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Ayah Bdeir: Building blocks that blink, beep and teach

Ayah Bdeir: Building blocks that blink, beep and teach
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The hidden beauty of pollination: Louie Schwartzberg on TED Live from TED2014 Mysteries of the unseen world: Louie Schwartzberg at TED2014 Louie Schwartzberg is fascinated with exposing the world’s wonders through photography. Signals: The speakers in session 9 of TED2014 Communication is fundamental to how we relate and interact. 20 Awesome Do It Yourself Projects Thursday, June 14, 2012 4:30 am, Posted by Chris Groves | Internet 20 Awesome Do It Yourself Projects Topics: At Home Project Ideas , Creative DIY Home Projects , Do It Yourself Projects for 2012 , Fun How To Projects , What to Do with Extra Stuff Are you bored and have a bunch of extra little items hanging around here and there? You honestly don’t know some of the creative things you can do with what could possible be junk. If you know of any great at home Do It Yourself Projects please leave a comment to include your own and maybe we will add it to our list. And for the upcoming holiday season we want to give all you do-it-yourselfers a head start with these incredible Christmas DIY for 2012 1. More info: here | Buy: here 2. More info: here 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. Incoming search terms:

A Playful 3-D Puzzle That Becomes A Working Radio Despite how often we use our electronic devices, most of us don’t have much of an idea of what goes on inside them. Soldering, circuitry, silicon--it all seems technical and intimidating, and until we’re in some sort of post-apocalyptic situation in which I need to fashion an emergency radio out of a coat hanger and some old cellphone parts, I’m pretty much okay with leaving the guts inside the gadgets. But as part of the designers in residence program at the London Design Museum, Japansese designer Yuri Suzuki, in conjunction with the electronics education group Technology Will Save Us, made those guts the star of the show. The Puzzle is a set of custom-designed printed circuit board pieces that can be arranged to create a few basic devices, namely a light and a radio. The challenge in designing the Denki Puzzle was coming up with pieces that were visually engaging while still functioning electrically. [Hat Tip designboom]

25 clever ideas to make life easier Via: amy-newnostalgia.blogspot.com Why didn’t I think of that?! We guarantee you’ll be uttering those words more than once at these ingenious little tips, tricks and ideas that solve everyday problems … some you never knew you had! (Above: hull strawberries easily using a straw). Via: apartmenttherapy.com Rubbing a walnut over scratches in your furniture will disguise dings and scrapes. Via: unplggd.com Remove crayon masterpieces from your TV or computer screen with WD40 (also works on walls). Via: athomewithrealfood.blogspot.com Stop cut apples browning in your child’s lunch box by securing with a rubber band. Via: marthastewart.com Overhaul your linen cupboard – store bedlinen sets inside one of their own pillowcases and there will be no more hunting through piles for a match. Via: realsimple.com Pump up the volume by placing your iPhone / iPod in a bowl – the concave shape amplifies the music. Via: savvyhousekeeping.com Re-use a wet-wipes container to store plastic bags. Via: iheartnaptime.net

5 Lessons In UI Design, From A Breakthrough Museum Museums today compete for attention in a wildly difficult environment: If you’re a youngster, why stare at a Greek urn when you could blow one up in a video game? One institution thinking deeply about the challenge is the Cleveland Museum of Art, which this month unveiled a series of revamped galleries, designed by Local Projects, which feature cutting-edge interactivity. But the technology isn’t the point. "We didn’t want to create a tech ghetto," says David Franklin, the museum’s director. Adds Local Projects founder Jake Barton, "We wanted to make the tech predicated on the art itself." Put another way, the new galleries at CMA tackle the problem plaguing most ambitious UI projects today: How do you let the content shine, and get the tech out of the way? 1. The first gallery that many new visitors will see, Gallery One, is a signature space, meant to draw in a younger crowd. In one display, a computer analyzes the expression on a visitor’s face. 2. 3. 4. 5.

TetraBox Light by Ed Chew Liquid to Light Designer Ed Chew takes a green step in the right direction with the TetraBox lamp, a light object made from discarded drink packets that would have otherwise ended up in landfills already packed to the brim. The design is achieved by unfolding the packets and refolding them into hexagonal and pentagonal sections that are then pieced together to form a geodesic sphere or any other desired shape. Here, the Epcot-like ball makes an attractive overhead light and casts an impressive web of shadows and shapes on the surrounding space. Designer: Ed Chew 10x10 - Educate Girls. Change the World.

Mountains of Books Become Mountains I thought I’d seen every type of book carving imaginable, until I ran across these jaw dropping creations by Guy Laramee. His works are so sculptural, so movingly natural in their form, they’ve really touched me. His works are inspired by a fascination with so-called progress in society: a thinking which says the book is dead, libraries are obsolete and technology is the only way of the future. His thoughts: “One might say: so what? Do we really believe that “new technologies” will change anything concerning our existential dilemma, our human condition? See Also INCREDIBLE 3D ILLUSTRATIONS JUMP OUT OF THE SKETCHBOOK Carving into the discarded stacks of books, he has created fantastic, romantic landscapes which remind us that though our fascinations and the value we put on different ideas have changed, we as a species have not evolved that much. “Mountains of disused knowledge return to what they really are: mountains. See more of his beautifully meditative works at guylaramee.com.

heppell.net • learning • ingenuity • research • policy • design • technology • delight • (+ sailing!) DIY Friendship Necklace As soon as Lauren and I saw this editorial in Flare Magazine, we knew we had to recreate these awesome, friendship bracelet-like necklaces. We promise they are super easy to make and the perfect way to pass the time during those long summer roadtrips. To make a 2-tone necklace, cut a long piece of rope and wrap two different colors of embroidery thread around its own bobbin. Tie a starter knot along with the two colored threads you are using, leaving at least 3 inches of slack, Tape down the slack to a flat surface or safety pin it something that will help keep it in place (feeling nostalgic yet?). To alternate colors, simply put the inactive color (red) in your left hand and the new active color (purple) in your right. Once you’re done knotting, add a few nuts and/or washers to the necklace.

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