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Teachers as Leaders:Ten Roles for Teacher Leaders

Teachers as Leaders:Ten Roles for Teacher Leaders

Howard Gardner, multiple intelligences and education Howard Gardner, multiple intelligences and education. Howard Gardner’s work around multiple intelligences has had a profound impact on thinking and practice in education – especially in the United States. Here we explore the theory of multiple intelligences; why it has found a ready audience amongst educationalists; and some of the issues around its conceptualization and realization. Contents: introduction · howard gardner – a life · howard gardner on multiple intelligences · the appeal of multiple intelligences · are there additional intelligences? I want my children to understand the world, but not just because the world is fascinating and the human mind is curious. Howard Earl Gardner’s (1943- ) work has been marked by a desire not to just describe the world but to help to create the conditions to change it. One of the main impetuses for this movement has been Howard Gardner’s work. Howard Gardner – a life Howard Gardner was born in Scranton, Pennsylvania in 1943. Mindy L. Conclusion

The Key to Learning: A Place for Meaningful Academic Exploration Projects, portfolios, and presentations rule a school founded on Howard Gardner's theory of multiple intelligences. VIDEO: The Key Learning Community: Cultivating Multiple Intelligences Running Time: 9 min. In his kindergarten year, Max's interest in the degree of heat on Venus led him to create a gigantic cardboard thermometer that compared the temperature of tap water, soup, chocolate chip cookies, his own body, the surface of Venus, and other items. Wearing full space suit regalia, he made a detailed presentation of the project to his classmates. When he was in first grade, Max did a project about the USS Yorktown, an aircraft carrier on which his grandfather had served. In fifth grade, Max researched and reported on the history of the Macintosh computer. Exploration and Development Principal Pat Bolaños helped found the Key Learning Community in part so that children could work to their strengths. Credit: Edutopia Working from Strengths Credit: Rich Clark Photography

Deep and Surface learning It is important to clarify what they are not. Although learners may be classified as “deep” or “surface”, they are not attributes of individuals: one person may use both approaches at different times, although she or he may have a preference for one or the other. They correlate fairly closely with motivation: “deep” with intrinsic motivation and “surface” with extrinsic, but they are not necessarily the same thing. Either approach can be adopted by a person with either motivation. There is a third form, known as the “Achieving” or strategic approach, which can be summarised as a very well-organised form of Surface approach, and in which the motivation is to get good marks. Time to 'fess up: I was that strategic learner. The features of Deep and Surface approaches can be summarised thus: (based on Ramsden, 1988) The Surface learner is trying to “suss out” what the teacher wants and to provide it, and is likely to be motivated primarily by fear of failure. Two other points: More on Marton

Why Arts Education Is Crucial, and Who's Doing It Best "Art does not solve problems, but makes us aware of their existence," sculptor Magdalena Abakanowicz has said. Arts education, on the other hand, does solve problems. Years of research show that it's closely linked to almost everything that we as a nation say we want for our children and demand from our schools: academic achievement, social and emotional development, civic engagement, and equitable opportunity. Involvement in the arts is associated with gains in math, reading, cognitive ability, critical thinking, and verbal skill. It has become a mantra in education that No Child Left Behind, with its pressure to raise test scores, has reduced classroom time devoted to the arts (and science, social studies, and everything else besides reading and math). This erosion chipped away at the constituencies that might have defended the arts in the era of NCLB -- children who had no music and art classes in the 1970s and 1980s may not appreciate their value now. Reviving Arts Education

Successful Learning: Peer Learning Many institutions of learning now promote instructional methods involving ‘active’ learning that present opportunities for students to formulate their own questions, discuss issues, explain their viewpoints, and engage in cooperative learning by working in teams on problems and projects. ‘Peer learning’ is a form of cooperative learning that enhances the value of student-student interaction and results in various advantageous learning outcomes. To realise the benefits of peer learning, teachers must provide ‘intellectual scaffolding’. Peer Learning Strategies To facilitate successful peer learning, teachers may choose from an array of strategies: Buzz Groups: A large group of students is subdivided into smaller groups of 4–5 students to consider the issues surrounding a problem. Critique sessions, role-play, debates, case studies and integrated projects are other exciting and effective teaching strategies that stir students’ enthusiasm and encourage peer learning. Successful Peer Learning

Richard Felder: Resources in Science and Engineering Education Richard Felder's Home Page Richard M. Felder Dr. Richard Felder and Rebecca Brent's blog. Interns - Tutor/Mentor Connection What is PBL? To help teachers do PBL well, we created a comprehensive, research-based model for PBL — a "gold standard" to help teachers, schools, and organizations to measure, calibrate, and improve their practice. In Gold Standard PBL, projects are focused on student learning goals and include Essential Project Design Elements:

» Use the Pygmalion Effect to Create a High Performing Team the awesome culture blog “High expectations are the key to everything.” - Sam Walton The Pygmalion Effect Study In the 1960s, Harvard psychology professor Robert Rosenthal teamed up with South San Francisco elementary school principal Lenore Jacobson to conduct what later became known as the Pygmalion Effect study. In the study, 20% of the students within each of 18 elementary school classrooms were randomly assigned to a ‘high achiever’ group, with the remaining 80% serving as the control group. The teachers in those classrooms were told that these particular students in the ‘high achiever’ group had a superior IQ; even though the students were in fact chosen at random. “When teachers expect students to do well and show intellectual growth, they do; when teachers do not have such expectations, performance and growth are not so encouraged and may in fact be discouraged in a variety of ways.” Marva Collins Pygmalion in Management J. “A manager’s expectations are key to a subordinate’s performance and development.” 1.

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