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Nondualism

Nondualism
Nondualism, also called non-duality, "points to the idea that the universe and all its multiplicity are ultimately expressions or appearances of one essential reality." It is a term and concept used to define various strands of religious and spiritual thought. Its origins are situated within the Buddhist tradition with its teaching of the two truths doctrine, the nonduality of the absolute and the relative, and the Yogacara notion of "pure consciousness" or "representation-only" (vijñapti-mātra). The term has more commonly become associated with the Advaita Vedanta tradition of Adi Shankara, which took over the Buddhis notion of pure consciousness and provided an orthodox hermeneutical basis for heterodox Buddhist phenomology. Advaita Vedanta states that there is no difference between Brahman and Ātman, a stance which is also reflected in other Indian traditions, such as Shiva Advaita and Kashmir Shaivism. Definitions[edit] Dictionary definitions of "nondualism" are scarce. Tantra[edit] 1.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nondualism

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Ego Death: The Obliteration of the Self and the Experience of Enlightenment ⋆ LonerWolf Waking up is an endless losing what you think you know, like a wave of destruction that leaves nothing, but what is true. —Unmani Death is a word that we humans usually associate with darkness, mourning, decay and general creepiness. We spend our entire lives running away from, avoiding and denying the fact that we will someday physically die. However, the death that I’ll be talking about in this article isn’t the typical kind of death we fear. The death I’ll be referring to is the most beautiful, precious, illuminating, awe-inspiring, expansive, enlightening and paradigm-shattering experience you could ever go through.

Mental plane Predecessors of the concept[edit] In India in the seventh century b.c.e., the Taittiriya Upanishad referred to five levels of self, of which the middle one is the "self made of mind" (manas) Although the text is describing the nature of the individual rather than the cosmos as a whole, it established the concept of mind as only one of a series of ontological layers of being. The Taittiriyan concept of the five selves would represent an important element of Vedantic ontology, for example the five koshas of Advaita Vedanta. Carl Jung’s Psychological Diagnosis Using Mandalas Mandalas have been used in many ancient cultures like Buddhism, Hinduism, Native American, Australian Aboriginal as a symbol of the universe and wholeness. Literally speaking, mandala is a geometrical form – a square or a circle – abstract and static, or a vivid image formed of objects and/or beings. It’s a cosmic diagram that reminds us of our connection with the infinite. Interestingly, Carl Jung, the Swiss psychiatrist, explored the psychological effects of mandalas, while studying Eastern religion. He is credited with introducing the Eastern concept of the mandala to Western thought and believed its symbolic of the inner process by which individuals grow toward fulfilling their potential for wholeness.

Adapting Dishonesty: Here's What Happens in Your Brain When You Lie Oct 25, 2016 04:59 AM EDT A new study revealed that consistent small lies could alter the way on how a certain part of the brain associated to negative emotions respond to lie, desensitizing our brain in the process and encourages bigger lies in the future. The study, published in the journal Nature Neuroscience, is the first to provide empirical evidence that telling small lies could gradually lead to larger lies. Additionally, the study is also the first to have a deeper look on the brain's responses to repeated and increasing acts of dishonesty. "When we lie for personal gain, our amygdala produces a negative feeling that limits the extent to which we are prepared to lie," explained senior author Dr Tali Sharot, from University College London Experimental Psychology, in a statement. "However, this response fades as we continue to lie, and the more it falls the bigger our lies become.

Spiritual practice A spiritual practice or spiritual discipline (often including spiritual exercises ) is the regular or full-time performance of actions and activities undertaken for the purpose of cultivating spiritual development . A common metaphor used in the spiritual traditions of the world's great religions is that of walking a path. [ 1 ] Therefore a spiritual practice moves a person along a path towards a goal. The goal is variously referred to as salvation , liberation or union (with God). Science Is Proving Some Memories Are Passed Down From Our Ancestors Do you have a fear of spiders? Maybe snakes? It could be your ancestors trying to tell you something. Recent studies have provided evidence that memories of fear are one of many things our forebearers pass down to us through our DNA. A 2013 study from Emory University found that mice trained to fear a specific odor would pass their emotions on to their offspring and future generations. Scientists applied electric shocks to mice as they exposed them to the smell of cherry blossoms.

Awakened Soul: The Last Reincarnation ⋆ LonerWolf There’s a worm addicted to eating grape leaves.Suddenly he wakes up, call it grace, whatever, something wakes him, and he’s no longer a worm.He’s the entire vineyard, and the orchard too, the fruit, the trunks, a growing wisdom and joy that doesn’t need to devour.~ Rumi, “The Worm’s Waking” For the past few years we’ve been writing about Old Souls and Soul Ages as a way to explain the process of existential recurrence – our individual lives rippling through eternity. Once we’ve accepted the nature of our soul’s existence, there are a few important questions that are raised. What is the purpose of reincarnation? What are our Soul’s evolving towards? And as we mature in soul age, why do we feel a growing urge to “return back home”?

Spiritualism (beliefs) It is also a term commonly used for various psychic or paranormal practices and beliefs recorded throughout humanity's history[2][3] and in a variety of cultures.[4][5] Spiritualistic traditions appear deeply rooted in shamanism and perhaps are one of the oldest forms of religion. Mediumship is a modern form of shamanism and such ideas are very much like those developed by Edward Burnett Tylor in his theory of animism,[6] in which there are other parallel worlds to our own, though invisible to us and not accessible to us in our state. A psychic is to be one of the connecting link between these worlds. A psychic is defined as someone endowed with exceptional sensitivity to the occult dimension, who experiences visions and revelations.

Major Arcana Dummett writes that originally the Major Arcana had simple allegorical or exoteric meaning, mostly originating in elite ideology in the Italian courts of the 15th century when it was invented.[3] The occult significance only began to emerge in the 18th century when Antoine Court de Gébelin (a Swiss clergyman and Freemason) published Le Monde Primitif. List of the Major Arcana[edit] Each Major Arcanum depicts a scene, mostly featuring a person or several people, with many symbolic elements. Higher Self: How to Experience Your Divine Essence, "Buddha Nature" or Soul ⋆ LonerWolf Every man is a divinity in disguise, a god playing the fool.― Ralph Waldo Emerson Through the ages the Higher Self has been given many names: the inner self, soul, Christ-consciousness, Buddha-nature, Spirit and authentic self. Most of all, our Higher Selves have been thought of as the deepest, most divine essence within us.

Abraxas Abraxas (Gk. ΑΒΡΑΣΑΞ, which is far more common in the sources than the variant form Abraxas, ΑΒΡΑΞΑΣ)[citation needed] was a word of mystic meaning in the system of the Gnostic Basilides, being there applied to the “Great Archon” (Gk., megas archōn), the princeps of the 365 spheres (Gk., ouranoi).[1] The seven letters spelling its name may represent each of the seven classic planets—Sun, Moon, Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn.[2] There are similarities and differences between such figures in reports about Basilides's teaching, ancient Gnostic texts, the larger Greco-Roman magical traditions, and modern magical and esoteric writings. Opinions abound on Abraxas, who in recent centuries has been claimed to be both an Egyptian god and a demon.[3] The Swiss Psychologist Carl Jung wrote a short Gnostic treatise in 1916 called The Seven Sermons to the Dead, which called Abraxas a god higher than the Christian God and devil that combines all opposites into one being.

Tarot Visconti-Sforza tarot deck. The Devil card is a 20th-century replacement for the card missing from the original 15th-century deck. François Rabelais gives tarau as the name of one of the games played by Gargantua in his Gargantua and Pantagruel;[2] this is likely the earliest attestation of the French form of the name.[citation needed] Tarot cards are used throughout much of Europe to play card games.

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