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Nine Tenets of Passion-Based Learning

Nine Tenets of Passion-Based Learning
Culture Island School The Island School, a public school in New York City, embodies passion-based learning. By Kimberly Vincent We hear a lot about “passion-based” learning, and although in theory it sounds ideal, there are many factors to consider in building an education system around something as intangible as passion. A recent Future of Education talk addressed the topic, with experts in the field weighing in. REACH OUT TO THE DISENFRANCHISED. Explore: future of education, John Seely Brown, Lisa Nielsen, passion-based learning, Steve Hargadon

http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2011/07/nine-tenets-of-passion-based-learning/

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How to Reinvent Project Based Learning to Be More Meaningful By Thom Markham This is a crucial time for education. Every system in every country is in the process of figuring out how to reboot education to teach skills, application, and attitude in addition to recall and understanding. Helping students be able to grapple with increased problem solving and inquiry, be better critical and creative thinkers, show greater independence and engagement, and exhibit skills as presenters and collaborators is the challenge of the moment. That’s why so many educators are using the project based learning (PBL) model. The Complete Educator’s Guide to Using Skype effectively in the classroom Increasingly, educators globally are transforming their classroom using Skype to create powerful, authentic, motivating learning experiences for their students. From connecting with classrooms in other locations to learning about each others’ culture to connecting with content experts – educators are extending learning beyond classroom walls. So how do you use Skype effectively with your class?

Fuel Creativity in the Classroom with Divergent Thinking Recently, I showed a group of students in my high school art class a film called Ma Vie En Rose (My Life in Pink), about a seven-year-old boy named Ludovic who identifies as female. Ludovic has an active imagination, but is bullied by both adults and other kids who are unnerved by his desire to wear dresses and play with dolls. The film challenged my students to broaden their understanding of gender and identity and led to a discussion about ways in which our imaginations are limited when we are forced to be who we are not. It also reminded me of other examples in which character is forced to choose an identity, such as the movie Divergent, based on the popular trilogy of novels by Veronica Roth.

The Inquiry Process Explained Visually for Teachers Learning is all about being curious and inquisitive. It is a process in which learners explore the unknown through their senses using both sensory and motor skills. Being involved and engaged in the learning task is the key to a successful learning journey and to elicit this kind of engagement from learners, teachers need to nurture a learning environment where students take responsibility for their learning and 'where they are only shown where to look but not told what to see'. Such environment definitely requires a solid approach and an informed strategy to learning one that is dubbed: inquiry-based learning. Inquiry-based learning is essential in developing the most solicited 21st century skills : problem solving and critical thinking.As a teacher, you might be wondering about ways to inculcate the precepts of strategy into your teaching and lesson planning.

Support Material: Reading and Analyzing Nonfiction (RAN) Chart This support material is incorporated into critical challenges at grade 6, however, it can be adapted for use at all grade levels. The following document can be adapted and re-saved for your needs. RAN Chart A Design Research Methodology for Online Learning Course Design (#edumooc) For all the #edumooc'ers out there, I apologize that most of the references in this piece are of academic nature, and therefore are not in the public domain. Below are key excerpts from a synthesis paper I wrote about design research. I see now that the methodology that I propose would also easily apply to the development of online learning – in fact, I actually use this methodology somewhat informally as I design and re-design various iterations of one of the online courses that I teach. If you find this useful, or plan to use this methodology, please leave me a comment.

The 15-Minute Daily Habit That Will Change Your Career Growing up in rural Circleville, Ohio, in the '80s and '90s, Austin Kleon couldn't have known how the social networks of the future would enable him to easily connect to the writers and artists who were his heroes at the time. But the artist, recent SXSW keynote speaker, and author of Show Your Work! 10 Ways to Share Your Creativity and Get Discovered, was still eager for ways to interact with those worlds. At 13, he wrote to punk collage artist Winston Smith, who responded with a 14-page letter, the first exchange in years of correspondence. Last year, Smith was doing an open studio in San Francisco, and the two met in person--this time as peers. "The best thing about putting your work out in the world is that sometimes you get lucky and get to meet your heroes," says Kleon.

Educational Technology and Mobile Learning: 6 Great Videos on Teaching Critical Thinking Critical thinking is a skill that we can teach to our students through exercise and practice. It is particularly a skill that contains a plethora of other skills inside it. Critical thinking in its basic definition refers" to a diverse range of intellectual skills and activities concerned with evaluating information as well as evaluating our thought in a disciplined way ". All of our students think in a way or another but the question is , do they really think critically ? are they able to evaluate the information they come across ? are they capable of going beyond the surface thinking layer ?

Angela Maiers at BIF9: Whispering to the World The room is the smartest person in the 21st century, but only if every person in the room contributes everything they have. Instead, we are told growing up that we don't matter and we stop contributing. Angela Maiers, Founder and CEO of Maiers Educational Services, tells the story of how a classroom of students went from believing that they don't matter to believing that their contribution can change the world. Five Common Pitfalls of Online Course Design July 6, 2011 By: Elizabeth St. Germain in Online Education Much of what passes for an “online course” these days could more accurately be described as the electronic version of class hand-outs. These courses usually consist of a course description, a syllabus, lecture notes, reading lists, and assignment checklists. In other words, whatever materials a student might have viewed on paper in the past are now read onscreen, and whatever presentations a student might have watched in the classroom are now observed on their screen.

Co-Creative Processes in Education: The Small Things That Make a Big Difference Posted by core jr | 10 Mar 2014 | Comments (0) This is the third article in an ongoing series about working with kids by Copenhagen-based architect/designer/educator Moa Dickmark. Her last article was on the Future of Learning Environments. There are a few things that one should think about when it comes to working on a project using co-creative processes. There are the basics, such as how you develop and structure them, and then there's the small things that make the process go more smoothly. Sometimes these small things end up making a big difference, so I'm going to let you in on some of the ones that my colleague and I use more or less every time we are out working.

Ten Things I've Learned in Going Project-Based It's a few days before Christmas and I expect a challenge. Students will be checked-out or hyper. However, to my surprise, they are fully engaged in a project that combines reading, writing, global awareness and critical thinking. I've mentioned before that this year has been challenging. However, I am realizing that my students excel when I approach a subject with a project-based framework. In past years, I started with a full project-based approach.

Teaching Students How to Conduct Inquiry-Driven Research If we knew what it was we were doing, it would not be called research, would it?- Albert Einstein Teaching Students How to Conduct Inquiry-Driven Research It always starts with a question. Most of the time there is a simple answer to that question.

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