background preloader

Center for Biological Diversity

Center for Biological Diversity
Related:  ASSOCIATIONS DE PROTECTION DES ANIMAUX

IGF Rights of Mother Earth - Gaia Psychology Rights of Mother Earth Proposal Universal Declaration of the Rights of Mother Earth Preamble We, the peoples and nations of Earth: considering that we are all part of Mother Earth, an indivisible, living community of interrelated and interdependent beings with a common destiny; gratefully acknowledging that Mother Earth is the source of life, nourishment and learning and provides everything we need to live well; recognizing that the capitalist system and all forms of depredation, exploitation, abuse and contamination have caused great destruction, degradation and disruption of Mother Earth, putting life as we know it today at risk through phenomena such as climate change; convinced that in an interdependent living community it is not possible to recognize the rights of only human beings without causing an imbalance within Mother Earth; conscious of the urgency of taking decisive, collective action to transform structures and systems that cause climate change and other threats to Mother Earth;

Microbial Life - Educational Resources Teaching and learning about the diversity, ecology and evolution of the microbial world; discover the connections between microbial life, the history of the earth and our dependence on micro-organisms. The expansive Sunset Lake of the Black Sand Basin is one of the largest thermal bodies of water in Yellowstone National Park. Details This site contains a variety of educational and supporting materials for students and teachers of microbiology. Microbial Life in Extreme Environments: Mammoth Terraces, Yellowstone National Park. Microbial Life in Marine Environments: Pancake ice in Ross Sea, Antarctica. Find out more about the myriad of microorganisms that live in marine environments. Microbial Observatories: MO study site at Conch Reef, Key Largo. Explore profiles of several microbial observatories, NSF-funded projects dedicated to the discovery and characterization of novel microorganisms and microbial communities of diverse environments. Research Methods: Euastrum agalma. Micro*scope:

UNEP-WCMC Top 10 Most Dangerous Plants in the World 1. Most likely to eat a rat Giant Pitcher Plant: Nepenthes attenboroughii Discovered more than 5000 feet above sea level on Mount Victoria in the Philippines, the giant, carnivorous pitcher plant secretes a nectar-like substance to lure unsuspecting prey into a pool of enzymes and acid. A series of sticky, downward ribs makes it nearly impossible for trapped prey to escape. The plant's 30-centimeter diameter is large enough to trap unlucky rodents, but insects are its most common meal. 2. Castor Bean Plant: Ricinus communis Castor-bean plants can be purchased at just about any garden center, despite containing the deadly poison ricin. 3. Western Water Hemlock: Cicuta douglasii Deemed the most "violently toxic plant that grows in North America" by the USDA, the water hemlock contains the toxin cicutoxin, which wreaks havoc on the central nervous system, causing grand mal seizures--which include loss of consciousness and violent muscle contractions--and eventually death, if ingested. 4. 5.

Tree of Life Web Project The Tree of Life Web Project (ToL) is a collaborative effort of biologists and nature enthusiasts from around the world. On more than 10,000 World Wide Web pages, the project provides information about biodiversity, the characteristics of different groups of organisms, and their evolutionary history (phylogeny). Each page contains information about a particular group, e.g., salamanders, segmented worms, phlox flowers, tyrannosaurs, euglenids, Heliconius butterflies, club fungi, or the vampire squid. The Environmentalist Wikispecies - the species directory Cell Size and Scale Some cells are visible to the unaided eye The smallest objects that the unaided human eye can see are about 0.1 mm long. That means that under the right conditions, you might be able to see an ameoba proteus, a human egg, and a paramecium without using magnification. A magnifying glass can help you to see them more clearly, but they will still look tiny. Smaller cells are easily visible under a light microscope. To see anything smaller than 500 nm, you will need an electron microscope. Adenine The label on the nucleotide is not quite accurate. How can an X chromosome be nearly as big as the head of the sperm cell? No, this isn't a mistake. The X chromosome is shown here in a condensed state, as it would appear in a cell that's going through mitosis. A chromosome is made up of genetic material (one long piece of DNA) wrapped around structural support proteins (histones). Carbon The size of the carbon atom is based on its van der Waals radius.

Association pour la sauvegarde de la biodiversité TENDUA a été créée en 2008, après un voyage en Inde où, en dépit de nombreux parcs nationaux, la faune sauvage et ses habitats sont menacés. Le constat est malheureusement planétaire : partout dans le monde, la biodiversité est en danger, sur terre et dans les mers. La 6e extinction majeure de biodiversité est en cours : en 150 ans l’homme a réussi à détruire son environnement comme il ne l’avait jamais fait auparavant. Les précédentes extinctions connues des scientifiques étaient le résultat d’un processus évolutionnaire ; or aujourd’hui, l’équilibre de la planète est menacé par les activités humaines. En août 2013, il a été estimé que l’humanité, par sa consommation effrénée, a dépassé la capacité de régénération de la Terre. Cela étant, nous n’avons plus le temps d’être pessimistes. Une nouvelle relation entre l’homme et la nature TENDUA propose à chacun de réfléchir à un nouveau type de relation entre l’homme et la nature. Adhésions et partenariats Comment adhérer ?

Related: