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Discovering the gifted ex-child

Discovering the gifted ex-child
Discovering the Gifted Ex-Child Abstract Most of the attention given to the gifted over the years has been devoted to gifted children, a population identified by unusual mental processing that sets them apart from the norms. Gifted adults, however, are recognized in our society solely by their achievements. The innate qualities of mind that are found in gifted children do not disappear as the children grow up. The unusual developmental trajectory of the gifted creates an extraordinary experience of life for the individual at any age, whether or not that individual is able to achieve in ways society recognizes and values. The achievement orientation that has always existed for adults and is now taking over the field of gifted education, makes it difficult for the gifted to understand the qualities of mind that make them different. Stephanie Tolan (Stephanie Tolan is a consultant, writer, and a Contributing Editor of the Roeper Review.) Who am I? Where Have the Gifted Children Gone?

http://www.sengifted.org/archives/articles/discovering-the-gifted-ex-child

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