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Video game

Video game
A video game is an electronic game that involves human interaction with a user interface to generate visual feedback on a video device. The word video in video game traditionally referred to a raster display device,[1] but it now implies any type of display device that can produce two- or three-dimensional images. The electronic systems used to play video games are known as platforms; examples of these are personal computers and video game consoles. These platforms range from large mainframe computers to small handheld devices. Specialized video games such as arcade games, while previously common, have gradually declined in use. Video games have gone on to become an art form and industry. Video games typically use additional means of providing interactivity and information to the player. History Early games used interactive electronic devices with various display formats. Other early examples include: Overview Platforms Genres Classifications Casual games Main article: Casual game Serious games

Related:  Half-Life nov 19 1998miscellaneous

Half-Life video game Valve, set up by former Microsoft employees, had difficulty finding a publisher for the game, with many believing that it was too ambitious a project. Sierra On-Line eventually signed the game after expressing interest in making a 3D action game. The game had its first major public appearance at the 1997 Electronic Entertainment Expo. Designed for Windows, the game's engine, GoldSrc, was a heavily modified version of id Software's Quake game engine with code portions from the id Tech 2 engine.[1][4]

Breathtaking Portraits Of Ballet Dancers Practicing On The Streets Of New York A few months ago we featured Omar Roble's amazing photographs of ballet dancers on the streets of Cuba. Well now he's back with another mesmerizing collection of famous dancers performing on the streets of New York City. The Puerto Rico born, NYC-based photographer, who has over 200k followers on Instagram, works with dancers from the American Ballet Theatre and The Dance Theatre of Harlem (and many more) to create his stunning street portraits of dancers in motion. Set against the urban backdrop of New York, the calming composure and elegance of his subjects creates a perfect contrast with the hustle and bustle of everyday life in the city that never sleeps. “Ballet dancers make us feel as if their movements were truly effortless," Robles writes on his blog. "This while pushing their bodies to the very extreme of what is humanly possible.

Theatre Theatre or theater[1] is a collaborative form of fine art that uses live performers to present the experience of a real or imagined event before a live audience in a specific place. The performers may communicate this experience to the audience through combinations of gesture, speech, song, music, and dance. Elements of design and stagecraft are used to enhance the physicality, presence and immediacy of the experience.[2] The specific place of the performance is also named by the word "theatre" as derived from the Ancient Greek θέατρον (théatron, "a place for viewing"), itself from θεάομαι (theáomai, "to see", "to watch", "to observe"). Modern Western theatre derives in large measure from ancient Greek drama, from which it borrows technical terminology, classification into genres, and many of its themes, stock characters, and plot elements. Theatre today, broadly defined, includes performances of plays and musicals, ballets, operas and various other forms.

Interactive storytelling Interactive Storytelling (IS) is a form of digital entertainment in which users create or influence a dramatic storyline through actions, either by issuing commands to the story's protagonist, or acting as a general director of events in the narrative. Interactive storytelling is a medium where the narrative, and its evolution, can be influenced in real-time by a user.[1] History[edit] Early attempts to understand interactive storytelling date back to the 1970s with such efforts as Roger Schank's research at Northwestern University and the experimental program TaleSpin.[4] In the early 1980s Michael Liebowitz developed "Universe", a conceptual system for a kind of interactive storytelling.

Combine (Half-Life) The Combine are frequently shown as harsh rulers over the citizens of Earth, suppressing dissent with brutality, policing using violence and using invasive surgery to transform humans into either soldiers or slaves. Throughout the games, the player primarily battles with transformed humans as well as synthetic and mechanical enemies that are the product of Combine technology. The atmosphere generated by the dystopian Combine state has been praised by reviewers, although the artificial intelligence of the transhuman Combine characters was thought to be inferior to that of other characters in Half-Life 2.

100 Awesome Photoshop Brushes Sets You Should Have The demand for high-quality brushes for Photoshop is growing day by day. Designers need brushes for various web projects and photography post-processing. There are so many Photoshop brushes all over the Internet that it’s extremely difficult to find the one that would completely fit your specialised requirements. That is why I decided to collect 100 fantastic and free Photoshop brush sets!

Dance Origins and history Many contemporary dance forms can be traced back to historical, traditional, ceremonial, and ethnic dance. For example, some Sri Lankan dances are related to aboriginal, mythical devils known as "yakkas", and according to local legend, Kandyan dance began as a ritual that broke the magic spell on a bewitched king. Ancient Greek bronze statuette of a dancer, 3rd - 2nd century BC, found in Alexandria, Egypt.Dancing maenad on a Paestan red-figure skyphos, ca. 330-320 BC.

Temporality In philosophy, temporality is traditionally the linear progression of past, present, and future. However, some modern-century philosophers have interpreted temporality in ways other than this linear manner. Examples would be McTaggart's The Unreality of Time, Husserl's analysis of internal time consciousness, Martin Heidegger's Being and Time (1927), George Herbert Mead's Philosophy of the Present (1932), and Jacques Derrida's criticisms of Husserl's analysis, as well as Nietzsche's eternal return of the same, though this latter pertains more to historicity, to which temporality gives rise. Simulation game A simulation game attempts to copy various activities from "real life" in the form of a game for various purposes such as training, analysis, or prediction. Usually there are no strictly defined goals in the game, with players instead allowed to freely control a character.[1] Well-known examples are war games, business games, and role play simulation. From three basic types of strategic, planning, and learning exercises: games, simulations, and case studies, a number of hybrids may be considered, including simulation games that are used as case studies.[2] Comparisons of the merits of simulation games versus other teaching techniques have been carried out by many researchers and a number of comprehensive reviews have been published.[3] History[edit]