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Post-scarcity economy

Post-scarcity economy
This would require a sophisticated system of resource recycling, in conjunction with advanced productive technology that enables conditions of material abundance, such as automated systems capable of converting raw materials into finished goods[not verified in body], which in turn enable the free distribution[2] of most or all economic output and the common ownership of the means of production used therefor. The scarcity model[edit] Scarcity is the fundamental economic assumption of having seemingly unlimited human needs and wants in a world of limited resources. Society has insufficient productive resources to fulfill all human wants and needs. Alternatively, scarcity implies that not all of society's goals can be pursued at the same time; trade-offs are made of one good against others. As such, the term "post-scarcity economics" may be somewhat paradoxical. However, in classical Marxian economics, scarcity is said to be peripheral. Post-scarcity economics[edit] Means[edit] Effects[edit] Related:  Do You Even Need a Job? Screw It!

Abundance Abundance may refer to: In science and technology: In literature: In business: Abundance Generation, a renewable energy investment platform See also: Resource recovery Resource recovery is the selective extraction of disposed materials for a specific next use, such as recycling, composting or energy generation. The aim of the resource recovery is to extract the maximum practical benefits from products, delay the consumption of virgin natural resources, and to generate the minimum amount of waste. Resource recovery differs from the management of waste by using life cycle analysis (LCA) to offer alternatives to landfill disposal of discarded materials. Recycling[edit] Recycling is a resource recovery practice that refers to the collection and reuse of disposed materials such as empty beverage containers. The most common consumer products recycled include aluminium such as beverage cans, copper such as wire, steel food and aerosol cans, old steel furnishings or equipment, polyethylene and PET bottles, glass bottles and jars, paperboard cartons, newspapers, magazines and light paper, and corrugated fiberboard boxes. Biological processing[edit]

Reliable Prosperity Working time Standard working hours (or normal working hours) refers to the legislation to limit the working hours per day, per week, per month or per year. If an employee needs to work overtime, the employer will need to pay overtime payments to employees as required in the law. Generally speaking, standard working hours of countries worldwide are around 40 to 44 hours per week (but not everywhere: from 35 hours pw in France[3] to up to 112 hours pw in North Korea labour camp [4]), and the additional overtime payments are around 25% to 50% to the normal hourly payments. Maximum working hours refers to the maximum working hours of an employee. The employee cannot work more than the level specified in the maximum working hours law.[5] Hunter-gatherer[edit] Since the 1960s, the consensus among anthropologists, historians, and sociologists has been that early hunter-gatherer societies enjoyed more leisure time than is permitted by capitalist and agrarian societies;[10][11] For instance, one camp of !

Neighbourhood A neighbourhood (Commonwealth English), or neighborhood (American English), is a geographically localised community within a larger city, town, suburb or rural area. Neighbourhoods are often social communities with considerable face-to-face interaction among members. "Researchers have not agreed on an exact definition. Neighbourhood is generally defined spatially as a specific geographic area and functionally as a set of social networks. Preindustrial cities[edit] Neighbourhoods are typically generated by social interaction among people living near one another. In addition to social neighbourhoods, most ancient and historical cities also had administrative districts used by officials for taxation, record-keeping, and social control.[7] Administrative districts are typically larger than neighbourhoods and their boundaries may cut across neighbourhood divisions. Neighbourhoods in preindustrial cities often had some degree of social specialisation or differentiation. Sociology[edit] Notes

Regenerative design Regenerative design is a process-oriented systems theory based approach to design. The term "regenerative" describes processes that restore, renew or revitalize their own sources of energy and materials, creating sustainable systems that integrate the needs of society with the integrity of nature. The basis is derived from systems ecology with a closed loop input–output model or a model in which the output is greater than or equal to the input with all outputs viable and all inputs accounted for. Regenerative design is the biomimicry of ecosystems that provide for all human systems to function as a closed viable ecological economics system for all industry. It parallels ecosystems in that organic (biotic) and synthetic (abiotic) material is not just metabolized but metamorphosed into new viable materials. History[edit] During the late 1970s, John T. Swiss architect Walter R. Regenerative versus sustainable[edit] There is also a linguistic problem with the word "sustainable."

Appropedia Medieval peasants got more vacation time than you Life for the medieval peasant was certainly no picnic. His life was shadowed by fear of famine, disease and bursts of warfare. His diet and personal hygiene left much to be desired. But despite his reputation as a miserable wretch, you might envy him one thing: his vacations. Plowing and harvesting were backbreaking toil, but the peasant enjoyed anywhere from eight weeks to half the year off. As for the modern American worker? It wasn’t supposed to turn out this way: John Maynard Keynes, one of the founders of modern economics, made a famous prediction that by 2030, advanced societies would be wealthy enough that leisure time, rather than work, would characterize national lifestyles. What happened? Fast-forward to the 21st century, and the U.S. is the only advanced country with no national vacation policy whatsoever. Some blame the American worker for not taking what is her due. Ironically, this cult of endless toil doesn’t really help the bottom line.

Subsidiarity Subsidiarity is an organizing principle of decentralisation, stating that a matter ought to be handled by the smallest, lowest, or least centralised authority capable of addressing that matter effectively. The Oxford English Dictionary defines subsidiarity as the idea that a central authority should have a subsidiary function, performing only those tasks which cannot be performed effectively at a more immediate or local level. The concept is applicable in the fields of government, political science, neuropsychology, cybernetics, management and in military command (Mission Command). In political theory, subsidiarity is sometimes viewed as a principle entailed by the idea of federalism. Origin[edit] Political theory[edit] Alexis de Tocqueville's classic study, Democracy in America, may be viewed as an examination of the operation of the principle of subsidiarity in early 19th century America. General principle of European Union law[edit] Court of Justice[edit] See also[edit] References[edit]

Cradle-to-cradle design Cradle to Cradle design (also referred to as Cradle to Cradle, C2C, cradle 2 cradle, or regenerative design) is a biomimetic approach to the design of products and systems. It models human industry on nature's processes viewing materials as nutrients circulating in healthy, safe metabolisms. It suggests that industry must protect and enrich ecosystems and nature's biological metabolism while also maintaining a safe, productive technical metabolism for the high-quality use and circulation of organic and technical nutrients.[1] Put simply, it is a holistic economic, industrial and social framework that seeks to create systems that are not only efficient but also essentially waste free.[2] The model in its broadest sense is not limited to industrial design and manufacturing; it can be applied to many aspects of human civilization such as urban environments, buildings, economics and social systems. Introduction[edit] Biological and Technical Cycles Biological and technical cycle Health[edit]

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