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Personal learning network

A personal learning network is an informal learning network that consists of the people a learner interacts with and derives knowledge from in a personal learning environment. In a PLN, a person makes a connection with another person with the specific intent that some type of learning will occur because of that connection.[1][2] The following is an excerpt from Dryden's and Vos' book on learning networks:[4] "For the first time in history, we know now how to store virtually all humanity's most important information and make it available, almost instantly, in almost any form, to almost anyone on earth. We also know how to do that in great new ways so that people can interact with it , and learn from it." Personal learning networks share a close association with the concept of personal learning environments. Aspects[edit] PLNs are becoming an important part of professional development in several fields with some businesses creating their own e-learning content and PLEs for their employees. Related:  PLN

My Classroom Observation | Open Websites During the course of the semester, I had the opportunity to observe a seasoned instructor at ESL services here at UT. The course that I observed was an Intermediate Reading and Discussion class. I felt very fortunate to have been able to observe this class. The instructor created an environment that was conducive to learning in which all the students appeared to feel at ease due to her warm, friendly personality and also because she was approachable and appeared to possess a genuine interest in hearing her students' opinions. One thing that I learned from this instructor related to planning and adapting those plans to fit the students' needs. The instructor made good use of authentic materials. I believe this instructor to be highly effective and someone to whom I can use as a model. Click here to view my Classroom Observaion in its entirety

How to Create a Robust and Meaningful Personal Learning Network [PLN] This post describes how educators can develop a personal learning network that supports meaningful and relevant learning. The MOOC, Education Technology & Media, etmooc, is used here as a working example of how to develop a PLN. “My Personal Learning Network is the key to keeping me up-to-date with all the changes that are happening in education and how technology can best support and engage today’s students.” Brian Metcalfe: teacher, blogger at lifelonglearners.com A visual image of participants in an open, online course- etmooc, which shows the potential to find and create personal connections as part of one’s PLN. (image credit: Alec Couros) I wrote a post recently about how to develop a personal learning environment [PLE], the need and benefits of doing so, for educators in particular. What is a PLN? Twitter 6×6 (Photo credit: Steve Woolf) Logo for etmooc from etmooc.org In the etmooc we are primarily using Google+ Community , Blackboard Collaborate and Twitter to interact. Resources

Infographic: #PLearning Framework (Part 2 of the Series) - Getting Smart by Guest Author - learning, personalized learning, plearning, students By: Justin DeLeon #PLearning Framework (Part 2 of the Series) first appeared on Education Elements on April 2, 2014. When you think of “personalized,” you probably think “unique,” “special,” and “just for me.” For the most part, we personalize as much of our lives as possible. We stock our cabinets and fridges with food based on our dietary needs and what we enjoy eating. Applying the idea of personalization to our phones or what we eat is fairly straight-forward. Take a deep breath. Drivers: Needs and Goals What are the specific academic needs, interests and learning styles of each student? Learning Experience: Path, Pace and Pedagogy + Choice How do students’ needs and learning goals influence the design of students’ assessments and assignments? Operational Model What school and/or classroom model will support the students in advancing down their paths? Results How will you measure whether or not students’ needs are being met?

How To Create a ‘Personal Learning Environment’ to Stay Relevant in 2013 “Our understanding of learning has expanded at a rate that has far outpaced our conceptions of teaching. A growing appreciation for the porous boundaries between the classroom and life experience…has created not only promising changes but also disruptive moments in teaching.” EDUCAUSE Review, 2012 This quote from Disrupting Ourselves: The Problem of Learning in Higher Education (Bass, 2012), gives a good a reason as any for educators to develop a Personal learning Environment [PLE]; a space where we can keep up with the experimental modes of learning, instruction, changing pedagogy and instructional methods that surfaced in 2012. In a previous post I introduced the concept of PLEs and touched on why educators may want to consider developing a PLE for 2013. In this post I’ll outline how educators can develop their own PLE, where to start, and I’ll provide specific action steps, and what tools to use. We need to disrupt ourselves: The model of higher education is at a turning point.

Personal Learning Networks for Educators: 10 Tips - Getting Smart by Guest Author - edchat, EdTech, PLN By Dr. Mark Wagner I often begin my workshop on personal learning networks (PLN) for educators by asking these questions: Who is in your learning network? Who do you learn from on a regular basis? Who do you turn to for your own professional development? Some educators are lucky enough to learn from their coworkers or colleagues at their site. I usually ask these questions at conferences, which are frequently only annual events – and rare treats for many educators. Learning to Network and Networking to Learn 1. 2. 3. 4. Networking Tools and Anecdotes The four tips above are the core activities of building a personal learning network, and they can be applied using various tools to connect with others online. 5. 6. 7. 8. Final Thoughts These final two tips will help keep your initial frustrations in perspective, and help you avoid the temptation to focus on unimportant metrics as you grow your network. 9. 10. Note: I’ve also been writing about this topic for some time.

35 Ways To Build Your Personal Learning Network Online Personal learning networks are a great way for educators to get connected with learning opportunities, access professional development resources, and to build camaraderie with other education professionals. Although PLNs have been around for years, in recent years social media has made it possible for these networks to grow exponentially. Now, it’s possible to expand and connect your network around the world anytime, anywhere. But how exactly do you go about doing that? Check out our guide to growing your personal learning network with social media, full of more than 30 different tips, ideas, useful resources, and social media tools that can make it all possible. Tips & Ideas Get started developing your social media PLN with these tips and ideas for great ways to make use of social tools. Actively make ties : It’s not enough to just follow and read, you need to connect. Guides Tools & Resources Want to really make the most of your PLN?

Intro to communities of practice The term “community of practice” is of relatively recent coinage, even though the phenomenon it refers to is age-old. The concept has turned out to provide a useful perspective on knowing and learning. A growing number of people and organizations in various sectors are now focusing on communities of practice as a key to improving their performance.This brief and general introduction examines what communities of practice are and why researchers and practitioners in so many different contexts find them useful as an approach to knowing and learning. What are communities of practice? Note that this definition allows for, but does not assume, intentionality: learning can be the reason the community comes together or an incidental outcome of member’s interactions. The domain: A community of practice is not merely a club of friends or a network of connections between people. It is the combination of these three elements that constitutes a community of practice. Where does the concept come from?

Why (And How) You Should Create A Personal Learning Network What Is A PLN? Through the use of my own Personal Learning Network (PLN) , I came across several great examples that both define what a PLN is, and explain the value of creating one for yourself. According to a wikispace about creating PLNs, “Personal Learning Networks are systems that help learners take control of and manage their own learning. 1) set their own learning goals 2) manage their learning; managing both content and process 3) communicate with others in the process of learning and thereby achieve learning goals Simply put: A PLN is a system for lifelong learning. ” Why Start Your PLN Now? Teachers in our district, especially freshmen teachers, have a ton on their plates this year. Here are some ways that educators are using their PLNs: 10 Easy Ways to Kick Start Your Personal Learning Network Thanks to a fellow blogger/teacher named Kate Klingensmith, here’s a directory of some resources you can use to start developing your own community of connections and resources: Resources

Stages of PLN adoption David Warlick wrote a post the other day about being able to zip up or turn off your Personal Learning Network (PLN). I too have been thinking about how one goes about starting a PLN, how do you monitor it, and how do you learn to shut it off. We all continue to push teachers to start PLNs if they haven’t already. Learning from the collective knowledge of educators around the world. I have noticed an emerging trend of what one goes through when adopting a PLN for the first time. As I’ve helped others start their PLNs I have found that many of them go through these same stages. Stages of Personal Learning Networks Adoption Stage 1 Immersion: Immerse yourself into networks. Stage 2 Evaluation: Evaluate your networks and start to focus in on which networks you really want to focus your time on. Stage 3 Know it all: Find that you are spending many hours trying to learn everything you can. Stage 4 Perspective: Start to put your life into perspective. [tags]PLN[/tags]

Personal Learning Environments and the revolution of Vygotsky’s Zone of Proximal Development Developmental psychologist Lev Vygotsky defined what the person or a student can do — or the problems they can solve — as three different stages: What a student can do on their own, working independently or without anyone’s help.What the student can do with the help of someone.What it is beyond the student’s reach even if helped by someone else. He called the second stage the Zone of Proximal Development (ZPD) which had, as said, two limits: the lower limit, which was set by the maximum level of independent performance, and the upper limit, the maximum level of additional responsibility the student can accept with the assistance of an able instructor. But Vygotsky believed that learning shouldn’t follow development, but rather should lead it. This reaching beyond one’s capabilities can be pictured as the student entering their Zone of Proximal Development. The Personal Learning Environment and the Zone of Proximal Development: a static approach The future of educators?

How to build a professional learning community (no matter what job you have) - Daily Genius Let’s say you have a solid job that lets you have a great work-life balance. You get to do something you enjoy, have job security, and can take care of your family / self. Whatever that job is, you probably have it in the back of your mind that it might be worth … at some point … trying to get ahead. Maybe you want to learn a new skill and apply for that corner office job? What is that, you ask? See also: 10 social media mistakes you’re probably making In an effort to help you get ahead in life, we’ve built a simple but useful road-map for building a professional learning community.

Bridge to Learning - Educational Research Graham Attwell is Director of Pontydysgu. He is an Associate Fellow, Institute for Employment Research, University of Warwick and a Gastwissenschaftler at the Insititut Technik und Bildung, University of Bremen. Born in 1953 he has a BA (Hons) degree in History from the University of Wales: Swansea College. He was previously Director of the Centre for Research and Educational Development at Gwent Tertiary College (1993-1996) and a Senior Researcher at the University of Bremen (1996-9) His experience includes: Technology-enhanced teaching and learning and web-based learning environment development: Specialised in research and development into pedagogies for Technology Enhanced Learning, Pontydysgu has organised a series of face to face and on-line workshops for teachers in producing Open Education resources. Graham Attwell is also Maria’s favourite philospher.

Two Case Studies: How Connected Educators Can Transform Schools Figuring out which new teaching practices or pieces of technology might work in a classroom can feel like a full-time job. Lots of educators spend their free time researching new ideas and connecting with other educators, but there are plenty more that find the process confusing and overwhelming. How much easier would it be to have a dedicated staff person whose job is to bring new ideas into the district, support teachers and smooth the way with administrators? That’s what Kris Hupp does for Cornell School District, a tiny district in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. “Our teachers want to learn and try new technologies, but if they try something and it blows up in their faces no one is going to be upset.” The most important thing about his job is to create trust with both teachers and administrators who sometimes find themselves on opposite sides of labor disputes and budget issues, Hupp said. Hupp also runs a Professional Learning Community (PLC) of both teachers and administrators.

2009 Horizon Report » Two to Three Years: The Personal Web Time-to-Adoption Horizon: Two to Three Years Fifteen years after the first commercial web pages began to appear, the amount of content available on the web is staggering. Sifting through the sheer volume of material — good or bad, useful or otherwise — is a daunting task. It is even difficult to keep track of the media posted by a single person, or by oneself. On the other hand, adding to the mix is easier than ever before, thanks to easy-to-use publishing tools for every type and size of media. To cope with the problem, computer users are assembling collections of tools, widgets, and services that make it easy to develop and organize dynamic online content. Overview Part of a trend that began with simple innovations like personalized start pages, RSS aggregation, and customizable widgets, the personal web is a term coined to represent a collection of technologies that confer the ability to reorganize, configure and manage online content rather than just viewing it. Library Research.

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