background preloader

The Respiratory System

The Respiratory System

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hc1YtXc_84A

Related:  respiratory systemMS Science MTLE studieseducation

Human Respiratory System and Lungs; How They Work You usually don't even notice it, but twelve to twenty times per minute, day after day, you breathe -- thanks to your body's respiratory system. Your lungs expand and contract, supplying life-sustaining oxygen to your body and removing from it, a waste product called carbon dioxide. The Act of Breathing Breathing starts at the nose and mouth. Acid vs Base Bases are the chemical opposite of acids. Acids are defined as compounds that donate a hydrogen ion (H+) to another compound (called a base). Traditionally, an acid (from the Latin acidus or acere meaning sour) was any chemical compound that, when dissolved in water, gives a solution with a hydrogen ion activity greater than in pure water, i.e. a pH less than 7.0. Correspondingly, a base was any compound that, when dissolved in water, gives a solution with a hydrogen ion activity lower than that of pure water, i.e. a pH higher than 7.0 at standard conditions. A soluble base is also called an alkali.

What is the function of the respiratory system? The respiratory system is the group of tissues and organs in your body that enable you to breathe. This system includes your airways, your lungs and the blood vessels and muscles attached to them that work together so you can breathe. The respiratory system's primary function is to supply oxygen to all the parts of your body. It accomplishes this through breathing: inhaling oxygen-rich air and exhaling air filled with carbon dioxide, which is a waste gas. The respiratory system is made up of airways (your nose, mouth, voice box, windpipe and bronchial tubes) and the lungs and the muscles and blood vessels connected to them. Endocrine System Listen Things That Can Go Wrong Too much or too little of any hormone can be harmful to your body. For example, if the pituitary gland produces too much growth hormone, a teen may grow excessively tall. If it produces too little, a teen may be unusually short.

Your Lungs & Respiratory System Listen Time for Talk Your lungs are important for breathing . . . and also for talking! Above the trachea (windpipe) is the larynx (say: LAIR-inks), which is sometimes called the voice box. Across the voice box are two tiny ridges called vocal cords, which open and close to make sounds. When you exhale air from the lungs, it comes through the trachea and larynx and reaches the vocal cords. How To Memorize Things Quickly & Effectively What separates you from someone that can memorize π (pi) to the 100th decimal? It’s not natural ability; it’s technique and practice. In this tutorial, I will teach you how to master memorization and change your life. Table Of Contents Chunking | Break the information up into smaller chunks and re-categorize it.Spaced Repetition | Exploit the spacing effect by using an SRS flashcard application.Understand Memory | Learn the 11 properties that determine the difficulty of a given piece of information.Preparation | Avoid music with lyrics.

Interactive Anatomy Guide [Continued from above] . . . act as the functional units of the respiratory system by passing oxygen into the body and carbon dioxide out of the body. Finally, the muscles of respiration, including the diaphragm and intercostal muscles, work together to act as a pump, pushing air into and out of the lungs during breathing. Nose and Nasal CavityThe nose and nasal cavity form the main external opening for the respiratory system and are the first section of the body’s airway—the respiratory tract through which air moves. The nose is a structure of the face made of cartilage, bone, muscle, and skin that supports and protects the anterior portion of the nasal cavity.

Respiratory system In fish and many invertebrates, respiration takes place through the gills. Other animals, such as insects, have respiratory systems with very simple anatomical features, and in amphibians even the skin plays a vital role in gas exchange. Plants also have respiratory systems but the directionality of gas exchange can be opposite to that in animals. The respiratory system in plants also includes anatomical features such as holes on the undersides of leaves known as stomata.[2] Comparative anatomy and physiology Horses

Related: