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Four Temperaments

Four Temperaments
Choleric, melancholic, sanguine, and phlegmatic temperaments Four temperaments is a proto-psychological theory that suggests that there are four fundamental personality types, sanguine (pleasure-seeking and sociable), choleric (ambitious and leader-like), melancholic (analytical and quiet), and phlegmatic (relaxed and peaceful). Most formulations include the possibility of mixtures of the types. The Greek physician Hippocrates (460–370 BC) incorporated the four temperaments into his medical theories as part of the ancient medical concept of humorism, that four bodily fluids affect human personality traits and behaviors. Later discoveries in biochemistry have led modern medicine science to reject the theory of the four temperaments, although some personality type systems of varying scientific acceptance continue to use four or more categories of a similar nature. History and development[edit] Choleric, sanguine, melancholic, and phlegmatic temperaments The four temperament types[edit]

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Personality psychology A picture of the depictions of personality dimensions. Personality psychology is a branch of psychology that studies personality and its variation among individuals. Its areas of focus include: construction of a coherent picture of the individual and their major psychological processesinvestigation of individual psychological differencesinvestigation of human nature and psychological similarities between individuals "Personality" is a dynamic[clarification needed] and organized set of characteristics possessed by a person that uniquely[clarification needed] influences their environment, cognitions, emotions, motivations, and behaviors in various situations.

Revolutions of 1848 The Revolutions of 1848, known in some countries as the Spring of Nations, Springtime of the Peoples[3] or the Year of Revolution, were a series of political upheavals throughout Europe in 1848. It remains the most widespread revolutionary wave in European history, but reactionary forces had regained control, and the revolutions collapsed typically within a year. The revolutions were essentially bourgeois-democratic in nature with the aim of removing the old feudal structures and the creation of independent national states. The revolutionary wave began in France in February, and immediately spread to most of Europe and parts of Latin America. Over 50 countries were affected, but with no coordination or cooperation among the revolutionaries in different countries. The uprisings were led by shaky ad hoc coalitions of reformers, the middle classes and workers, which did not hold together for long.

Prince Charming Prince Charming meets Cinderella in a 1912 book of fairy tales. In many variants, they can be viewed more as rewards for the heroine rather than characters.[1] "Prince Charming" is also used as a term to refer to the idealized man some people dream of as a future spouse.[2] Neuroticism Emotional stability[edit] At the opposite end of the spectrum, individuals who score low in neuroticism are more emotionally stable and less reactive to stress. They tend to be calm, even-tempered, and less likely to feel tense or rattled. Although they are low in negative emotion, they are not necessarily high on positive emotion. French Revolution of 1848 Louis-Philippe I, the last King of the French Louis Blanc, one of the two workers' representatives in the Assembly of the Second Republic The 1848 Revolution in France, sometimes known as the February Revolution (révolution de Février), was one of a wave of revolutions in 1848 in Europe. In France the revolutionary events ended the Orleans monarchy (1830–48) and led to the creation of the French Second Republic. Following the overthrow of King Louis Philippe in February, the elected government of the Second Republic ruled France.

Dark romanticism Edgar Allan Poe is among the most well-known authors of Dark Romanticism Dark romanticism (often conflated with Gothicism) is a literary subgenre of Romanticism. From its very inception in the late eighteenth century, Romanticism's celebration of euphoria and sublimity had been dogged by an equally intense fascination with melancholia, insanity, crime, the grotesque and the irrational. The name “Dark Romanticism” was given to this form by the literary theorist Mario Praz in his lengthy study of the genre published in 1930, ‘’The Romantic Agony’’.[1][2] According to the critic G. Conscientiousness Personality models[edit] Origin[edit] Terms such as 'hard-working,' 'reliable,' and 'persevering' describe desirable aspects of character. Because it was once believed to be a moral evaluation, conscientiousness was overlooked as a real psychological attribute.

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Time Cube Time Cube is a website created by Gene Ray, also known as Otis E. Ray, in 1997 [ 2 ] where he sets out his personal model of reality, which he calls Time Cube. [ 3 ] He suggests that all of modern physics is wrong, that religion (specifically Christianity) is evil, and that the idea of family is poisoning children. [ 3 ] The model proposes that each day is really four separate days occurring simultaneously. [ 2 ] [ 4 ] John C. Dvorak wrote in PC Magazine that "Metasites that track crackpot sites often say this is the number one nutty site." [ 3 ] Concept [ edit ] The website is mostly text written in centered, multi-colored 30-point type in a single vertical column. [ 3 ] The following quotation from the TimeCube.com website illustrates a recurring theme from Gene Ray's ideas: When the Sun shines upon Earth, 2 – major Time points are created on opposite sides of Earth – known as Midday and Midnight.

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The Great Terror The Great Terror: A Reassessment by Robert Conquest The Great Terror: Stalin's Purge of the Thirties is a book by British historian Robert Conquest, published in 1968. It gave rise to an alternate title of the period in Soviet history known as the Great Purge. A revised version of the book, called The Great Terror: A Reassessment, was printed in 1990 after Conquest was able to amend the text, having consulted recently opened Soviet archives. One of the first books by a Western writer to discuss the Great Purge in the Soviet Union, it was based mainly on information which had been made public, either officially or by individuals, during the Khrushchev Thaw in the period 1956–1964.

Guts Printed in Playboy magazine March 2004 Inhale. Take in as much air as you can. This story should last about as long as you can hold your breath, and then just a little bit longer.

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