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You Are What You Read

You Are What You Read

http://www.scholastic.com/kids/stacks/

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Learning in Hand Tweets from this session are tagged #inhand In project-based learning, students work over an extended period of time answering a driving question. The question is so deep that it requires students to create a project to share their findings with others. Process for learning through projects: QuestionInvestigateShare Video summary of Project Based Learning in Hand Best Educational Websites and Games for High-School Students About ETR Community EdTechReview (ETR) is a community of and for everyone involved in education technology to connect and collaborate both online and offline to discover, learn, utilize and share about the best ways technology can improve learning, teaching, and leading in the 21st century. EdTechReview spreads awareness on education technology and its role in 21st century education through best research and practices of using technology in education, and by facilitating events, training, professional development, and consultation in its adoption and implementation.

ReadWriteThink Home › Parent & Afterschool Resources Looking for engaging ways to introduce your child to reading or to encourage your teen to write? Need some age-appropriate book suggestions or rainy day activities? The materials here are your answer—all of them created by experts to be fun, educational, and easy to use outside of school. Parent & Afterschool Resources by Grades

Google Lit Trips for Young Readers Where in the world will our youngest readers travel as they discover the world of books! Reading About Reading Kind Words Site Map Success Begins with Effective Design When I started doing project-based learning with my students, I noticed two immediate changes in my classroom. First, my students were far more interested in doing projects based on the content we were learning than they were in simply listening to me give a lecture on the topic. Second, attendance went up and classroom problems went down.

25 Epic Design Tips for Non-Designers Get your graphic design game-face on with these inspiring tips. Whether you’re a creating graphics for social media or designing an invitation for an upcoming event, the application of graphic design is vast and versatile. From font pairing and scale, to alignment and white space, the facets of the design world are complex. Let these 26 epic design tips help you through the pits and the peaks of the creative process. Spelling & Vocabulary Website: SpellingCity MinecraftEdu Over 25 Links Uncovering Project Based Learning Resources On The Web Welcome to this first in a series of PBL Mania Posts. For the next few weeks I am celebrating Project Based Learning by hosting a webinar at Edtech Leaders Online, and by presenting a PBL session at the NICE Conference in Chicago. In this post I will introduce you to some awesome places on the web containing some of the very best PBL resources. Before reading, please take a moment to subscribe to this 21centuryedtech Blog by email or RSS and also give me a follow on Twitter at mjgormans.

Project-Based Learning in Elementary School Welcome to YouTube! The location filter shows you popular videos from the selected country or region on lists like Most Viewed and in search results.To change your location filter, please use the links in the footer at the bottom of the page. Click "OK" to accept this setting, or click "Cancel" to set your location filter to "Worldwide". The location filter shows you popular videos from the selected country or region on lists like Most Viewed and in search results. Project Based Learning Resources (image from education-world.com) Project Based Learning (PBL) is a great way to teach students content, 21st century skills, and engage them in something fun and educational. I spoke more about PBL in an earlier blog ( and we had some great reader comments (Tech&Learning, May 2009, page 14). Today I'd like to give some tips and ideas on how to get started with PBL in your classroom.

This site is designed for children grades 5 to 12. Kids can find more information about their favorite books and authors, and also practice their writing skills, chat with others, play games, read news, and watch videos. Advertisement is related only to Scholastic products. Teaching tips: 1. Teachers can update the library they use with their students by selecting the books in the Most Popular Series section. 2. Teachers can start a discussion board about the books kids are reading. This activity is appropriate for kids in grades 7 to 12. Boards are moderated by the site. 3. Students can write book reviews and discuss about different reviewers’ opinions. by gabrielapearltrees Oct 25

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