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What Happens In An Internet Minute?

What Happens In An Internet Minute?
Related:  dig.citEducation Futures

Bing Launches Its Election Site, Lets You Filter News By Political Perspective Better late than never. With less than two weeks to go before the U.S. presidential election on November 6, Microsoft’s Bing just unveiled Bing Elections. The site features news results from major U.S. publications that can be filtered by political preference (right, left, center), as well as an interactive map with election results and sentiment analysis across key issues based on data from Twitter and Facebook. It’s surprising that Bing is only launching this site so late in the game, but the result is actually quite interesting. The most interesting and unique feature about the site is probably the news site that, as Microsoft puts it, “lets people filter the news the way they like it.” Here is the full run-down of all of Bing Elections’ features:

How to Spot the Future | Wired Business Photo: Brock Davis Thirty years ago, when John Naisbitt was writing Megatrends, his prescient vision of America’s future, he used a simple yet powerful tool to spot new ideas that were bubbling in the zeitgeist: the newspaper. He didn’t just read it, though. He took out a ruler and measured it. As clever as Naisbitt’s method was, it would never work today. This may sound like a paradox. So how do we spot the future—and how might you? It’s no secret that the best ideas—the ones with the most impact and longevity—are transferable; an innovation in one industry can be exported to transform another. This notion goes way back. Sometimes the cross-pollination is potent enough to create entirely new disciplines. More recently, the commonalities between biology and digital technology—code is code, after all—have inspired a new generation to reach across specialties and create a range of new cross-bred disciplines: bioinformatics, computational genomics, synthetic biology, systems biology.

Lesson | Guest Post | Who Are You Online? Considering Issues of Web Identity Wednesday (Feb. 6) is Digital Learning Day, an annual opportunity to contemplate the place of technology in the classroom and in our lives. Last year, we celebrated by digging through 40 years of New York Times reporting on technology in education to find gems like the 1982 article “Computers Alter Lives of Pupils and Teachers.” This year, we have a student essay challenge, and we have also invited a guest post from Common Sense Media, an organization “dedicated to improving the lives of children and families by providing the trustworthy information, education, and independent voice they need to thrive in a world of media and technology.” We collaborated with the Common Sense Media writer Kelly Schryver to focus on the increasingly important and nuanced question “Who Are You Online?” – Katherine Schulten and Shannon Doyne Who Are You Online? Are You the ‘Real You’ Online? What kinds of things do you tend to post online, and how much thought do you give to choosing or creating them?

Interview: Sherry Turkle, Author of 'Alone Together' As soon as Sherry Turkle arrived at the studio for her Fresh Air interview, she realized she'd forgotten her phone. "I realized I'd left it behind, and I felt a moment of Oh my god ... and I felt it kind of in the pit of my stomach," she tells Terry Gross. That feeling of emotional dependence on digital devices is the focus of Turkle's research. Her book, Alone Together, explores how new technology is changing the way we communicate with one another. "The pull of these devices is so strong, that we've become used to them faster than anyone would have suspected," says Turkle, a clinical psychologist and the founder of MIT's Initiative on Technology and Self. When Turkle asked teens and adults why they preferred text messaging over face-to-face conversation, they responded that when you're face to face, "you can't control what you are going to say, and you don't know how long it's going to take or where it could go." Interview Highlights On young children using digital devices

Elements April 18, 2014 The Antisocial-Media App A few weeks ago, I was in a café across the street from my house, having just put in an order for the first cappuccino of the day, when a woman walked in with her young son. I recognized him as one of the children who is regularly looked after by the same child minder as my own son. The woman, on the other hand, I had never seen before. The boy obviously recognized me, too, because as his mother was placing her coffee order he smiled up at me and said hello. April 17, 2014 Little Lies the Internet Told Me Everyone knows about the big Internet scams: the e-mails advertising diet pills, the proposed Nigerian bank transfers. Take search. The Happiness App On a sunny morning, Ofer Leidner, a co-creator of an app called Happify, sat in a meeting room at the Fueled Collective, in SoHo, where about half of Happify’s staff works in a corner of a large, open-plan space, among some twenty other startup teams. ...Continue Reading >> April 16, 2014 April 15, 2014

What's your digital footprint? Take this quiz and find out! I developed this quiz with members of my personal learning network (found at end of post) to get students thinking about their digital footprint. The quiz was created at the request of high school students I spoke with who thought the creation of a such a quiz could lead to a smart conversation about ways students can update their digital footprint so that it is one that leads to college and career success. Check it out with your students and let me know how it goes in the comments below. How’d you do?

Practically Applied: A Month of Creation in #digcit One of the struggles that I have had teaching computer classes and even adult professional development over the years is the artificial nature of the exercise. While there are a few notable exceptions and tried & true lessons, the teaching of computers is typically taught as a series of artificial "problems" and walk-through solutions. Students for the most part recognize this and go through the motions to a greater or lesser extent depending on how much they value their grades. Thus, when we decided to recast the curriculum for Computer Applications as a course in Digital Citizenship (#digccit) based heavily on the ISTE National Education Technology Standards for Students, one of our implicit goals was to make the student experience more real and more relevant. Context: Brebeuf Jesuit runs a modified-modular schedule. The course has built-in discussion time where students bring in articles on technology trends, news, or events that they have discovered and share with the class.

Coop Connections The 5 Things All Digital Citizens Should Do Being a digital citizen is a fact of life these days. Everyone must be a well-behaved digital citizen looking to help others. Think of it like the Girl / Boy Scouts but online. First off, let’s take a quick look at what the all-knowing all-powerful Wikipedia says about the topic: People characterizing themselves as digital citizens often use IT extensively, creating blogs, using social networks, and participating in web journalism sites. Personally, I don’t think the definition needs to be limited to people who ‘use IT extensively’ (whatever that means – are they swapping out servers and using desktops as stepping stools or something?) See Also: The Teacher’s Guide To Digital Citizenship These five are just the tip of the iceberg though.

Ed Tech Reflections The future of jobs in Canada - Business Fernando Morales/The Globe and Mail/CP On a recent February evening, Karl Eve received an emergency call from a restaurant owner in Canmore, Alta. The busy eatery had suddenly found itself with no hot water, even though the basement hot water tanks appeared to be working fine. It’s the sort of detective work Eve says he loves about his job. Eve’s story is more rare than it should be in Canada. At the same time, the nature of work itself is changing as the country transitions to a so-called knowledge economy that relies on a well-trained and highly educated workforce to produce value-added products and services. Economists call it a skills “mismatch.” Hence, Canada not only needs to encourage more people to enter the workforce, but to ensure everyone will be productive once they get there. Evidence of the shortage is already popping up in day-to-day life. But such cross-border shopping for talent threatens to become a problem in its own right. But immigration alone won’t be a panacea.

Turning Students into Good Digital Citizens 21st Century Literacy | In Print Turning Students into Good Digital Citizens Schools have always been charged with the task of producing good citizens. But how has our definition of a "good citizen" changed over the ages? By John K. In today's world of near-ubiquitous connectivity, in which ordinary people have almost instantaneous access to unlimited stores of information and the ability to interact with anyone, anywhere, anytime, what does it mean to be an effective citizen? Ask a K-12 educator these questions and chances are the answers will have something to do with teaching proper behavior and setting appropriate prohibitions. But some educators, particularly those who think about this issue in higher education, will say that digital citizenship has less to do with safety and civility than participation in the worldwide online conversation--participation that requires a set of relatively sophisticated skills.

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