for designing a project. He says Fading Footprints, which became a model for King and Expeditionary Learning Schools, doesn't take an entire school, or even a team of twelve, to plan and carry out; one or two teachers can tailor this one to fit their time and resources. Six Steps to Planning a Project The Fading Footsteps project is a twelve-week interdisciplinary ecology unit centered around the guiding question: How does diversity strengthen an ecosystem? Using this project as an example, see how King Middle School creates an action plan around each step. How they do it: The 1-to-1 laptop program was a bonus when it came to creating a comprehensive final product. Step 5: Coordinate calendars.

http://www.edutopia.org/stw-maine-project-based-learning-six-steps-planning

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Project Based Learning Resources (image from education-world.com) Project Based Learning (PBL) is a great way to teach students content, 21st century skills, and engage them in something fun and educational. I spoke more about PBL in an earlier blog ( and we had some great reader comments (Tech&Learning, May 2009, page 14). Today I'd like to give some tips and ideas on how to get started with PBL in your classroom. First of all, PBL can be used in any classroom, in any subject, at any grade level. Projects can be one class period, or take weeks to complete.

Project-Based Learning Idea: Students Create Their Own Viral Video I am continuously inspired by the increasing number of shared video content which let’s face it, in this digital age, we can’t really avoid. The sharing and re-sharing of videos via email and through Facebook and Twitter have undoubtedly given rise to the phenomenon of these ‘viral’ videos. It goes without saying that shared video content is more popular than ever before, with more than 48 hours worth of video being uploaded to YouTube every single minute.

Using Google Classroom to Support PBL Project Based Learning has been a revelation for me. It is the first instructional “plate” I have encountered that simultaneously blends significant content and 21st century skills, and meets my teaching philosophy. I have come to believe however, that utilizing the PBL “plate” with my sixth graders is akin to going through a buffet line at your favorite restaurant. Without a predetermined method of organization, your food (or instructional) choices run together into a cluttered mess impossible to separate. I knew I needed to find a way to organize my project into a singular entity that did not cause my appetizer (entry event), main course (significant content) and dessert (final presentations) to become confusing and inaccessible for kids. Over the past few years I have experimented with several learning management systems in an effort to find the best method of organizing information for students that is quick, simple, and intuitive to use.

Personalized PBL: Student-Designed Learning I wrote a blog about one of the pitfalls of personalization for the ASCD Whole Child Blog. Specifically, that pitfall is the lack of engagement. With all the focus on personalization through time, pacing, and place, it can be easy to forget about the importance of engagement. No matter where students learn, when they learn, and the timing of the learning, engagement drives them to learn. Flexible Seating and Student-Centered Classroom Redesign I remember exactly where I was when I had a watershed moment that changed me as a teacher forever. In fact, it inspired my EdSurge column, Why the 21st-Century Classroom May Remind You of Starbucks. I was working on my TEDx presentation at my local Starbucks and, looking around, I realized that everyone seemed to be happy, engaged in their work, and relaxed.

12 Timeless Project-Based Learning Resources 12 Timeless Project-Based Learning Resources by Shannon Dauphin Project-based learning is becoming increasingly popular as teachers look for a way to make lessons stick in the minds of their students. According to Edutopia, studies have shown that students who use project-based learning remember the material much longer and have healthier attitudes toward education. Project-based learning is based on the idea that students learn best by tackling and solving real world problems.

How to Make Your Classroom a Thinking Space Editor's note: The following is an excerpt from Thinking Through Project-Based Learning: Guiding Deeper Inquiry by Jane Krauss and Suzie Boss. It was published this month by Corwin. Take a moment and imagine a creative work environment. Don't worry about the kind of work going on. Just focus on the space. Close your eyes and picture it. 3 Types Of Project-Based Learning Symbolize Its Evolution Project-Based Learning is an increasingly popular trend in the 21st century. The best evidence for this popularity might be the nuance it’s taken on. Project-Based Learning has gone from academic study that yields end-of-unit projects, to highly complex methods of creating and publishing student thinking.

Turn Your Classroom into a Workshop to Engage Learners If you think a classroom bereft of traditional tools like homework, bell work, worksheets and even grades sounds intriguing, you are ready to convert your classroom into a workshop setting, where learning will really soar. Say Goodbye to Order Order means control. There is no room for control in a dynamic workshop setting. When I created my first Results Only Learning Environment, desks were gathered in small groups. Bookcases lined the walls, and student work was taped or stapled in no particular order from one corner to the next. In the first year, five computers were nestled snugly against one wall, and one or two carts were stationed near the center, holding student note books, paperbacks or art supplies we used for projects.

Free K - 12 Common Core Lesson Plans and Ideas Common Core Math Kindergarten Counting & Cardinality Operations & Algebraic Thinking Number & Operations in Base Ten Research-Supported PBL Practices At one New Tech Network high school, strategies backed by research make project-based learning effective and engaging for teachers and students. At Manor New Technology High School in Manor, Texas, several research-based practices interact to promote successful inquiry-based learning: Manor New Tech is part of the New Tech Network, a nonprofit that works with schools and districts around the country providing services and support to help reform learning through project-based learning (PBL). Since opening its doors in fall 2007, the school has achieved several notable accomplishments: It has graduated two classes with an average annual graduation rate of 98 percent. All 39 students in the first senior class graduated, and 95 percent of the 74 students in the class of 2011 graduated.

Project Based Learning and iPads/iPods Introducing an irresistible project at the beginning of a unit of study can give students a clear and meaningful reason for learning. Plus, they end up with a product or result that could possibility make a difference in the world! In project based learning students are driven to learn content and skills for an authentic purpose.

How to Reinvent Project Based Learning to Be More Meaningful By Thom Markham This is a crucial time for education. Every system in every country is in the process of figuring out how to reboot education to teach skills, application, and attitude in addition to recall and understanding. Helping students be able to grapple with increased problem solving and inquiry, be better critical and creative thinkers, show greater independence and engagement, and exhibit skills as presenters and collaborators is the challenge of the moment. That’s why so many educators are using the project based learning (PBL) model.

This website provides insight to the process behind project-based learning, specifically for middle schoolers. There are six steps to this particular process, each of which defines a necessary step towards the project's success. This site does very well in defining the core ideas behind a successful project. Of course, other aspects could be added to the process, thus creating more steps. Yet, the basic approach is still very effective. by markalex Apr 15

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