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VisualDNA - Discover - Home

VisualDNA - Discover - Home
VisualDNA brings a new layer of information to the world of technology that will help bring it closer to the people who use it – making it more enjoyable and relevant. Technology provides businesses with a surfeit of DATA – what and when. However it provides very little in the way of UNDERSTANDING – who did things, and why they did them. We see this effect in all areas of business from marketing to financial services. Despite all the targeting and site metrics, digital marketing isn’t getting any more effective. And despite all the data gathering there’s a limit to what credit histories can tell financial services about customers and potential customers.

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The Sequence of Archetypes in Individuation DynaPsych Table of Contents James Whitlark Professor of English Texas Tech University Scattered throughout Jung’s writings are a few references to the sequence of archetypes associated with stages of individuation. 10 Tips on How to Feel Beautiful Every Day This morning, I got a request for this post. I haven’t written much about the topic of beauty before, but I felt really compelled to write this post immediately. Beauty it is such a complicated concept because we all have such different views on what beauty feels and looks like. My idea of beauty might be completely different from yours. So, when I talk about beauty, I’m not just talking about fashion, makeup and style – I’m also talking beauty from within.

Myers-Briggs Type Indicator A chart with descriptions of each Myers–Briggs personality type and the four dichotomies central to the theory The Myers–Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) is an introspective self-report questionnaire designed to indicate psychological preferences in how people perceive the world around them and make decisions.[1][2][3] The MBTI was constructed by Katharine Cook Briggs and her daughter Isabel Briggs Myers. 16 Personality Factors The Sixteen Personality Factor Questionnaire (or 16PF),[1] is a multiple-choice personality questionnaire which was developed over several decades of research by Raymond B. Cattell, Maurice Tatsuoka and Herbert Eber. Beginning in the 1940s, Cattell used the new techniques of factor analysis (based on the correlation coefficient) in an attempt to try to discover and measure the source traits of human personality (Cattell, 1946)(Nevid, 2009).[2][3] The questionnaire measures the 16 primary traits, and the Big Five secondary traits,[4][5] which have become popularized by other authors in recent years.

3 New Tools for Promoting Your Interests. The Spark of Genius Series highlights a unique feature of startups and is made possible by Microsoft BizSpark. If you would like to have your startup considered for inclusion, please see the details here. Each weekend, Mashable selects startups we think are building interesting, unique or niche products. This week we focused on three companies creating new ways to promote your interests. 38 Vintage Conversation Rules Editor’s note: The excerpt below comes from a book published in 1875: A Gentleman’s Guide to Etiquette by Cecil B. Hartley. Hartley’s rules may be over 100 years old, but they’re just as true today as they ever were. Category:Personality typologies The concept of personality type refers to the psychological classification of different types of people. Personality types can be distinguished from personality traits, which come in different levels or degrees. According to type theories, for example, there are two fundamental types of people, introverts and extraverts. According to trait theories, introversion and extraversion are part of a continuous dimension, with many people in the middle.

Character Strengths and Virtues The strengths and virtues[edit] CSV defined character strengths as satisfying most of the ten following criteria. Character strengths are The introduction of CSV suggests that these six virtues are considered good by the vast majority of cultures and throughout history and that these traits lead to increased happiness when practiced. Notwithstanding numerous cautions and caveats, this suggestion of universality hints that in addition to trying to broaden the scope of psychological research to include mental wellness, the leaders of the positive psychology movement are challenging moral relativism and suggesting that virtue has a biological basis.[1] These arguments are in line with the Science of morality. The authors draw from the writings of various thinkers.

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