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Conditional Sentences Type I, II und III (Conditional Sentences, If-Clauses)

Conditional Sentences Type I, II und III (Conditional Sentences, If-Clauses)
Conditional Sentences are also known as Conditional Clauses or If Clauses. They are used to express that the action in the main clause (without if) can only take place if a certain condition (in the clause with if) is fulfilled. There are three types of Conditional Sentences. Conditional Sentence Type 1 → It is possible and also very likely that the condition will be fulfilled. Form: if + Simple Present, will-Future Example: If I find her address, I’ll send her an invitation. more on Conditional Sentences Type I ► Conditional Sentence Type 2 → It is possible but very unlikely, that the condition will be fulfilled. Form: if + Simple Past, Conditional I (= would + Infinitive) Example: If I found her address, I would send her an invitation. more on Conditional Sentences Type II ► Conditional Sentence Type 3 → It is impossible that the condition will be fulfilled because it refers to the past. Form: if + Past Perfect, Conditional II (= would + have + Past Participle) Exceptions Exceptions

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English Grammar Pill: How to use the future tenses correctly Many of you will know that I am a huge fan of mind maps and infographics. I think they are a colourful and imaginative way of showing language points whether they are grammar or lexis. I haven’t had the time to create my own mind maps, however I have made good use of the excellent resources available from my creative fellow teachers to help me with my posts. And today is no exception. During my research for this post, I came across this wonderful mind map created by Blog Educativo. The Participle Phrase Printer Fabulous! Recognize a participle phrase when you see one. A participle phrase will begin with a present or past participle. If the participle is present, it will dependably end in ing. Likewise, a regular past participle will end in a consistent ed.

Revising Simple Past,Used to and Would with some Engaging Activities This lesson has been designed as a next-day revision activity for B2 (Intermediate +) students. Aim: to consolidate the use of Past Simple, Used to and Would for past habits and routines. Level: B2 (Intermediate+) In this lesson you will find. Flashcard Rating: 4.0/5 (11 votes cast) List of Common Verb walk, run, play, sleep, read, write, jump, ride, talk, cry, laugh, climb, cook, wait, watch TV, dance, fight , fly drink, eat, listen, open, close, throw away, turn on, turn off, sing pull, push, think, win, give, wash, sit down, stand up, cut

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Does Speaking A Foreign Language Change Your Personality? My high school English teacher used to tell us stuff like, “Learning a foreign language changes you forever.” Despite being an obvious attempt to make us passionate about her subject, her words made sense to me — the kid who quoted obscure Buffy the Vampire Slayer lines and treated Alanis Morissette’s lyrics like the word of God. After all, without a basic understanding of the English language I couldn’t have done any of that, and all those beautiful imaginary friendships would have never blossomed. Then I made it to adulthood (I think) and experienced first-hand the perks of speaking a foreign language: hitting on exotic men (whilst still using Buffy references as pick up lines #ForeverAlone) and weaseling my way into more office gossip than ever before. Split of the online self

English for kids We offer hundreds of ready-to-print materials for presenting, practising and revising basic English vocabulary and grammar: reference cards, flashcards, worksheets, crossword and wordsearch puzzles, tests, quizzes, board / card games, song lyrics, holiday activities and crafts, and more. Enjoy!Terms of useYou are free to download, print and copy any resource from this site for your personal or classroom use only. Do not feel free, though, to alter, sell, or put them on another web site. So vs Such in English - An explanation of the difference with examples The following rules explain the difference between So and Such in English. So … that, Such … that We use so ... that, such ... that:

Ruth's story: One child refugee's journey from Eritrea to England - CBBC Newsround Ruth was 14 when she left her home country of Eritrea in east Africa. She didn't like the way she was being treated, so she embarked on a dangerous journey to the UK. Ruth has been telling Newsround's Hayley her story... Online Spelling Course Hello and Welcome to Appropriate for grade 6 to 8 level Note: It is best to take a look at the course outline and the spelling rules pages prior to beginning the lessons. The Course Outline, Spelling Rules, Lessons, Exercises, Dictation Exercises, and answer keys can be accessed from the Left-hand Navigation Bar. This free, thirty lesson spelling course has been made available courtesy of Marie Rackham, author and producer of The Basic Cozy Grammar Course, The Basic Cozy Punctuation Course, The Basic Cozy Essay Course, The Intermediate Cozy Grammar Course Level 1, The Intermediate Cozy Grammar Course Level 2, and The Cozy Classroom CD. Born and raised in North Vancouver, Marie earned degrees in English and Geography from the University of British Columbia.

Too or Enough Also See: Too vs Enough Exercise 2 Too It’s used to indicate that something is more or less than necessary.It always has a negative meaning. Structure: Downloadable resources - For teachers - Pearson Longman - best English courses. Christmas trees - for students Traditions of taking branches and leaves from trees into the home in the winter are very old indeed - much older, in fact, than Christmas. Christmas trees - for teachers Teacher instructions and answer key Da Vinci - for students

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