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Open-source software

Open-source software
Open-source software (OSS) is computer software with its source code made available and licensed with a license in which the copyright holder provides the rights to study, change and distribute the software to anyone and for any purpose.[1] Open-source software is very often developed in a public, collaborative manner. Open-source software is the most prominent example of open-source development and often compared to (technically defined) user-generated content or (legally defined) open-content movements.[2] A report by the Standish Group (from 2008) states that adoption of open-source software models has resulted in savings of about $60 billion per year to consumers.[3][4] Definitions[edit] The Open Source Initiative's (OSI) definition is recognized[who?] as the standard or de facto definition. OSI uses The Open Source Definition to determine whether it considers a software license open source. Proliferation of the term[edit] Open software licensing[edit] Certifications[edit] Early releases

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Open-source_software

Related:  saturOPEN SOURCEAbbreviations & their meaning

13 Must-See Stargazing Eventsof 2013 As 2012 comes to a close, some might wonder what is looming sky-wise for 2013.What celestial events might we look forward to seeing? I’ve selected what I consider the top 13"skylights" (get it?) for the coming year, and have listed them in chronological order. Not all these night sky events will be visible from any one locality (you may have to travel to catch all the eclipses), but you can observe many of them from the comfort of your backyard, weather permitting. The next year also promises two potentially bright comets: PANSTARRS and ISON. Open source hardware Open source hardware consists of physical artifacts of technology designed and offered by the open design movement. Both free and open source software (FOSS) as well as open source hardware is created by this open source culture movement and applies a like concept to a variety of components. The term usually means that information about the hardware is easily discerned. Hardware design (i.e. mechanical drawings, schematics, bills of material, PCB layout data, HDL source code and integrated circuit layout data), in addition to the software that drives the hardware, are all released with the FOSS approach.

Uniform resource name A uniform resource identifier (URI) is a uniform resource locator (URL), uniform resource name (URN), or both. Since RFC 3986 in 2005, the use of the term has been deprecated in favor of the less-restrictive "URI", a view proposed by a joint working group between the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF). Both URNs and uniform resource locators (URLs) are URIs, and a particular URI may be a name and a locator at the same time. URNs were originally intended in the 1990s to be part of a three-part information architecture for the Internet, along with URLs and uniform resource characteristics (URCs), a metadata framework.

AFGROW AFGROW (Air Force Grow) is a Damage Tolerance Analysis (DTA) framework that allows users to analyze crack initiation, fatigue crack growth, and fracture to predict the life of metallic structures. Originally developed by The Air Force Research Laboratory, AFGROW is mainly used for aerospace applications, but can be applied to any type of metallic structure that experiences fatigue cracking. AFGROW is now being independently developed and maintained by LexTech, Inc. Hardware The Holidays Why Not Open Source 209681 It's the quiet week of the holidays. What better time to contemplate open source hardware? Just think, every design of every little component has a nonrestrictive open source license. It's enough to bring a Yuletide tear to your eye.

Open source In production and development, open source as a development model promotes a universal access via free license to a product's design or blueprint, and b) universal redistribution of that design or blueprint, including subsequent improvements to it by anyone.[1][2] Researchers view open source as a specific case of the greater pattern of Open Collaboration, "any system of innovation or production that relies on goal-oriented yet loosely coordinated participants, who interact to create a product (or service) of economic value, which they make available to contributors and non-contributors alike".[3] Before the phrase open source became widely adopted, developers and producers used a variety of other terms. Open source gained hold with the rise of the Internet, and the attendant need for massive retooling of the computing source code.[4][page needed] Opening the source code enabled a self-enhancing diversity of production models, communication paths, and interactive communities.

Peer-to-peer file sharing Peer-to-peer file sharing is the distribution and sharing of digital documents and computer files using the technology of peer-to-peer (P2P) networking. P2P file sharing allows users to access media files such as books, music, movies, and games using a specialized P2P software program that searches for other connected computers on a P2P network and locates the desired content.[1] The nodes (peers) of such networks are end-user computer systems that are interconnected via the Internet. Several factors contributed to the widespread adoption and facilitation of peer-to-peer file sharing.

Uzebox Features[edit] Uzebox prototype connected to a TV and showing a game Hardware Specifications[edit] Uzebox AVCore's board described

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