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Accents and Dialects

Accents and Dialects
Public Domain / CIA NOTE: This guide uses the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA). For information about this notation, please visit my page of International Phonetic Alphabet Resources. There are obviously many North American accents. For reference, here is a list of only the most common classifications in the United States and Canada. General American This refers to the spectrum of ‘standard’ English spoken by newscasters, TV actors, and a large percentage of middle-class Americans. Prominent Features: The short-a (as in cat) is raised and diphthongized before nasal consonants. Accent Samples: Eastern New England English This describes the classic “Boston Accent.” New York City English One of the more famous American accents, the classic “New Yorkese” has been immortalized by films (“Goodfellas,” “Marty,” and “Manhattan,” among countless others), TV shows (“All in the Family,” “Seinfeld,” “King of Queens”) and plays (“A View from the Bridge,” “Lost in Yonkers,” “Guys and Dolls”). Conclusion

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Related:  LanguageVoiceEnglish / American Pronunciation

The World's Most Spoken Languages And Where They Are Spoken This beautifully illustrated infographic (above), designed by South China Morning Post’s graphics director Alberto Lucas Lopéz, shows the most spoken known languages in the world and where they’re spoken by the 6.3 billion people included in the study. Based on records collated from the database Ethnologue, the infographic illustrates the wide-ranging facts and figures of the world’s living languages catalogued since 1951. “There are at least 7,102 known languages alive in the world today. Twenty-three of these languages are a mother tongue for more than 50 million people.

Speech Patterns NEW YORK — Psychopaths are known to be wily and manipulative, but even so, they unconsciously betray themselves, according to scientists who have looked for patterns in convicted murderers' speech as they described their crimes. The researchers interviewed 52 convicted murderers, 14 of them ranked as psychopaths according to the Psychopathy Checklist-Revised, a 20-item assessment, and asked them to describe their crimes in detail. Using computer programs to analyze what the men said, the researchers found that those with psychopathic scores showed a lack of emotion, spoke in terms of cause-and-effect when describing their crimes, and focused their attention on basic needs, such as food, drink and money. [10 Contested Death Penalty Cases]

Pronunciation: 3 Principles On How To Make Your Spoken English Sound More Natural – A Guest Post I recently had the privilege and honour of being interviewed by my fellow English Language trainer, Elena Mutonono on her recent webinar “Accent Training for Business People“. For those of you who didn’t sign up for the webinar, here’s the recording. In that webinar we discussed the benefits of accent training for non-native business people and how accent training improves communication. I asked Elena, a pronunciation expert, to write a guest post for me to share her three tips on how you can make your spoken English sound more natural. I am delighted to pass the baton over to Elena for this week’s post. Elena Mutonono

The case of the missing “u”s in American English Before you consciously became aware of your decision to read this article, your brain was already making the necessary preparations to click the link. There are a few crucial milliseconds between the moment when you’re consciously aware of a plan to act, and the moment you take action. This brief window is thought by some scientists to be the moment in time when we can exercise free will. It gives us the chance to consciously make a decision, suggesting we aren’t just slaves to our impulses.

Bad News in Writing While you can't turn bad news into good through clever wording, the way that you deliver bad news in writing can affect how it is received the same way that it does when speaking. Some speakers know how to deliver bad news, and others only make it worse. The same is true in writing. The introduction is very important. It sets the context for the bad news, and context has a lot to do with how bad news is received. Instead of jumping straight into the bad, try leading with something positive.

The Primary Differences Among Major International English Dialects The British Empire hasn’t been in existence for almost three-quarters of a century. At the peak of its might, it covered close to a quarter of the world’s land area and ruled a fifth of its population. But the empire changed, transformed, and passed as all things pass. The secret language of South Asia’s transgender community — Quartz In South Asia, there is a hidden language known only to the region’s hijra community. Found in Pakistan, India, and Bangladesh, the hijra are an old and marginalized group, whose members identify as men born with the souls of women. Hijras call themselves she-males and effigies, as well as kwaja sera, or the “guards of the harem,” a title that recalls their historical role serving monarchs in the region.

Words and Phrases Coined by Shakespeare Words and Phrases Coined by Shakespeare NOTE: This list (including some of the errors I originally made) is found in several other places online. That's fine, but I've asked that folks who want this on their own sites mention that I am the original compiler. For many English-speakers, the following phrases are familiar enough to be considered common expressions, proverbs, and/or clichés. All of them originated with or were popularized by Shakespeare.

PlayPhrase.me: Endless stream of movie clips of specific phrases () Our service will teach you to understand spoken English. The purpose of PlayPhrase.me service is to learn english using TV series. We create video sequence from scenes that contain the word you search for. As soon as you submit your search query, the phrase list is returned and phrase list are played automatically. When we write correctly, we don't recall all the grammer and spelling rules, we just feel what's right. A 3D Map Of The Brain Shows How We Understand Language <img src="<a pearltreesdevid="PTD2167" rel="nofollow" href=" class="vglnk"><span pearltreesdevid="PTD2168">http</span><span pearltreesdevid="PTD2170">://</span><span pearltreesdevid="PTD2172">pixel</span><span pearltreesdevid="PTD2174">.</span><span pearltreesdevid="PTD2176">quantserve</span><span pearltreesdevid="PTD2178">.</span><span pearltreesdevid="PTD2180">com</span><span pearltreesdevid="PTD2182">/</span><span pearltreesdevid="PTD2184">pixel</span><span pearltreesdevid="PTD2186">/</span><span pearltreesdevid="PTD2188">p</span><span pearltreesdevid="PTD2190">-</span><span pearltreesdevid="PTD2192">cafODhhaQOlCs</span><span pearltreesdevid="PTD2194">.</span><span pearltreesdevid="PTD2196">gif</span></a>" style="display:none" height="1" width="1" alt="Quantcast" /> None

Flirting and Writing Dialogue I love exposition: flowing sentences, tight action, enveloping description. Prose is great. But for the past couple of weeks, I’ve been wondering what makes dialogue tick. Well-written dialogue is not conversation. Have you ever listened to the way people speak?

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