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Teaching with Primary Sources Program- Teaching with Primary Sources

Teaching with Primary Sources Program- Teaching with Primary Sources
About the Program The Teaching with Primary Sources Program works with colleges and other educational organizations to deliver professional development programs that help teachers use the Library of Congress's rich reservoir of digitized primary source materials to design challenging, high-quality instruction. Read more about the TPS Program TPS Regional Program The Library of Congress awards grants under the Teaching with Primary Sources (TPS) Regional program to school districts, universities, cultural institutions, library systems and other educational organizations who wish to incorporate TPS materials and methods into their existing education and professional development programs for pre and in-service teachers, librarians, media specialists and other K-12 educators. Read more about the TPS Regional Program The TPS Journal This Issue's Theme: Integrating Historical and Geographic Thinking Primary sources support the study of many disciplines, including both history and geography. Related:  Tools of the Historianjillerickson

Best Sites for Primary Documents in US History Common Core offers an incentive for teachers to use historic documents to build literacy skills in a content area while empowering students to be the historian in the classroom. But document-based (DBQ) instruction in this context requires four key elements to be successful: The right documents. Knowing how to look at them. Letting students discover their own patterns, then asking students to describe, compare and defend what they found. Basing the task on enduring questions, the kind that students might actually want to answer. I've assigned my pre-service social studies methods class the task of designing some DBQs and I assembled a list of some of my favorite sources for finding historic documents in American History. A Democracy of Images: Photographs from the Smithsonian American Art Museum. Woman and Child ca. 1850, daguerreotype with applied color Jeremiah Gurney Fighting American Creator U.S. Dial Comes to Town Bell Telephone

World Digital Library Home No other symphonic composition has met with such a broad and complex reception as Ludwig van Beethoven's Symphony Number 9 in D minor, opus 125, popularly known as the Choral Symphony. The work marked an important development in 19th century music. In the finale, Beethoven set to music the German poet Friedrich von Schiller’s An die Freude (Ode to joy), the first time the human voice was included in a symphonic work. The symphony was first performed in Vienna on May 7, 1824. Its influence ever since has extended far beyond the field of music.

Best Sites for Primary Documents in World History Common Core offers an incentive for teachers to use historic documents to build literacy skills in a content area while empowering students to be the historian in the classroom. But document-based (DBQ) instruction in this context requires four key elements to be successful: The right documents. Knowing how to look at them. Letting students discover their own patterns, then asking students to describe, compare and defend what they found. Basing the task on enduring questions, the kind that students might actually want to answer. I've assigned my pre-service social studies methods class the task of designing some DBQs and I assembled a list of some of my favorite sources for finding historic documents in World History. All these sites feature good search engines and the ability to download documents for use in classroom projects. Musicians and an acrobat, Smithfield Decretals (Brit. Title: Weighing Cotton, Bombay Creator: Johnson, William; Henderson, William Date: ca. 1855-1862

Document Analysis Worksheets Document analysis is the first step in working with primary sources. Teach your students to think through primary source documents for contextual understanding and to extract information to make informed judgments. Use these worksheets — for photos, written documents, artifacts, posters, maps, cartoons, videos, and sound recordings — to teach your students the process of document analysis. Follow this progression: The first few times you ask students to work with primary sources, and whenever you have not worked with primary sources recently, model careful document analysis using the worksheets. Don’t stop with document analysis though. Materials created by the National Archives and Records Administration are in the public domain. These worksheets were revised in February, 2017.

Historical Voices After 8 centuries, rats exonerated in spread of Black Death. Gerbils implicated. A gerbil (Rodrique Ngowi/AP) After nearly eight centuries of accusations for spreading the bubonic plague, scientists say they have compelling evidence to exonerate the much-maligned black rat. In the process, they’ve identified a new culprit: gerbils. It’s always the cute ones you have to watch out for, isn’t it? According to a study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, climate data dating back to the 14th century contradicts the commonly held notion that European plague outbreaks were caused by a reservoir of disease-carrying fleas hosted by the continent’s rat population. “For this, you would need warm summers, with not too much precipitation,” Nils Christian Stenseth, an author of the study, told the BBC. “… And we have looked at the broad spectrum of climatic indices, and there is no relationship between the appearance of plague and the weather.” Instead, the fearsome “Black Death,” as the epidemic was known, seemed curiously tied to the climate in Asia.

Teaching Adolescents How to Evaluate the Quality of Online Information An essential part of online research is the ability to critically evaluate information. This includes the ability to assess its level of accuracy, reliability, and bias. In 2012, my colleagues and I assessed 770 seventh graders in two states to study these areas, and the results definitely got our attention. Unfortunately, over 70 percent of the students’ responses suggested that: Middle school students are more concerned with content relevance than with credibility They rarely attend to source features such as author, venue, or publication type to evaluate reliability and author perspective When they do refer to source features in their explanations, their judgments are often vague, superficial, and lacking in reasoned justification Other studies highlight similar shortcomings of high school and college students in these areas (see, for example, a 2016 study from Stanford). So what can you do to more explicitly teach adolescents how to evaluate the quality of online information?

Trading Card Creator The Trading Card tool gives students an alternative way to demonstrate their literacy knowledge and skill when writing about popular culture texts or real world examples. This interactive allows students to create their own trading card about a real or fictional person, place, object, event, or abstract concept. These cards are can be used with any type of book students are reading or subjects that they are studying, and make for an excellent prewriting exercise for students who are writing narrative stories and need to consider characters, setting, and plot. Specific prompts guide student through the various types of cards, expanding students' thinking from the basic information and description of the topic to making personal connections to the subject. The save capability gives students a way to work on a draft of their card and come back to it to rework and revise as necessary, and to save their finished product to share with friends and family. back to top

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