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Examples of Container Gardening, Raised Bed Garden, Vertical Tower Garden at the Great Park

Examples of Container Gardening, Raised Bed Garden, Vertical Tower Garden at the Great Park

Plantable: All-In-One Table & Trellis Hybrid Lets You Grow, Harvest and Eat Zahra Shahabi and Ollie Hammick/CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 Beyond the conventional planter on your balcony, there are many ways to grow food and herbs right in your own home, without the need to rely on a trip to the store. London-based designers Jamie Elliott and Liam Healy of JAILmake created this table that's a mix of eating surface and mini-garden, where the legs are re-fashioned as planters and trellises to support climbing plants. Jaime and Liam describe the motivation behind this simple but intriguing design they call "Plantable", which is handmade to order in their South East London workshop using English oak and metal: The Plantable reintroduces nature back into the experience of gathering, cooking and eating a meal. So far, they've tried and tested climbers, tomatoes, herbs and sweet peas. You can see more of JAILmake's hand-crafted work on their website.

Urban Agriculture: A Guide to Container Gardens A Guide to Container Gardens With inexpensive containers and suitable soil mix,you can create an urban garden virtually anywhere - on roof tops,vacant city lots, borwn fields, and unused portion of parking lots Job S. Ebenezer, Ph.D.President, Technology for the Poor, 877 PELHAM COURT, WESTERVILLE, OHIO - 43081technologyforthepoor@yahoo.com It is estimated that by 2030 AD nearly 50% of the world’s population may live in urban areas. As a consequence of this many millions of acres of productive farmland are expected to be lost to housing and other usage. Due to the recent terrorist attacks, food security and safety are seriously compromised. Migration from rural areas also brings into the urban areas many persons with very little formal education. Urban agriculture has the potential for creating micro-enterprises that can be owned and operated by the community members without too much of initial capital. Urban farming is not new. Wading pools should be set on a level ground.

Habdjgjfjf One Glassy Garden: Growing Herbs in Mason Jars | Kitchen Garden Forget the usual terracotta and (ugh!) plastic pots for container gardening. When you grow herbs in mason jars, you can have garden fresh ingredients on hand and also add some style to a sunny windowsill. Picture a row of mason jars filled with different herbs—basil, chives, parsley, cilantro, thyme, rosemary—dressing up your kitchen. With the right conditions—ample light and proper drainage—most herbs are extremely easy to grow, and growing them in mason jars is no different. 1. 2. 3. Finally, add some labels so you won’t forget what you planted! You diy, recycling junkies could also use pasta jars, pickle jars or whatever other glass container you come across for this project. image: B_Zedan Soda Bottle Carrots Seventeen days after I planted carrots in a sawed-off soda bottle, young carrot tops had sprouted on the windowsill in my basement. I encourage people who have little space that they can still grow small kitchen gardens. To that end, on May 1st I cut the top off of a two-liter soda bottle, filled the bottle with soil, and planted carrots in it. I described this project in a post titled Small Kitchen Garden Carrots in Containers. Mature Container Carrots After three months of growing, a carrot of nearly any variety should be mature. After three months of growth, my container carrots have pathetic tops. So, my container carrots—a variety that matures in 65 days—ought to be dropping seeds all over my deck. The good news is that those sickly-looking carrot tops protrude from very pronounced orange carrot shoulders. Pushing Plants When my container carrots started to look bad, I took some steps to pep them up: I pulled a carrot to provide a bit more space in the soil (I’d planted 11 seeds).

OmegaGarden.com - Omega Gardens™: Industry Leading Hydroponics Designs for Indoor Gardening Container Gardening Vegetable - Lettuce is the Perfect Container Gardening Vegetable I love growing lettuce. It's fast, easy and is the perfect container gardening vegetable. One advantage of growing lettuce in a container garden is that it easier to protect it from pests. I've had too many lettuce plants devoured before I get a chance to eat them. I put my lettuce container gardens up on tables or chairs to protect them from the legions of woodchucks, squirrels and bunnies that love to feast on my lettuce. You can grow lettuce in almost any container, as long as it has good drainage. You do have to be careful with any metal container, in the blistering hot sun because they can get hot and cook your plants root system. Here's what you need to make a lettuce container garden in a colander: SunColanderPotting soilPlastic window screeningFertilizerLettuce seed or seedlings 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Great lettuces to try in container gardens: Black Seeded Simpson (heat tolerant)Simpson Elite (heat tolerant)Tropicana (heat tolerant)Elegance Seed Mix, from Johnny's SeedsMesclun mixes

Vertical Gardening Tips - Organic Gardening A few years back I was leading an old friend through my garden, all the while bemoaning my lack of growing space, when he suddenly interrupted me and asked, "Why do people build skyscrapers?" What this had to do with my overcrowded garden, I hadn't a clue. "So they can cram a lot of people into a place without using up much ground room?" I ventured. "Exactly. My friend was right. One more thing: Most bush varieties were bred from climbing ones, and many growers think the original climbing cultivars have better, old-fashioned flavor. Of course, short varieties do offer some conveniences. Best Trellis Supports For plants to grow up a trellis or other support, you first have to build it. Some common supports are wood posts, metal stakes and thick-walled rigid PVC pipe. Don't forget bamboo. Steel posts are less aesthetic than wooden ones but are quicker to install and move. Thick-walled rigid PVC pipe makes solid end or corner posts when buried two feet deep. Assembling Plant Supports

Strawberry Pallet Planter Over the past year I've come across scores of diy pallet projects, some of them intriguing and others not quite there yet but still having potential. One that I see time and again is the idea of using a single wooden pallet as a strawberry planter. Filled with soil and with plants inserted in the gaps they're usually leaned up against a wall but sometimes bolted on to keep from tumbling over. It's a clever idea but I've steered away from trying it myself because I suspect that they'll require constant watering and erosion control and also because I'm not convinced that they'll work long term. Still I was interested in the idea and with the gift of eight pristine wooden pallets, I started scouring the internet looking for alternative tutorials. First of all, choosing pallets for diy projects involves a bit of know-how. To help you find the right type of pallet for your project I've put together a diagram of what to look for when you spot one. You will need the following materials:

Re-Growing Green Onions: Grow Your Scallions Back on Your Windowsill Previous image Next image See these green and perky scallions? They weren't so perky a week ago. In fact, they were chopped down to their roots. But a scant week of water and a windowsill grew them back — did you ever learn how easy this is? • Read more: Wordless Wednesday - Regrowth at Homemade Serenity ...there were no words, and the picture didn't need any. I chopped off some scallions and stuck them root-down in a Mason jar above my sink. To my surprise, these grew fast. It might not work a second time; I am not sure how long you can keep regrowing these things. Have you ever tried this? Related: • How To Grow Your Own Alfalfa Sprouts: Part One• How To Grow Your Own Alfalfa Sprouts: Part Two (Images: Faith Durand)

Vegetable Gardening in Containers If you don't have space for a vegetable garden, consider raising fresh, nutritious, homegrown vegetables in containers. A windowsill, patio, balcony, or doorstep can provide sufficient space for a productive container garden. Problems with soil-borne diseases, nematodes, or poor soil can also be overcome by switching to container gardening. Grow vegetables that take up little space, such as carrots, radishes, and lettuce, or crops that bear fruits over a period of time, such as tomatoes and peppers, for best use of space and containers. The amount of sunlight your container garden receives determines what crops can be grown. Container gardening lends itself to attractive plantscaping. Containers There are many possible containers for gardening. Some gardeners have built vertical planters out of wood lattice work lined with black plastic and filled with a lightweight soil mix; or out of welded wire shaped into cylinders lined with sphagnum moss. Potting Soil (Media) Planting Watering

Let’s Make 2-Liter SIPs! Photo: Rachel Glass My mom and I have really been expanding our gardening knowledge lately. Though there is a lot more to learn, we have been sharing that gardening knowledge with kids and families in our community. When we were asked to teach children at a special event sponsored by the AUA (Advocates for Urban Agriculture) and Hull House, we decided to teach a workshop on making SIPs. A SIP is a Sub Irrigated Planter. Sub meaning bottom, irrigated meaning watered, and planter meaning… well you know. “First the water at the bottom of the SIP is wicked or sucked up by the fabric. After teaching the Becker girls (above) how to make SIPs I took a quick break. My mom and I invented the seed match game so people could learn what seeds go to which plants. The Becker girls extraordinarily (unlike some other kids I’ve taught) seemed to want to learn more about gardening. After the kids constructed their SIPs, we gave them chocolate mint seedlings to plant in their new homemade planters.

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