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The Stupid Things You Do in the Kitchen (and How to Fix Them)

The Stupid Things You Do in the Kitchen (and How to Fix Them)
Love cooking or hate it, much of your time in the kitchen is likely wasted by easily correctable mistakes you probably don't even know you're making. You waste time prepping ingredients, use your knives incorrectly, mix and match the wrong utensils, and throw out food that's still good—and those are just a few of the stupid things you do in the kitchen. Here's how to fix them. P Stupid Thing #1: You Spend Too Much Time Prepping IngredientsP Few people enjoy the tedium of prepping ingredients. Say you're cutting a bunch of carrots into sticks; it doesn't make sense to trim, peel, and slice each one individually. It also helps to use two bowls—one for scraps and one for cleaning—so you don't make a mess during the preparation process. These are all great ways to save you time and keep you organized, but a few common ingredients have tricks all their own. Stupid Thing #2: You Use Your Knives WrongP The easiest issue to correct is a dull blade, and it's one of the most important. Related:  Lifehacker Cooking

Top 10 Crazy Kitchen Tricks That Speed Up Your Cooking I would like to add that the wider the ring, the easier it seems to be. I had a titanium ring more than twice the width of the one shown in the video and it was easy as hell. My wedding ring (which is about the same size as the one in your linked video) still works, but takes more effort and can hurt if I don't leverage it JUST right. I would also like to echo the sentiments of not using your wedding ring (At least in view of your significant other). The one time I got caught doing it, my wife was PISSED. Yea, definitely the wider the ring the better. I usually just use another bottle of unopened beer.

You're the Guinea Pig: Experimenting with Your Sleep and Dreams I have about 30 sleep apps on my iPhone. It's become a hobby, testing them all out. I am a hospice CNA and a full-time nursing student, so sleep is vital, unfortunately I also have pretty bad insomnia. The best apps I have found for good sleep are the TESLA entrainment apps (Tesla is the company, if you search in the app store. The DREAM:ON experience I had was very similar to the one described. The SLEEP CYCLE app is really nice. There are other "sleep sounds" type apps that I have downloaded. NIGHTSTAND is another app. Hope this helps!

80 Healthy Recipe Substitutions Here at Greatist, we're always looking for ways to make our favorite foods healthier without sacrificing flavor. So we compiled a list of our best substitutions and discovered some new ones along the way. Below are our 83 (!) top picks, guaranteed to make that next meal a delicious, healthier hit. It wasn't easy taste-testing all this food, but someone sure had to. Baking hacks 1. Swapping out flour for a can of black beans (drained and rinsed, of course) in brownies is a great way to cut out the gluten and fit in an extra dose of protein, Plus, they taste great. 2. In virtually any baked good, replacing white flour with whole wheat can add a whole new dimension of nutrients, flavor, and texture. 3. Using applesauce in place of sugar can give the necessary sweetness without the extra calories and, well, sugar. 4. Don’t knock this one till you’ve tried it. 5. This gluten-free switch gives any baked good a dose of protein, omega-3s, and a delicious nutty flavor. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12.

What 'Brain Food' Actually Does for Your Brain "it's just a chemical dosage that goes from your mouth to your brain" - sorry, but that is completely misleading, and in an article purporting to explain how food interacts with the brain, is downright false. It also ignores information given by the sources you actually quote. Neurotransmitters, with a few exceptions, are composed of protein-like molecules which are digested and absorbed by the gut like any other protein. The most basic knowledge of nutrition would tell you that foodstuffs are rendered down into absorbable monomers by acids and enzymes while they are still in the gut - i.e. outside the body. Even then, to enter the brain it's necessary to pass through another, more stringent selection system. This is why drug design for the nervous system is difficult - the drugs have to be either similar to a transported substance, and hence carried across, or fat soluble in order to bypass the barrier.

Plan Your Weekly Meals, Stress Free I've been planning my recipes and doing my shopping for the week ahead for years now. Awesome idea. One thing I've learned - you just cant set meals for specific days. Even choosing tomorrows meal is a bit wonky. I used to try at first, but there are just way too many things that crop up to stop you - meeting a mate for a drink after work, small (or missed) lunch so you're starving when you get home and your meal takes an hour to make, 'accidentally' snacking mid-afternoon so not hungry when you get home, delayed journeys, too tired when you get in to start faffing around with big recipes. Its a nice idea but for me, no. What works for me is just to have a list of meals, and to make sure that you have some that are quicker and/or easier than others. Even better, make sure that at least one of them is a store cupboard dinner - i.e. most of the things come out of tins or packets. By the way, let me recommend this book as the daddy of all midweek cooking books for lifehackers.

You May Be Able to Actually Make Yourself Smarter—All It Takes Is Practice I totally agree, but don't think that wikipedia-surfing is a good example, because you search for stuff that you want to know (or maybe easier to understand) while when reading a scrience book f.e. you have to read all the way through the article, even if some parts are harder to understand I tend to agree as well, but I've found that as someone who strives to learn almost to the exclusion of all else in my life, when that learning is severely depressed by any of a variety of factors, I'm encouraged to drink. Maybe dumb people don't 'not care,' but they're just not as capable of learning, and lack to means of acquiring the necessary facilitation to expand their minds. But yes, the desire, the motivation is a key factor in anything.

How to Break Your Bad Cooking Habits Find out what 4 bad cooking habits you should break Have you ever done this? You find an awesome recipe with a beautiful picture. Here are 4 bad cooking habits you should try to break. —Hilary Meyer, EatingWell Associate Food Editor Bad habit #1: You dip and sweep the flour » EatingWell: 10 Bad Cooking Habits You Should Break By Hilary Meyer, Associate Food Editor, EatingWell Magazine Some habits can be tough to break. When it comes to cooking, you may have some bad habits that you’re not even aware of. Some may be keeping your meal just short of reaching perfection while others may actually be hazardous to your health. 1. Don’t Miss: The 2 Best Oils for Cooking (and 2 to Skip) 2. 3. 4. 5. Related: 5 Things in Your Kitchen That Could Be Making You Sick 6. Related: 3 Health Reasons to Cook with Cast Iron 7. Don't Miss: 7 Simple Ways to Detox Your Diet and Kitchen 8. 9. 10. Must-Read: How to Break 4 More Bad Cooking Habits What bad cooking habits do you need to break? By Hilary Meyer, EatingWell Associate Food Editor EatingWell Associate Food Editor Hilary Meyer spends much of her time in the EatingWell Test Kitchen, testing and developing healthy recipes. More from EatingWell:

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