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Evgeny Morozov: How the Net aids dictatorships

Evgeny Morozov: How the Net aids dictatorships

http://www.ted.com/talks/evgeny_morozov_is_the_internet_what_orwell_feared.html

Related:  Limits on the Media

No Warrant, No Problem: How the Government Can Still Get Your Digital Data Update, Jan. 8, 2014: This post has been updated. It was originally published on Dec. 4, 2012. The government isn't allowed to wiretap American citizens without a warrant from a judge. But there are plenty of legal ways for law enforcement, from the local sheriff to the FBI to the Internal Revenue Service, to snoop on the digital trails you create every day. Authorities can often obtain your emails and texts by going to Google or AT&T with a simple subpoena that doesn’t require showing probable cause of a crime. Clay Shirky Clay Shirky (born 1964[2]) is an American writer, consultant and teacher on the social and economic effects of Internet technologies. He has a joint appointment at New York University (NYU) as a Distinguished Writer in Residence at the Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute and Assistant Arts Professor in the New Media focused graduate Interactive Telecommunications Program (ITP).[3] His courses address, among other things, the interrelated effects of the topology of social networks and technological networks, how our networks shape culture and vice-versa.[4] Education and career[edit] Shirky was the first Professor of New Media in the Media Studies department at Hunter College, where he developed the MFA in Integrated Media Arts program.

Chris Anderson (entrepreneur) Chris Anderson 2007 Anderson was born in Pakistan in 1957, one of three children.[1] His parents were medical missionaries, and he spent most of his early life in Pakistan, India and Afghanistan. He studied at a boarding school in the Himalayan mountains of India, Woodstock School, before moving to a boarding school in Bath, UK. Internet freedom in 'global decline,' report finds Internet freedom in countries around the world has declined sharply in the past year despite a pushback from activists that successfully blocked some governments’ repressive laws, according to a new report. The study, by advocacy group Freedom House, looked at online trends in 60 countries, evaluating each nation them based on obstacles to access, limits to content and violations of user rights. It found that in 35 of the countries monitored, governments had expanded their legal and technical surveillance powers in regards to citizen's online activities. “Broad surveillance, new laws controlling web content and growing arrests of social media users drove a worldwide decline in Internet freedom in the past year,” the authors of the report concluded. Of the countries included in the research, Iceland came top in terms of giving its citizens the highest level of freedom. China, Cuba and Iran were listed as the most restrictive for a second consecutive year.

Here Comes Everybody This article is about the book. For the fictional character, see Finnegans Wake. Here Comes Everybody: The Power of Organizing Without Organizations is a book by Clay Shirky published by Penguin Press in 2008 on the effect of the Internet on modern group dynamics and organization. The author considers examples such as Wikipedia and MySpace in his analysis. According to Shirky, the book is about "what happens when people are given the tools to do things together, without needing traditional organizational structures".[1] The title of the work alludes to HCE, a recurring and central figure in James Joyce's Finnegans Wake.[2]

Ted – the ultimate forum for blue-sky thinking So, what is TED? And, more important, why should I care? For 22 years, Ted was a conference, an exclusive ideas forum where the great and the good came to hear Al Gore talk about climate change and Bill Gates about computing, right up until four years ago, when TED Talks was launched online and promptly became an internet sensation. It's a bit like YouTube, but instead of featuring cats falling into lavatories, it has short, cutting-edge talks by the world's leading neuroscientists, behavioural economists, video artists, philosophers, particle physicists, rocket scientists, endurance athletes, Aids researchers… you name it, it's been at TED. What TED does is seek out the most interesting, unusual and potentially groundbreaking ideas on Earth and then provide a platform to share them with the world. At the heart of it all are the conferences.

Is Maryville, Missouri the Next Steubenville? Some of this is misleading or missing some very important points: 1) That was a curious quote to choose from the sheriff. The Gawker quotes were more accurate. "For his part, White, the sheriff, maintains “no doubt” a crime was committed that night. The doctor who treated Daisy the following morning called the prosecutor’s decision to drop the charges “surprising.” And one longtime Missouri attorney believes the Colemans’ status as relative outsiders played a part in the cases’ dismissals." Evgeny Morozov Evgeny Morozov (2010) Evgeny Morozov (Russian: Евгений Морозов) is a writer and researcher of Belarusian origin who studies political and social implications of technology. He is currently a senior editor at The New Republic.

Richard Saul Wurman Career[edit] Wurman chaired the IDCA Conference in 1972, the First Federal Design assembly in 1973, and the annual AIA Conference in 1976. He is perhaps best known for having cofounded and chaired the TED conference from 1984 thru 2002, bringing together various thinkers in the fields of Technology, Entertainment and Design. He also created the TEDMED conference (1995-2010) and the e.g. conference in 2006. In 1976, Wurman coined the phrase "information architect" in response to the large amount of information generated in contemporary society, which is often presented with little care or order. Wurman said, "I thought the explosion of data needed an architecture, needed a series of systems, needed systemic design, a series of performance criteria to measure it

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