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Karpman drama triangle

Karpman drama triangle
Classic drama triangle[1] The drama triangle is a psychological and social model of human interaction in transactional analysis (TA) first described by Stephen Karpman, M.D., in his 1968 article "Fairy Tales and Script Drama Analysis".[3] The drama triangle model is used in psychology and psychotherapy.[4][5] The three roles[edit] The model posits three habitual psychological roles (or roleplays) which people often take in a situation: Of these, the rescuer is the least obvious role. In the terms of the drama triangle, the rescuer is not a person helping someone in an emergency. ... the Victim is not really as helpless as he feels, the Rescuer is not really helping, and the Persecutor does not really have a valid complaint.[6] The situation plays out when a situation arises and a person takes a role as victim or persecutor. Melodrama often features a central, triangle cast. Rescuer[edit] Overview and theory[edit] Three quantitative variables are often useful to consider for games:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karpman_drama_triangle

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