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What Kids Should Know About Their Own Brains

What Kids Should Know About Their Own Brains
Getty Neuroscience may seem like an advanced subject of study, perhaps best reserved for college or even graduate school. Two researchers from Temple University in Philadelphia propose that it be taught earlier, however—much earlier. As in first grade. In a study published in this month’s issue of the journal Early Education and Development, psychologists Peter Marshall and Christina Comalli began by surveying children aged four to 13 to discover what they already knew about the brain. Previous research had found that elementary school pupils typically have a limited understanding of the brain and how it functions, believing it to be something like “a container for storing memories and facts.” Marshall and Comalli’s questionnaire turned up the same uncertain grasp of the topic, which the researchers attributed to several factors. A 20-minute lesson about the brain was enough to improve knowledge of brain functioning. But the success of their effort opens another possibility.

http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2012/04/what-kids-should-know-about-their-own-brains/

Related:  Brain-Based LearningLärande,InstructionalNeuro Learning

Why Talking About the Brain Can Empower Learners Knowledge about how the brain works can make a big difference when confronting difficult learning situations. If you have a growth mindset and are aware of the ability to improve oneself, a challenge can be welcome (versus those with a fixed mindset who are averse to the failures a challenge may bring). Stanford University professor of psychology Carol Dweck, who has been leading the research in this field, discusses “The power of believing that you can improve” in this TED talk. In one example, she talks about students who made vast improvements on test scores once they learned about the growth mindset: “This happened because the meaning of effort and difficulty were transformed.

20 Collaborative Learning Tips And Strategies For Teachers 20 Collaborative Learning Tips And Strategies For Teachers by Miriam Clifford This post has been updated from a 2011 post. There is an age old adage that says “two heads are better than one”. For Teenage Brains, the Importance of Continuing to Learn Deeply Big Ideas Daniel Horowitz for NPR By Shankar Vedantam, NPR

How Does the Brain Learn Best? Smart Studying Strategies In his new book, “How We Learn: The Surprising Truth about When, Where, and Why It Happens,” author Benedict Carey informs us that “most of our instincts about learning are misplaced, incomplete, or flat wrong” and “rooted more in superstition than in science.” That’s a disconcerting message, and hard to believe at first. But it’s also unexpectedly liberating, because Carey further explains that many things we think of as detractors from learning — like forgetting, distractions, interruptions or sleeping rather than hitting the books — aren’t necessarily bad after all.

Studying With Quizzes Helps Make Sure the Material Sticks iStock By Samara Freemark, American RadioWorks Roddy Roediger is a psychology professor at Washington University in St. Louis and runs the school’s Memory Lab. He’s been obsessed with studying how and why people remember things for four decades. About 20 years ago, Roediger was running an experiment on how images help people remember. Defining Collaborative Teaching If only Teacher A and Teacher B could check their calendars and begin scheduling weekly meetings they could create a true collaborative relationship. Together, they would begin to construct fully structured bridges between their curriculums that would not only bring them deep professional satisfaction, more importantly; they would enrich the learning experiences of their students. Try to picture the collaborative environment Teacher A and Teacher B could produce. Can you see each teacher bringing their respective curriculum guides to their first meeting? Teacher A reads her American Revolution standard and all the related benchmarks and learning outcomes. Teacher B scans his skill based curriculum and finds reading, writing, speaking, and research benchmarks which could be easily met through Teacher A’s curriculum.

Brains, Brains, Brains! How the Mind of a Middle Schooler Works In honor of October's most awesome of holidays, I am going to begin a three-part series about the gentlemen zombie's choice of cuisine: the 'tween brain. However, I need to be frank. I'm not going to be able to teach you deeply about the 'tween brain here. I'm not a neurologist. What I am going to do is make an argument, hopefully a darn good one, as to why you should educate yourself further about it. Imagine that this is the CliffNotes of 'tween brain research, but your research should not stop at this because, frankly, the more you know about how they learn, the more you can pass on to them the secrets of how they process and embed knowledge.

How Learning Art Alters Brain Structure by Natalie Shoemaker The notion that “you either have it or you don't” in the art world may be exaggerated. Certainly, some may be drawn to take up the brush more than others, but creativity isn't something that's encoded in your genes, and a new study published in NeuroImage proves it so. Tim Jacobs from Pacific Standard has written up a summary on the research showing evidence that just taking a sketching class can alter our brains' white matter to boost creative thinking. Lead author of the paper, Alexander Schlegel, said of the results: "Creativity is another concept that is often thought of as something we are either born with or will never have. What’s Going on Inside the Brain Of A Curious Child? By Maanvi Singh, NPR How does a sunset work? We love to look at them, but Jolanda Blackwell wanted her 8th graders to really think about them, to wonder and question. So Blackwell, who teaches science at Oliver Wendell Holmes Junior High in Davis, Calif., had her students watch a video of a sunset on YouTube as part of a physics lesson on motion. “I asked them: ‘So what’s moving?

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