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United Nations

United Nations
The United Nations (UN) is an intergovernmental organization established on 24 October 1945 to promote international co-operation. A replacement for the ineffective League of Nations, the organization was created following the Second World War to prevent another such conflict. At its founding, the UN had 51 member states; there are now 193. The UN Headquarters is situated in Manhattan, New York City and enjoys extraterritoriality. Further main offices are situated in Geneva, Nairobi and Vienna. During the Second World War, US President Franklin D. The organization won the Nobel Peace Prize in 2001, and a number of its officers and agencies have also been awarded the prize. History Background and creation Cold War era Dag Hammarskjöld was a particularly active Secretary-General from 1953 until his death in 1961. With the spread of decolonization in the 1960s, the organization's membership saw an influx of newly independent nations. Post-Cold War Structure General Assembly Related:  NWO

Aborted Baby Fetal Cells Used As Food Flavour Enhancers. Shareholders Condemn PepsiCo | Social & Human Rights Issues Aborted Baby Fetal Cells Used As Food Flavour Enhancers. Shareholders Condemn PepsiCo One wonders if this could be considered a form of cannibalism?! I have abbreviated the following Life News article. LifeNews.com By Steven Ertelt Oct.25, 2011 Pepsi shareholders have filed a shareholder resolution with the Securities and Exchange Commission and PepsiCo demanding that the company has been contracting with a research firm that uses fetal cells from babies victimized by abortions to test and produce artificial flavour enhancers. [T]ens of thousands of pro-life people voiced their opposition to PepsiCo contracting with biotech company Senomyx after it was found to be testing their food additives using fetal cells from abortions. A pro-life group, Children of God For Life, (CGFL) stated: “they don’t tell the public that (Senomyx) is using HEK 293 – human embryonic kidney cells taken from an electively aborted baby to produce those flavour receptors”. About ron abbass

Viajar Blog de viajes :: Pasaporteblog Abortion Abortion, when induced in the developed world in accordance with local law, is among the safest procedures in medicine.[1] However, unsafe abortions result in approximately 47,000 maternal deaths[2] and 5 million hospital admissions per year globally.[3] An estimated 44 million abortions are performed globally each year, with slightly under half of those performed unsafely.[4] The incidence of abortion has stabilized in recent years,[4] having previously spent decades declining as access to family planning education and contraceptive services increased.[5] Forty percent of the world's women have access to legal induced abortions (within gestational limits).[6] Induced abortion has a long history and has been performed by various methods, including herbal abortifacients, the use of sharpened tools, physical trauma, and other traditional methods. Contemporary medicine utilizes medications and surgical procedures. Types Induced Spontaneous Methods Practice of Induced Abortion Methods Medical

UK - Language Welcome to our guide to the UK. This is useful for anyone researching British culture, customs, manners, etiquette, values and wanting to understand the people better. You may be going to Britain on business, for a visit or even hosting British colleagues or clients in your own country. Facts and Statistics Location: Western Europe, islands including the northern one-sixth of the island of Ireland between the North Atlantic Ocean and the North Sea, northwest of France Capital: London Climate: temperate; moderated by prevailing southwest winds over the North Atlantic Current; more than one-half of the days are overcast Population: 60,776,238 (July 2007 est.) Ethnic Make-up: white (of which English 83.6%, Scottish 8.6%, Welsh 4.9%, Northern Irish 2.9%) 92.1%, black 2%, Indian 1.8%, Pakistani 1.3%, mixed 1.2%, other 1.6% (2001 census) Religions: Christian (Anglican, Roman Catholic, Presbyterian, Methodist) 71.6%, Muslim 2.7%, Hindu 1%, other 1.6%, unspecified or none 23.1% (2001 census)

Federal Reserve System The Federal Reserve System (also known as the Federal Reserve, and informally as the Fed) is the central banking system of the United States. It was created on December 23, 1913, with the enactment of the Federal Reserve Act, largely in response to a series of financial panics, particularly a severe panic in 1907.[2][3][4][5][6][7] Over time, the roles and responsibilities of the Federal Reserve System have expanded, and its structure has evolved.[3][8] Events such as the Great Depression were major factors leading to changes in the system.[9] The U.S. The authority of the Federal Reserve System is derived from statutes enacted by the U.S. Congress and the System is subject to congressional oversight. The members of the Board of Governors, including its chair and vice-chair, are chosen by the President and confirmed by the Senate. Purpose[edit] Current functions of the Federal Reserve System include:[12][25] Addressing the problem of bank panics[edit] Elastic currency[edit]

untry Profiles - Global Guide to Culture, Customs and Etiquette Understanding other people's languages, cultures, etiquettes and taboos is of great value to the traveller or visiting business person. Scroll down the page for information on a selected number of countries. Topics include language, useful phrases, the society, culture, business and social etiquettes. You can access Useful Phrases here or through the corresponding country. Please feel free to share comments you may have about our guides as we are always looking to improve the quality and accuracy of information. This information is also available as an App for the iPhone. Etiquette, Customs and Protocol Guides Warning! It is important to bear in mind that these guides act as basic and general introductions only. Each society, country and culture will have numerous nuances that would make it irresponsible to suggest a uniform approach to understanding any country's social/business culture or etiquette.

Cancer Cancer The causes of cancer are diverse, complex, and only partially understood. Many things are known to increase the risk of cancer, including tobacco use, dietary factors, certain infections, exposure to radiation, lack of physical activity, obesity, and environmental pollutants.[2] These factors can directly damage genes or combine with existing genetic faults within cells to cause cancerous mutations.[3] Approximately 5–10% of cancers can be traced directly to inherited genetic defects.[4] Many cancers could be prevented by not smoking, eating more vegetables, fruits and whole grains, eating less meat and refined carbohydrates, maintaining a healthy weight, exercising, minimizing sunlight exposure, and being vaccinated against some infectious diseases.[2][5] Cancer can be detected in a number of ways, including the presence of certain signs and symptoms, screening tests, or medical imaging. Definitions There is no one definition that describes all cancers. Signs and symptoms Causes

Diabetes mellitus Type 1 DM results from the pancreas' failure to produce enough insulin. This form was previously referred to as "insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus" (IDDM) or "juvenile diabetes". The cause is unknown.[3]Type 2 DM begins with insulin resistance, a condition in which cells fail to respond to insulin properly.[3] As the disease progresses a lack of insulin may also develop.[6] This form was previously referred to as "non insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus" (NIDDM) or "adult-onset diabetes". Prevention and treatment involve a healthy diet, physical exercise, not using tobacco and being a normal body weight. Signs and symptoms Overview of the most significant symptoms of diabetes Diabetic emergencies Low blood sugar is common in persons with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. A rare but equally severe possibility is hyperosmolar nonketotic state, which is more common in type 2 diabetes and is mainly the result of dehydration.[20] Complications There is a link between cognitive deficit and diabetes.

Aspartame controversy The artificial sweetener aspartame has been the subject of several controversies since its initial approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1974. The FDA approval of aspartame was highly contested,[1] with critics alleging that the quality of the initial research supporting its safety was inadequate and flawed and that conflicts of interest marred the 1981 approval of aspartame.[2][3][4] In 1987, the U.S. Government Accountability Office concluded that the food additive approval process had been followed properly for aspartame.[2][5] The irregularities fueled a conspiracy theory, which circulated along with claims, counter to the weight of medical evidence, that numerous health conditions (such as multiple sclerosis, systemic lupus, methanol toxicity, blindness, spasms, shooting pains, seizures, headaches, depression, anxiety, memory loss, birth defects and death[6]) are caused by the consumption of aspartame in normal doses in the "Nancy Markle" email hoax.[7][8][9]

Water fluoridation controversy The water fluoridation controversy arises from political, moral, ethical,[1] and safety concerns regarding the fluoridation of public water supplies. The controversy occurs mainly in English-speaking countries, as Continental Europe has ceased water fluoridation.[2] Those opposed argue that water fluoridation may cause serious health problems, is not effective enough to justify the costs, and has a dosage that cannot be precisely controlled.[3][4][5] In some countries, fluoride is added to table salt.[6] At the dosage recommended for water fluoridation, the only known adverse effect is dental fluorosis, which can alter the appearance of children's teeth during tooth development.[7] Dental fluorosis is cosmetic and unlikely to represent any other effect on public health.[8] Despite opponents' concerns, water fluoridation has been effective at reducing cavities in both children and adults.[7] Ethics Safety Efficacy Statements against water fluoridation Neutral statement Use throughout the world

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