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WW2 People's War

WW2 People's War
Related:  World War IIGm

Bomb Sight - Mapping the World War 2 London Blitz Bomb Census WW2 People's War - The London Blitz Holocaust Timeline Jump to: 1938 1939 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1933 January 30, 1933 - Adolf Hitler is appointed Chancellor of Germany a nation with a Jewish population of 566,000. February 22, 1933 - 40,000 SA and SS men are sworn in as auxiliary police. February 27, 1933 - Nazis burn Reichstag building to create crisis atmosphere. February 28, 1933 - Emergency powers granted to Hitler as a result of the Reichstag fire. March 22, 1933 - Nazis open Dachau concentration camp near Munich, to be followed by Buchenwald near Weimar in central Germany, Sachsenhausen near Berlin in northern Germany, and Ravensbrück for women. March 24, 1933 - German Parliament passes Enabling Act giving Hitler dictatorial powers. Terms of use: Private home/school non-commercial, non-Internet re-usage only is allowed of any text, graphics, photos, audio clips, other electronic files or materials from The History Place.

Bomb Sight - Mapping the World War 2 London Blitz Bomb Census With Bomb Sight you can discover what it was like in London, during WW2 Luftwaffe Blitz bombing raids, exploring maps, images and memories. The Bomb Sight web map and mobile app reveals WW2 bomb census maps between 7/10/1940 and 06/06/1941, previously available only by viewing them in the Reading Room of The National Archives. How to use the Map Use the search box to find a street or postcode of interest You can move around the map by clicking on the pan controls Use the zoom controls to change the detail on the map: Click the plus (+) to see more detail and click the minus (-) to see less map detail Use the layer button in the top left to explore the different types of map information that is available Click on individual bomb icons to find out more information Click on the to have a look at the map legend (this button is not available when viewing the website on a small screen) What information is available?

Proletarian posters from 1930s Japan In the 1930s, a new style of poster emerged that reflected the growing significance of the masses in Japanese society. These artistic posters borrowed elements from Western design and often incorporated bold slogans with political, economic and educational themes. Here are a few examples. Health Exercises for the People (Bureau of Postal Insurance, 1930) Tohoku Area Famine Relief (Federation of Tokyo Area Proletarian Organizations, 1931) The 2nd Proletarian Art Grand Exhibition (Japan Proletarian Artists Federation, 1929) Workers and Farmers Russian Art Exhibit (Japan Proletarian Art League, 1927) Listen! Safety Leads to Efficiency (Labor Welfare Association, 1932) Proletarian Art Institute (1930) Poster for The Proletarian Graph Magazine (Proletarian News Company, 1929) Indulging in Alcohol Ruins Your Health (Labor Welfare Association, 1932) Harufusa Ohashi (Election Poster for Labor-Farmer Party, 1928) Come, the Dawn of Mankind is Breaking (Farmers' Theater Performance, 1928) To Manchuria!

World War II History - World War II In North Africa, British and American forces had defeated the Italians and Germans by 1943. An Allied invasion of Sicily and Italy followed, and Mussolini’s government fell in July 1943, though Allied fighting against the Germans in Italy would continue until 1945. On World War II’s Eastern Front, a Soviet counteroffensive launched in November 1942 ended the bloody Battle of Stalingrad, which had seen some of the fiercest combat of the war. The approach of winter, along with dwindling food and medical supplies, spelled the end for German troops there, and the last of them surrendered on January 31, 1943. On June 6, 1944–celebrated as “D-Day”–the Allied began a massive invasion of Europe, landing 156,000 British, Canadian and American soldiers on the beaches of Normandy, France.

Operation Mincemeat and spycraft in World War Two : The New York On April 30, 1943, a fisherman came across a badly decomposed corpse floating in the water off the coast of Huelva, in southwestern Spain. The body was of an adult male dressed in a trenchcoat, a uniform, and boots, with a black attaché case chained to his waist. His wallet identified him as Major William Martin, of the Royal Marines. It did not take long for word of the downed officer to make its way to German intelligence agents in the region. The Germans did not realize—until it was too late—that “William Martin” was a fiction. The story of Major William Martin is the subject of the British journalist Ben Macintyre’s brilliant and almost absurdly entertaining “Operation Mincemeat” (Harmony; $25.99). To fashion the container that would keep the corpse “fresh,” before it was dumped off the coast of Spain, Mincemeat’s planners turned to Charles Fraser-Smith, whom Ian Fleming is thought to have used as the model for Q in the James Bond novels. Cicero, it turned out, was the real thing.

Bataille d'Angleterre: les «few» du Québec | Paul-Robert Raymond | Société Joseph Émile Paul Larichelière, né à Montréal en 1912, a réussi à abattre six avions ennemis : deux Messerschmitt Bf 110 et un Messerschmitt Bf 109 le 13 août 1940, ainsi que deux autres Bf 110 et un Junkers Ju 87 - le fameux bombardier en piqué Stuka - deux jours plus tard. Malheureusement pour lui, Larichelière, âgé de 27 ans, fut porté disparu le 16 août alors qu'il effectuait une mission à bord de son avion Hurricane, au large de l'île de Portland, dans la région du Dorset. Le pilote, membre du 213e Escadron de la Royal Air Force (RAF), a reçu son titre d'as - remis aux pilotes ayant abattu cinq avions ennemis et plus - et la Distinguished Flying Cross (DFC) à titre posthume. Il faisait partie des quelques pilotes des pays membres du Commonwealth (et d'autres pays) qui ont combattu durant la bataille d'Angleterre. Sur les 2353 aviateurs britanniques - que Winston Churchill appelait «le petit nombre» Outre M. Durant la bataille d'Angleterre, M. Le tableau de chasse de M. Quant à M.

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