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Teaching Students to Become Curators of Ideas: The Curation Project

Teaching Students to Become Curators of Ideas: The Curation Project
I know a lot of people view curation as a buzz word devoid of meaning, but I like the metaphor! I think it beautifully captures the process we need to go through to best make sense of the vast amount of information available on the web. Of course, it doesn’t help that a lot of people use the word curation to describe activities that don’t live up to the metaphor. And that takes away from its power. The Curation Project & the PLN As part of the social media class, my students are required to set up a network of online mentors using social media tools. In essence, I tasked students with creating the ultimate resource on a particular topic and to share it with the world. The Student Projects: This was without a doubt one of the most rewarding assignments I’ve graded. As far as curation services are concerned, it seems most students gravitated towards Scoop.it and Storify. Storyful Projects: Branding Insights from a Journalist (Meredith) Scoop.it Projects: Storify Projects: Related:  Articles About Curation

11 Ways to use Symbaloo in the Classroom - The Edublogger NOTE: This is a guest post by Mimi Chau from the Symbaloo team. Edublogs just rolled out a free Symbaloo plugin available to all users that we think you’ll enjoy! What is Symbaloo? Symbaloo is a free social bookmarking tool. A fun and simple way to organize and store all your digital resources in the cloud. You can categorize your resources, share and access them from any device. Why Should You Symbaloo? Symbaloo helps teachers curate content and share the best of the web with their students. “Help, I’m drowning!” As schools start to implement 1:1 or BOYD methods in the classroom, teachers are required to keep up with the latest technology and teaching methods. And what about the “non tech-savvy” teachers that are struggling with technology? Symbaloo allows teachers to share valuable resources with their students and with each other. How do you Symbaloo in your classroom? 11 Ways to use Symbaloo in the Classroom 1. How do you share links with your students and parents? 2. Music Webmix: 3.

Blogging as a Curation Platform I have written about curation before using Twitter as a Curation Tool and about the importance of helping our Students Becoming Curators of Information. Sue Waters also just published a very comprehensive Curation: Creatively Filtering Content on her blog. According to Heidi Cohen Content curation requires more than just the selection of information. I want to take a look at curation through the lens of blogging. Curator:Consciously becoming the curator for others for a particular niche, area of expertise or interest. The same uses apply to blogging as a curation tool with the difference that blogging allows you greater freedom in terms of length, presentation formatting and design, as well as connecting and hyperlinking. As a blogger, I have found the following workflow as a curator: Find & Acquire Find information, do research, use RSS, social or traditional media channels. Some Don’ts for Curators: Rohit Bhargava reminds us that How do you use your blog as a curation tool? Related 12. 3.

How Educators Are Using Pinterest for Showcasing, Curation Pinterest is the “in” site of 2012, and its phenomenal growth has sparked interest among millions of users. It’s also spread to journalism educators, who are increasingly experimenting with it in the classroom. The social network launched two years ago, but in recent months has drawn red-hot excitement for its unique visual, topic-based curation approach. While its 10 million users, especially women, are drawn to it almost obsessively, brands, media firms and news organizations have also planted flags on the network. Now J-school faculty are increasingly in on the act. From ‘mood boards’ to ‘survival boards’ One early adopter was University of Southern California’s Andrew Lih, who last October, long before he and many others knew the site would become a blockbuster, introduced it to online students in an entrepreneurial class to gather what he called a “mood board” for a project on public art. Aggregating images to share with students is an increasingly common classroom use for the tool. A.

Teaching With Content Curation -- THE Journal 21st Century School | Feature Teaching With Content Curation With two mobile laptop carts that are used primarily for technology classes and a student body that has limited access to computers outside of school, Stockton Collegiate International School isn’t exactly a hotbed of ed tech. In Hauna Zaich’s 8th- and 10th-grade English classes, for example, students—a good portion of whom are English learners—are using a process known as “content curation” to cull through the many resources on the web, select the most relevant ones, and then organize those resources in a logical format for sharing and later use. Defined as the act of discovering, gathering, and presenting digital content that relates a specific subject, content curation is less about creating new resources and more about amassing information and then maintaining it in a logical fashion. Flipping the Classroom

Content Curation Primer Photo by Stuck in Customs What is Content Curation? Content curation is the process of sorting through the vast amounts of content on the web and presenting it in a meaningful and organized way around a specific theme. The work involves sifting, sorting, arranging, and publishing information. A content curator cherry picks the best content that is important and relevant to share with their community. Content curation is not about collecting links or being an information pack rat, it is more about putting them into a context with organization, annotation, and presentation. People and organizations are now making and sharing media and content all over the social web. Content Curation Provides Value from the Inside Out What does that mean for nonprofits and the people who work for them? For some staff members, content curation can be professional of learning. The Three S’s of Content Curation: Seek, Sense, Share Content curation is a three-part process: Seek, Sense, and Share. Getting Started

What Is Content Curation? If you’re like most overstretched and under-resourced marketers, you’re too busy to churn out original content that engages prospects, builds relationships, and supports your branding strategy. Fortunately, content curation is a pretty simple solution that can help you deliver meaningful and relevant content to your audience consistently. What is content curation, though? Why should you consider adding it to your brand’s content marketing strategy? How do you even curate content? What Is Content Curation? It’s easier to find and comment on relevant pieces of content than it is to create your own masterpiece from scratch. It’s the process of aggregating data about a specific topic, distilling that information to identify the most important ideas, organizing those ideas into a logical order, adding your unique spin to them, and then presenting the content to your adoring audience. You’re not regurgitating what you’ve read. Why Your Business Should Consider This Tactic The Process

Why Scoopit Is Becoming An Indispensable Learning Tool Leanna Johnson, Learning with Technology Scoop.it collates work from online publications using an online magazine format, and this visual impact alone makes it very effective. The additional appeal of broadcasting from a hub allows me to tap into and share with my ed tech networks, which is why I find myself using it more often during time constraints. First of all, it’s powerful–it incorporates multiple elements of familiar social media tools. But it’s also very flexible–the mobile app is quite functional for both iPhone and Android, and a toolbar plugin can be installed on browser windows. Additionally, using Scoop.it will meet multiple standards (Common Core and NETS-S) across the curriculum. Curation is a valuable skill for today’s learner. Using Scoop.it on a mobile device makes it a constrained platform, which lessens stress. Why Students Like Scoop.it 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Why Educators like Scoop.it 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Why Use Scoopit?

Thing 6: Curation Tools | SLS Cool Tools – Hudson Valley Collecting, Curating and More Have you heard the buzz over the past year or two about “digital curation” or “content curation” and wondered what it is all about? We might associate being a curator with selecting objects, interpreting context and managing collections in a musuem, but it describes what librarians do with their collections, aka: ‘collection development’. And if you’ve ever selected, evaluated and organized a collection of great web resources for a research project, then you were doing “digital curation.” So why the sudden buzz? Social Bookmarking: Many of us have been collecting and organizing resources for a long time now using tools like delicious and diigo. Digital Curation tools take these ideas further. MentorMob and Learnist are also interesting curation tools, but with an educational twist. Content Aggregators: This group of tools takes a different twist on curation. Pick 1 (or more!) This service has become incredibly popular over the past year. Examples & Resources

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