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Stylometry

Stylometry
Stylometry is often used to attribute authorship to anonymous or disputed documents. It has legal as well as academic and literary applications, ranging from the question of the authorship of Shakespeare's works to forensic linguistics. History[edit] Stylometry grew out of earlier techniques of analyzing texts for evidence of authenticity, authorial identity, and other questions. The basics of stylometry were set out by Polish philosopher Wincenty Lutosławski in Principes de stylométrie (1890). Methods[edit] Modern stylometry draws heavily on the aid of computers for statistical analysis, artificial intelligence and access to the growing corpus of texts available via the Internet. Whereas in the past, stylometry emphasized the rarest or most striking elements of a text, contemporary techniques can isolate identifying patterns even in common parts of speech. Writer invariant[edit] The primary stylometric method is the writer invariant: a property of a text which is invariant of its author. Related:  Text Analytics

Graphing the history of philosophy « Drunks&Lampposts A close up of ancient and medieval philosophy ending at Descartes and Leibniz If you are interested in this data set you might like my latest post where I use it to make book recommendations. This one came about because I was searching for a data set on horror films (don’t ask) and ended up with one describing the links between philosophers. To cut a long story very short I’ve extracted the information in the influenced by section for every philosopher on Wikipedia and used it to construct a network which I’ve then visualised using gephi It’s an easy process to repeat. First I’ll show why I think it’s worked as a visualisation. Each philosopher is a node in the network and the lines between them (or edges in the terminology of graph theory) represents lines of influence. It gets more interesting when we use Gephi to identify communities (or modules) within the network. It has been fairly successful. The Continental Tradition The graph is probably most insightful when you zoom in close.

23 maps and charts on language by Dylan Matthews on April 15, 2015 "The limits of my language," the philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein once posited, "mean the limits of my world." Explaining everything within the limits of the world is probably too ambitious a goal for a list like this. But here are 23 maps and charts that can hopefully illuminate small aspects of how we manage to communicate with one another. The basics Indo-European language rootsMinna Sundberg, a Finnish-Swedish comic artist, created this beautiful tree to illustrate both the relationships between European and central Asian languages generally, as well as a smaller but still striking point: Finnish has less in common with, say, Swedish than Persian or Hindi do. Language divides Bilingualism Who in Europe speaks EnglishMany countries have more than one commonly used language, with many residents learning two or more. English American English

Analysis Jean Lievens: Wikinomics Model for Value of Open Data Categories: Analysis,Architecture,Balance,Citizen-Centered,Data,Design,Graphics,ICT-IT,Knowledge,Policies-Harmonization,Processing,Strategy-Holistic Coherence Jean Lievens A visual model showing the value of open data Prof. Visualize Business Models I bought the book Business Model Generation: A Handbook for Visionaries, Game Changers, and Challengers [72 slides free online at SlideShare] by Alexander Osterwalder. Second, the book itself has a new business model. Value Model of Open Data Read the rest of this entry » Apr 8 Graphic: Four Forces After Next with IO Updated Categories: Analysis,Balance,Budgets & Funding,Capabilities-Force Structure,ICT-IT,Multinational Plus,Policies-Harmonization,Strategy-Holistic Coherence,Threats,Tribes,True Cost Click on Image to Enlarge Citation: Robert David Steele, “Graphic: Four Forces After Next with IO Updated,” Phi Beta Iota Public Intelligence Blog (3 April 2013). Apr 3 See Also: Mar 26 Original Source

Mozilla Shortcuts Chrome users: see the Chrome shortcuts for your address bar for faster searches. You will create a bookmark, then add the "keyword". Once it is created, you can simply type "enfr dog", for example, to quickly translate "dog" from English to French. 1. 2. In "Keyword", add the abbreviation for the dictionary. enes, enfr, enit, ende, enpt, esen, fren, iten, deen, ptenesfr, espt, fres, ptes, en, es, sin conj For the monolingual dictionaries use "en" for English, "es" for the Spanish dictionary and "sin" for sinonimos. Done! Now you can search for words directly in the Location bar by typing the abbreviation and a word. *Mac users should ctrl-click if they cannot right-click. More dictionaries: I see a page saying: Bad Request - Invalid URL You need to right-click (or ctrl-click) the bookmark as explained in step 2. Problems?

Linguistics and the Book of Mormon According to most adherents of the Latter Day Saint movement, the Book of Mormon is a 19th-century translation of a record of ancient inhabitants of the American continent, which was written in a script which the book refers to as "reformed Egyptian."[1][2][3][4][5] This claim, as well as virtually all claims to historical authenticity of the Book of Mormon, are generally rejected by non–Latter Day Saint historians and scientists.[6][7][8][9][10] Linguistically based assertions are frequently cited and discussed in the context of the subject of the Book of Mormon, both in favor of and against the book's claimed origins. Both critics and promoters of the Book of Mormon have used linguistic methods to analyze the text. The problem with linguistic reviews of the Book of Mormon is that the claimed original text is either unavailable for study or never existed. Native American language-development[edit] In 1922, LDS Church general authority B. Linguistic anachronisms[edit] Critics[who?]

chrome Shortcuts Firefox users: see the Firefox shortcuts for your address bar for faster searches. You will create a bookmark, then add the "keyword". Once it is created, you can simply type "enfr dog", for example, to quickly translate "dog" from English to French. 1. Right-click* one of these links. Choose "Copy link address". 2. In "Name", type the name of the dictionary. In "Keyword", add the abbreviation for the dictionary. enes, enfr, enit, ende, enpt, esen, fren, iten, deen, ptenesfr, espt, fres, ptes, en, es, sin conj For the monolingual dictionaries use "en" for English, "es" for the Spanish dictionary and "sin" for sinonimos.. In URL, right-click and paste the URL that you copied from above. Click "OK", then "Close". Done! Now you can search for words directly in the Location bar by typing the abbreviation and a word. *Mac users should ctrl-click if they cannot right-click. More dictionaries: Problems?

The Signature Stylometric System The aim of this website is to highlight the many strong links between Philosophy and Computing, for the benefit of students of both disciplines: For students of Philosophy who are seeking ways into formal Computing, learning by discovery about programming, how computers work, language processing, artificial intelligence, and even conducting computerised thought experiments on philosophically interesting problems such as the evolution of co-operative behaviour. For students of Computing who are keen to see how their technical abilities can be applied to intellectually exciting and philosophically challenging problems. The links along the top of these web pages lead to the main sections of the website (click here for the next page in the "Home" section). This website is under development by Peter Millican, Fellow and Professor of Philosophy at Hertford College, Oxford University, who previously taught both Philosophy and Computing for 20 years at the University of Leeds.

Hyperlink JGAAP Linguaggi Specialistici in “XXI Secolo” di Riccardo Gualdo Linguaggi specialistici La definizione di linguaggi specialistici è forse quella oggi più in uso, ma non è certo l’unica e non ancora quella su cui concordano tutti gli studiosi (Gotti 2005, pp. 22-25; un esame delle diverse denominazioni, da lingue speciali a tecnoletti o microlingue, in Cavagnoli 2007, pp. 13-17). Ci sembra tuttavia preferibile per due ordini di ragioni: da un lato, se per lingua intendiamo, tipicamente, il codice comunicativo verbale esclusivo della specie umana, tra i linguaggi possiamo accogliere anche l’espressione di concetti mediante mezzi non verbali: simbolici, come per es. le formule; iconici, come diagrammi e grafici, illustrazioni, animazioni e filmati e così via. Tali distinzioni, ovviamente, rispondono soprattutto a esigenze di praticità: di fatto, tra i linguaggi specialistici e i linguaggi settoriali, così come tra questi e la lingua comune, i confini sono sfumati. Linguaggi specialistici e lingua comune La medicina

DiscoverText - A Text Analytic Toolkit for eDiscovery and Research Beautiful Word Clouds Concordance: software for concordancing and text analysis

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