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Hello: The Art of Esao Andrews

Hello: The Art of Esao Andrews

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Related:  Various ArtistsIncroyables talents artistiques et Créations originales

Francois Abelanet's vertigo-inducing street Stunning images offer a 3D glimpse into surreal worlds, giving the impression viewer is thousands of feet above sceneWorks created by French artist Francois Abelanet for an event showcasing the latest range of Renault trucksThe work was also an attempt to enter the Guinness Book of Records for the largest street art work By James Rush Published: 18:45 GMT, 6 July 2013 | Updated: 20:56 GMT, 6 July 2013 Suspended thousands of feet above the city below, this bridge would probably not be the most popular of places for those with a fear of heights. Yet something is not quite right about the city which lies underneath the feet of those walking across the structure - as none of the boats in the harbour move and the skyscrapers show no activity of life, you could almost be forgiven for thinking you were looking at a picture. But that's because this vertigo-inducing scene was in fact created by French artist Francois Abelanet.

Henry Darger: Art by Any Means This post is a bit different than what we normally share on Abduzeedo but I couldn't resist sharing it anyways. I recently watched one of the most inspiring documentaries I've ever seen, titled, In the Realms of the Unreal. In it acclaimed documentary film maker Jessica Yu tells the story of the mysterious self-taught artist Henry Darger. Peintures à la crème glacée - Othman Toma Iraqi artist Othman Toma creates these paintings using melted ice-creams. If you look at his site he usually draws with pencils or paints with watercolours, these paintings are proof that you can produce art in a variety of unconventional ways. There are some out there that say that these paintings, could not have been painted with the ice-creams, Othman says that, that is what he used as his paint, maybe next time he should do a time lapse video to prove them wrong.

The World Through The Eyes Of Sammy Slabbinck Courtesy of Sammy Slabbinck. Playfully distorting proportion and cultural context, Belgian artist Sammy Slabbinck’s work comprises surreal collages and illustrations that somewhat unexpectedly combine vintage with contemporary images. Slabbinck likes to play around with different styles and proportions with the aim of creating powerful yet simple visual works that are permeated by a subtle sense of humour.

An Illustrated Book of Bad Arguments A reader recently wrote in asking if I could share a bit about the process of putting the book together and talk about how the project started. Certainly. I go on two solitary walks every day. There is a small park off the Embarcadero that is tucked away in a quiet spot. It has a pleasant stream flowing through it and an unassuming bench beside that stream. 15 astounding examples of photorealism These illustrators, painters and artists have an unfathomable talent. Creating photo realistic portraits and landscapes using only a pen, pencil or brush, the attention to detail and photo realism is absolutely awe-inspiring. Take a look at our picks of the best of the bunch.

Temari balls faites par une dame de 92 ans These stunning embroidered balls called "temari" were made by the prodigiously nimble fingers of a 92-year-old grandmother in Japan. Although she only learned this elaborate skill in her sixties, she has since created nearly 500 unique designs that have been photographed by her granddaughter NanaAkua. Impressive does not even begin to describe this feat of dexterity, imagination and keen eyesight. The difficult process of becoming a recognized temari craftsman in Japan is tedious and requires specific training and testing. She now volunteers every week teaching others how to make their own temari. Temari, meaning "hand ball" in Japanese, are embroidered toy balls fashioned from the silk scraps of old kimonos.

The Little-Known Art of J.R.R. Tolkein by Maria Popova An important side of the beloved writer, who was as much an artist of pictures as he was of words. Storytelling icon J.R.R. Tolkien (January 3, 1892–September 2, 1973) was also among those rare creators with semi-secret talents in a discipline other than their primary realm of fame — but while his original sketches for the first edition of The Hobbit have seen the light of day in recent years, few realize that Tolkien, who self-illustrated many of his famous works, was as much an artist of pictures as he was of words. Unlike other famous authors who also drew but only as a hobby or diversion, including Sylvia Plath, William Faulkner, and Flannery O’Connor, Tolkien approached the visual medium with as much thoughtfulness and imaginative rigor as he did his stories.

Effets de Miroir - Daniel Kukla Daniel Kukla is a photographer who had formal training in biological and anthropological sciences. His educational background plays a major part of his artistic practice, and this can be seen in his clever project titled, The Edge Effect. In the description and explanation of the project, Kukla writes, In March of 2012, I was awarded an artist’s residency by the United States National Park Service in southern California’s Joshua Tree National Park. While staying in the Park, I spent much of my time visiting the borderlands of the park and the areas where the low Sonoran desert meets the high Mojave desert. While hiking and driving, I caught glimpses of the border space created by the meeting of distinct ecosystems in juxtaposition, referred to as the Edge Effect in the ecological sciences.

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