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4 Principles For Creating Change, And 4 Barriers That Make It Harder

4 Principles For Creating Change, And 4 Barriers That Make It Harder
Many people now are struggling to make change; to drive social or environmental impact whether they are social entrepreneurs or people working from within organizations to make a difference. In this piece, we wanted to focus on thinking about how communities of change makers can thrive. It’s not enough for change making to be the sole remit of a handful of do-gooders or NGOs. By highlighting some of the barriers and core principles that are vital to the success of a world in which everyone is a change maker, we hope to begin to mainstream the art of change making and destroy the social entrepreneur’s monopoly on social change. Barrier 1: Experts As Idols Too often change making is outsourced to experts or social entrepreneurs rather than community members. Barrier 2: Conditions Of Problem Solving Are Overlooked Much of the time, we are quick to jump to tactical problem solving without fully reflecting on whether the conditions for it are put in place. Barrier 4: Learning Is One to One

http://www.fastcoexist.com/1679609/4-principles-for-creating-change-and-4-barriers-that-make-it-harder

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