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Weather Wiz Kids weather information for kids

Weather Wiz Kids weather information for kids
Volcanoes (Volcanoes are not associated with weather, but instead are natural disasters.) What is a volcano?A volcano is a mountain that opens downward to a pool of molten rock below the surface of the earth. When pressure builds up, eruptions occur. Gases and rock shoot up through the opening and spill over or fill the air with lava fragments. Eruptions can cause lateral blasts, lava flows, hot ash flows, mudslides, avalanches, falling ash and floods. Click Here to learn more about volcanoes from USGS. How are volcanoes formed? What are plate tectonics? Click Here to learn more about plate tectonics and the drifting of our continents. How many volcanoes are there? What are the different types of volcanoes? What is the difference between lava and magma? Why does lava take a long time to cool down? What is a pyroclastic flow? What is lahar? What is pumice? What is the largest active volcano? What is the Ring of Fire? When did Mount St. Click Here for more info on Mount St. Know the Lingo

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Volcano A volcano is a place on the Earth's surface (or any other planet's or moon's surface) where molten rock, gases and pyroclastic debris erupt through the earth's crust. Volcanoes vary quite a bit in their structure - some are cracks in the earth's crust where lava erupts, and some are domes, shields, or mountain-like structures with a crater at the summit. Magma is molten rock within the Earth's crust. When magma erupts through the earth's surface it is called lava.

Volcano Facts 6. Volcanoes are classified as active, dormant or extinct depending on the amount of volcanic activity happening. 'Active' means there's regular activity, 'dormant' means there's been recent activity but that it's currently quiet and 'extinct', meaning it's been so long since the last eruption that it's unlikely to ever erupt again. 7. When you imagine a volcano, you might picture it as a large, slope-sided mountain, but volcanoes can actually be a variety of shapes. Shield (flat), composite (tall and thin), cinder cones (circular or oval cones), and lava domes (where dome-shaped deposits of hardened lava have built up around the vent, as the lava is too thick to flow very far).

OneGeology - Volcanoes Hello! My name is Vera and I would like to tell you a bit more about volcanoes. The name volcano comes from Vulcan, the Roman god of fire! Earthquake Country Alliance: Seven Steps to Earthquake Safety After the next big earthquake, your recovery and that of the community may take weeks to months or even longer. While earthquakes can be a traumatic experience, it's important not to let important things slip that will help you, your family, and your community get back on your feet. While this phase only has one step, the time involved will most likely be the longest, especially if your home or workplace has been damaged. Any community struck by disaster will be affected in some significant way. But keep in mind that a community is only as strong as the residents who make it up, so invoivement in the recovery, priorities, and "how" a community comes back is very important. This is because the people who normally make the decisions in a community may not be there, or others or are not as familiar with unique aspects of a community are trying to help guide the road back.

Fun Volcano Facts for Kids - Interesting Facts about Volcanoes Volcanoes are openings in the Earth’s surface. When they are active they can let ash, gas and hot magma escape in sometimes violent and spectacular eruptions. The word volcano originally comes from the name of the Roman god of fire, Vulcan. Volcanoes are usually located where tectonic plates meet. This is especially true for the Pacific Ring of Fire, an area around the Pacific Ocean where over 75% of the volcanoes on Earth are found. While most volcanoes form near tectonic boundaries, they can also form in areas that contain abnormally hot rock inside the Earth. How Volcanoes Work" Whenever there is a major volcanic eruption in the world, you'll­ see a slew of newspaper articles and nightly news stories covering the catastrophe, all stressing a familiar set of words -- violent, raging, awesome. When faced with a spewing volcano, people today share many of the same feelings volcano-observers have had throughout human history: We are in awe of the destructive power of nature, and we are unsettled by the thought that a peaceful mountain can suddenly become an unstoppable destructive force! While scientists have cleared up much of the mystery surrounding volcanoes, our knowledge has not made volcanoes any less amazing.

Volcano Facts Volcanoes are openings in the Earth’s surface. When they are active they can let ash, gas and hot magma escape in sometimes violent and spectacular eruptions. The word volcano originally comes from the name of the Roman god of fire, Vulcan. Volcanoes for Kids - Geography Games and Videos Volcanoes for Kids Volcanoes are vents, fissures or openings in the Earth's crust from which hot ashes, gases and magma erupt. On land, volcanoes usually take the form of mountains or hills with one or more volcanic vents.

Earthquake Country Alliance: Seven Steps to Earthquake Safety During the next big earthquake, and immediately after, is when your level of preparedness will make a difference in how you and others survive and can respond to emergencies. The following steps describe what to do during earthquake shaking and immediately after. Step 5 provides information for how to protect yourself in different locations and scenarios during an earthquake. Step 6 describes what to do next to prevent further injuries or damage. Would you like to be part of the biggest earthquake safety drill in history?

Volcano Facts, Volcano Information, Volcano Videos, Volcano Photos Volcanoes are awesome manifestations of the fiery power contained deep within the Earth. These formations are essentially vents on the Earth's surface where molten rock, debris, and gases from the planet's interior are emitted. When thick magma and large amounts of gas build up under the surface, eruptions can be explosive, expelling lava, rocks and ash into the air. Less gas and more viscous magma usually mean a less dramatic eruption, often causing streams of lava to ooze from the vent. The mountain-like mounds that we associate with volcanoes are what remain after the material spewed during eruptions has collected and hardened around the vent.

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