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Writing Prompt: Get Into Character « Novel Novice

Writing Prompt: Get Into Character « Novel Novice
Welcome to Novel Novice’s Writing Prompts! Reading and writing go hand-in-hand: reading makes you a better writer, and writing makes you a better reader. Whether you’re aspiring to be a novelist, just having fun, or interested in trying your hand at writing, we welcome you to join in. Here’s how it will work: Prompts will be posted on the 1st of the month, every other month, Feb-Oct.Stories will be due 6 weeks later, on the 14th of the following month.Stories will be posted on the website for everyone to read, so that we can learn from each other.Each prompt will focus on a writing technique to help you sharpen your skills.Prompts are open-ended so that they may be used for fan fiction for any book/series. There is no judging, voting, or winners. To have funTo improve your writing skillsTo share your writing with others On to this month’s prompt…. The Focus: Ahhh…the age-old writing debate — what’s more important: characters or plot? Voice Every character has a distinct “voice”. World View Related:  creating characters

Character Trait Chart Character Trait Chart and Personality Components It can sometimes be helpful to make a Trait Chart for each character. This is especially helpful during the early stages of character development, before the character becomes as real to you as your mother. To use this chart, print it out and make a copy for each of your characters. Full name - a character's name is very important. Besides the character's official name, we also need to know what he is called (and, perhaps, what he prefers to be called). Date of Birth/Age - we should carefully consider assigning our character a birthday. Address - this can be as detailed or as vague as you wish, but it should answer a few questions: does the character live in a large city, the suburbs, a small town or deep in the country? Height - this doesn't need to be specific. Weight/Body Build - again, we don't really need to know a character's exact weight, only if he or she is stocky, slender or "had a figure that . . ." Smell - everyone has a smell.

A Plethora of Writing Prompts for Creative Writing and Journaling You already know that the best way to improve your writing is by reading, and by writing. But what should you write about? That’s where writing prompts come in. Having a list of prompts that you can pull from every day in order to help you practice your craft, even if it’s just for ten minutes a day, can be very helpful. Here, then, is a plethora of writing prompts to help you make the most of your writing time. 1. 2. 3. One of the illustrations is titled “Uninvited Guests”. 4. He had lived a quiet life as a baker for years, but his past had come back to haunt him. 5. 6. Examples of dystopian novels include the following: If you would like to try your hand at a dystopian novel, here’s an apocalypses generator to help give you some ideas, including the following: 7. 8. Some theme ideas include the following: Some story twist ideas include the following: 9. 10. 11. 12. In addition, Melissa has written a book containing “101 Creative Writing Exercises.” “Art begets art. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18.

Establishing the Right Point of View Establishing the Right Point of View: How to Avoid "Stepping Out of Character" by Marg Gilks Return to Characters, Viewpoint, and Names · Print/Mobile-Friendly Version "Dalquist was shaking with rage, tears streaking down her face. Yikes! If you can see what's wrong with this excerpt, congratulations. What's wrong with the above excerpt? Paragraph one is ambiguous. Every scene should have only one POV character, and everything must be filtered through that POV character's perceptions. But, isn't it so much easier just to tell the reader what character X is thinking, rather than trying to show it in ways the POV character (and thus, the reader) can see and understand? Let's look at that again, and we'll see a hint: isn't it so much easier just to tell the reader what character X is thinking, rather than trying to show it in ways the POV character can see and understand? Yup: "show, don't tell." Yup: characterization. "Lexas didn't turn around. There's no confusion here. Find Out More...

Dystopia « Young and Writerly Dystopian fiction is really hot right now. Just look at The Hunger Games, The Maze Runner, The Uglies trilogy and more. The New York Times had a discussion where authors and other professionals chimed in on the popularity of the dystopian genre and tried to understand why young adults specifically are so drawn to it. What exactly is dystopian? Dystopia, according to Merriam Webster, means an imaginary place where people lead dehumanized and often fearful lives. It’s the anti-utopia, the anti amazing heavenly paradise. Stories in the dystopia genre are dark, conflict-driven and usually take place sometime in the future after something horrible has happened to the Earth whether through an apocalypse, government takeover, war, drought etc. Coming up with the back story in a dystopian novel is where a writer can be truly inventive in social commentary and criticism. My favorite contemporary dystopian novel is The Hunger Games series by Suzanne Collins, which I’m on book 2 of. Get writing!

7 novembre 2012 Creating a character profile When you get an idea for a short story or a novel you probably get the basic idea of the characters with it. But in order to build believable characters you need more than just a basic idea of them. You need to really them. The easiest way to flesh out a character is with a character profile, so get out a blank sheet of paper and follow the sample profile below. NAME: Put your characters full name - first, last, and any nicknames that he goes by. BIOGRAPHY: Write a description of your character's life; past and present. AGE: If you don't know the exact age of your character then you can put it's approximation, such as late thirties, mid-twenties etc. HEIGHT: How tall is your character? WEIGHT: You probably won't know your character's exact weight, but I'm sure you can guess its approximate one. BODY TYPE: Is he wiry and agile, or does he work out and his body is the proof? FACE TYPE: Is your character baby faced, or does he have a sharp, chiseled bone structure?

Creative Writing Prompts | Creative Writing Prompts for Sci-Fi &Fantasy Lovers | Writing Forward Posted by Melissa Donovan on April 5, 2013 · Fantastical creative writing prompts. In the world of creative writing, we’ve only begun tapping the possibilities in speculative fiction, a genre that includes science fiction, fantasy, paranormal, supernatural, horror, and superhero stories, as well as anything that ventures beyond known reality. Speculative fiction is an under-recognized genre: Academia and literary elitists traditionally haven’t given it much credence, although it has been gaining acclaim in recent years. But the genre’s fans are rabid. Plus, it’s a lot of fun to step outside of reality and see just what your imagination can do. You can write about knights and dragons, spaceships and far-off planets, the apocalypse, ghosts, or strange islands with magical properties. The creative writing prompts below can be used in any way you want. The Speculative Fiction Edition* A plane is flying from Australia to Los Angeles.

25 Things You Should Know About Character Previous iterations of the “25 Things” series: 25 Things Every Writer Should Know 25 Things You Should Know About Storytelling And now… Here you’ll find the many things I believe — at this moment! 1. Without character, you have nothing. 2. A great character can be the line between narrative life and story death. 3. Don’t believe that all those other aspects are separate from the character. 4. The audience will do anything to spend time with a great character. 5. It is critical to know what a character wants from the start. 6. It doesn’t matter if we “like” your character, or in the parlance of junior high whether we even “like-like” your character. 7. It is critical to smack the audience in the crotchal region with an undeniable reason to give a fuck. 8. You must prove this thesis: “This character is worth the audience’s time.” 9. Don’t let the character be a dingleberry stuck to the ass of a toad as he floats downriver on a bumpy log. 10. 11. 12. 13. The law of threes. 15. 16. 17. 18.

Story Starters for Creative Writing Exercises: One-Line Writing Prompts for Group or Individual Writing Practice | Suite101.com One-line story starters are great for group writing exercises. They have enough conflict to start the writing flow, but are open-ended to allow each writer to follow his or her own direction. Individual writers can use them on a regular basis for “practice writing,” following Natalie Goldberg’s suggestions in Writing Down the Bones. Creative Writing Exercises Set a timer for 10, 15 or 20 minutes. As writing exercises for individuals, try doing one each day, or several a week if daily is too much. Develop a Short Story or Novel? If the results of these writing exercises remain intriguing, spend more time with them, either that session or on different days. Story Starters Here are 25 simple story starters to get the creative juices flowing.

Get Your Mojo Workin’ with Creative Writing Prompts There is nothing worse than thinking your writing mojo is gone. If you need to reconnect to the passion of your writing and story, these prompts are designed to take you right back into your happy writing place. Start with these prompts for a quick-start, and the moment you feel your mojo come into your heart and through your fingers, go back to your writing and enjoy! (Keep and pull these out again in case of writing emergency.) Your Personal Book Journal Questions Remember why you wanted to write this particular book? Why are you writing this book? Ramp Up Your Story Need to inject some excitement into your story? What can you add to the mix to make this concept bigger? Write (First Person) in Your Protagonist’s Voice Ask for help from the most logical person…er…character! What do you think about what just happened? Write (First Person) in Your Antagonist’s Voice Don’t leave out the bad guy. Good luck, go forth, and reclaim your writing mojo!

Questionnaires for Writing Character Profiles - Creative Writing Help - StumbleUpon Enter your e-mail to get the e-book for FREE. We'll also keep you informed about interesting website news. "I have searched the web and used different worksheets, but none have come close to your worksheets and descriptions of (what to do and what not to do). Both courses I have taken have with Creative Writing Now have been amazing. "As usual - I already love the course on Irresistible Fiction, rewriting a lot and improving greatly even after the first lesson. “Essentials of Fiction proved that I could indeed write and I wrote every day, much to my boyfriend's dismay (waa sniff).” - Jill Gardner "I am loving the course and the peer interaction on the blog is fantastic!!!" "I'm enjoying the weekly email course, Essentials of Poetry Writing. "Thank you for all the material in this course. "I was pleasantly surprised at the quality of the lessons and feel they were very helpful in introducing new ideas and perspectives to my writing. "Thanks very much for this course. "Thank you so much!!

Creative Writing Journal Prompts 1. Imagine you had a hundred dollars, but you couldn't keep it. You had to give it away to a person or charity. Who would you give it to? What would you want them to do with it? 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. See also: Writing Prompts This page has printable writing prompt worksheets. Persuasive Writing Prompts Check out our collection of persuasive writing topics. Writing Story Pictures Write a creative stories to describe what's happening in these pictures.

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