background preloader

One Glassy Garden: Growing Herbs in Mason Jars

One Glassy Garden: Growing Herbs in Mason Jars
Forget the usual terracotta and (ugh!) plastic pots for container gardening. When you grow herbs in mason jars, you can have garden fresh ingredients on hand and also add some style to a sunny windowsill. Picture a row of mason jars filled with different herbs—basil, chives, parsley, cilantro, thyme, rosemary—dressing up your kitchen. With the right conditions—ample light and proper drainage—most herbs are extremely easy to grow, and growing them in mason jars is no different. 1. 2. 3. Finally, add some labels so you won’t forget what you planted! You diy, recycling junkies could also use pasta jars, pickle jars or whatever other glass container you come across for this project. image: B_Zedan

Michael Moore - SW School of Botanical Medicine Home Page Started in 1994, this site was maintained by Michael Moore, and was last updated by him on July 22, 2008 When my typewriter broke 14 years ago, I grudgingly purchased my first computer at age 53...an ancient used Mac Plus, recommended for low-tech ageing neo-Luddite green hippies such as myself. 12 computers, 4 scanners, 8 powerbooks, 4 digital cameras, 3 LCD projectors and 3 mini DV cameras later, I STILL have two unused ribbons left over from that Smith-Corona. All OCR work is done with FineReader 5 Pro by ABBYY (the best! If an ol' bear like me can pull this off, imagine what YOU could do for our collective benefit! You are visitor number:

Soda Bottle Carrots Seventeen days after I planted carrots in a sawed-off soda bottle, young carrot tops had sprouted on the windowsill in my basement. I encourage people who have little space that they can still grow small kitchen gardens. To that end, on May 1st I cut the top off of a two-liter soda bottle, filled the bottle with soil, and planted carrots in it. Mature Container Carrots After three months of growing, a carrot of nearly any variety should be mature. After three months of growth, my container carrots have pathetic tops. So, my container carrots—a variety that matures in 65 days—ought to be dropping seeds all over my deck. The good news is that those sickly-looking carrot tops protrude from very pronounced orange carrot shoulders. Pushing Plants When my container carrots started to look bad, I took some steps to pep them up: I pulled a carrot to provide a bit more space in the soil (I’d planted 11 seeds). The good news: my soda bottle carrot plants have shoulders! If I don’t?

Common Spicebush Look for spicebushes in damp, partially shaded, rich woodlands, on mountains' lower slopes, in thickets, and along stream banks, throughout the Eastern United States, except the northernmost regions. Pioneers knew that this was good soil for farms, with moist, fertile soil. The berries, which taste a little like allspice, are an irreplaceable seasoning for me. Rinse them, pat them dry, and chop them in a blender or spice grinder. If you have neither, put them under a towel and crush them with a hammer. Since spiceberries are ripe in apple season, they often find themselves in the same pot. To store long-range, donít dry the berries. Collect the twigs year-round for teas, or use the leaves from mid spring to fall. Pioneers called this plant fever bush because a strong bark decoction makes you sweat, activating the immune system and expelling toxins. The Indians used a spiceberry infusion for coughs, colds, delayed menstruation, croup, and measles.

Container Gardening Vegetable - Lettuce is the Perfect Container Gardening Vegetable I love growing lettuce. It's fast, easy and is the perfect container gardening vegetable. One advantage of growing lettuce in a container garden is that it easier to protect it from pests. I've had too many lettuce plants devoured before I get a chance to eat them. I put my lettuce container gardens up on tables or chairs to protect them from the legions of woodchucks, squirrels and bunnies that love to feast on my lettuce. You can grow lettuce in almost any container, as long as it has good drainage. You do have to be careful with any metal container, in the blistering hot sun because they can get hot and cook your plants root system. Here's what you need to make a lettuce container garden in a colander: SunColanderPotting soilPlastic window screeningFertilizerLettuce seed or seedlings 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Great lettuces to try in container gardens: Black Seeded Simpson (heat tolerant)Simpson Elite (heat tolerant)Tropicana (heat tolerant)Elegance Seed Mix, from Johnny's SeedsMesclun mixes

Granny Woman Ozark Herbs Urban Agriculture: A Guide to Container Gardens A Guide to Container Gardens With inexpensive containers and suitable soil mix,you can create an urban garden virtually anywhere - on roof tops,vacant city lots, borwn fields, and unused portion of parking lots Job S. Ebenezer, Ph.D.President, Technology for the Poor, 877 PELHAM COURT, WESTERVILLE, OHIO - 43081technologyforthepoor@yahoo.com It is estimated that by 2030 AD nearly 50% of the world’s population may live in urban areas. Due to the recent terrorist attacks, food security and safety are seriously compromised. Migration from rural areas also brings into the urban areas many persons with very little formal education. Urban agriculture has the potential for creating micro-enterprises that can be owned and operated by the community members without too much of initial capital. Urban farming is not new. A few decades ago ECHO (Education Concerns for Hunger Organization) in Fort Myers, Florida, has introduced container garden techniques for impoverished counties like Haiti.

The Lazy Lady’s Guide to DIY: Hanging Herb Garden At some point near the middle of March, I always decide that I’m “done” with winter. The sweaters and jackets get pushed to the back of the closet, the flip flops come out, and I inevitably freeze my butt off for several weeks until the weather catches up with my warm-weather state of mind. Likewise, my cravings for fresh herbs and veggies are always a little ahead of the season. Growing your own herbs is a great way to save money and avoid buying too much at a time and letting most of it go to waste. What you’ll need: Tin containers with snap-on plastic lids (tea, cocoa, and coffee cans are a good bet), coat hangers, pliers, scissors, herbs (I bought basil, rosemary, dill, and cilantro for about $2.50 each), masking tape, coffee filters, a nail, a hammer, X-acto knife, scrap fabric or paper, and glue or spray adhesive. After you’ve emptied and cleaned your cans, remove the bottom of the can with a can opener. Slide the bottom inside the can, holding it up from inside. Happy growing!

The entrepreneur behind Mario Batali's edible herb wall - Apr. 12, 2010 Jim Mumford's edible walls bring herb gardens to unexpected spaces.By Eilene Zimmerman, contributing writerApril 12, 2010: 9:59 AM ET SAN DIEGO (CNNMoney.com) -- Mario Batali decided last year to install a garden between his adjoining West Hollywood restaurants, Osteria Mozza and Pizzeria Mozza. But a plain old backyard patch wouldn't do. Batali wanted something more visually striking, something more ... vertical? So he turned to Jim Mumford, the owner of Good Earth Plant and Flower Company in San Diego. Mumford, 52, had built a reputation as a nontraditional gardener. When customers saw Mumford's urban oasis, they started asking him about rooftop vegetable gardens. "You would need to either harness yourself or build a 42-inch wall around the edge so you don't fall off while working there," he says. But building gardens on a wall -- now that was something Mumford could do. And the timing was ripe, says Caron Golden, the culinary blogger behind San Diego Foodstuff. Share thisShare this

Related: