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TWT: Inquiry-based Learning Strategy

TWT: Inquiry-based Learning Strategy
What is Inquiry-based learning? The old adage, “Tell me and I forget, show me and I remember, involve me and I understand” describes the core of inquiry-based learning. Inquiry is the process of seeking truth, information, or knowledge by questioning. Questioning! That is the key. The process of inquiring begins with gathering information and data through applying the human senses: seeing, hearing, touching, tasting, and smelling. Inquiry-based learning processes vary. How does inquiry-based learning encourage student learning? Memorizing facts and information is not the most important skill in today’s world. What does inquiry-based learning look like in the classroom? The following example elaborates on the five steps listed above: questioning, planning and predicting, investigating, recording and reporting, and reflecting. Additional Information on the Five Steps for Inquiry-based Learning Questioning, Planning and Predicting, Investigating, Recording and Reporting, and Reflecting. Related:  Inquiry-Based Learning

Learning Science Through Inquiry Frequently Asked Questions About Inquiry Workshop 1 | Workshop 2 | Workshop 3 | Workshop 4 | Workshop 5 Workshop 6 | Workshop 7 | Workshop 8 Contributing Authors: Christine Collier - principal of the Center for Inquiry, a K-8 magnet/option school in the Indianapolis Public School district Judith Johnson - associate professor of science education at the University of Central Florida; associate director of the Lockheed Martin/University of Central Florida Academy of Mathematics and Science Lisa Nyberg - assistant professor in the education department at California State University, Fresno Virginia Lockwood - staff developer and consultant, District 2 New York City 1. Inquiry teaching is allowing students’ questions and curiosities to drive curriculum. 2. In an inquiry-based classroom, students aren't waiting for the teacher or someone else to provide an answer — instead, they are actively seeking solutions, designing investigations, and asking new questions. 3. top 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12.

Teaching and Learning for a Sustainable Future | Module 23: Enquiry learning Introduction The development of thinking and problem solving skills is an important objective of Education for Sustainable Development, especially given the urgency of problems facing the world today. These skills can be taught and enhanced through enquiry learning. Enquiry learning is a learner-centred approach that emphasises higher order thinking skills. This module clarifies the characteristics of enquiry learning and illustrates strategies for teaching through enquiry-based approaches. Objectives To develop an understanding of enquiry-based teaching and learning strategies; To develop skills in planning for enquiry-based learning; and To illustrate ways of evaluating enquiry-based teaching and learning. Activities References Barrett,T., MacLabhrainn, I. and Fallon, H. Boud, D. and Feletti, G. (1997) The Challenge of Problem-based Learning (2nd Edition), Routledge. Duch, B.J., Groh, S.E. and Allen, D.E. Gough, N. (1992) Blueprints for Greening Schools, Gould League, Melbourne Credits

Inquiry-based Learning: Explanation What are the benefits of inquiry-based learning? One of the important missing pieces in many modern schools is a coherent and simplified process for increasing knowledge of a subject from lower grades to upper grades. Students often have difficulty understanding how various activities within a particular subject relate to each other. Much more confusion results when the learner tries to interrelate the various subjects taught at school. Too little effort is devoted to defining important outcomes at the end of high school and planning backwards and across subjects. Specific content such as photosynthesis has much more relevance for the learner if set in a larger context of understanding the interrelationship of the sun, green plants, and the role of carbon dioxide and water. Within a conceptual framework, inquiry learning and active learner involvement can lead to important outcomes in the classroom.

Enquiry/problem-based learning Whilst EBL has clear parallels with problem-based learning (or PBL), in that the solution of a ‘problem’ serves to shape the whole learning experience of the students, it is usually viewed as covering a broader spectrum of approaches. Further, as noted by the HEA Guide to Curriculum Design, ‘EBL is perhaps more open to divergent ways of thinking about problems, more open to exploring and understanding different ways of perceiving the world and less concerned with providing firm solutions to problems that do not have simple or unique solutions’. (Kahn and O’Rourke 2004). This is supported by Price (2003) who notes that both approaches share a number of philosophical premises: ‘Simply put, these are that you have a great deal to gain from active study that involves you in inductive and deductive thinking and which requires that you work closely with others, within small study groups, to make sense of the practice environment and the challenges that exist there.’ enquiry based learning;

INQUIRY-BASED LEARNING - About Us Creating Classrooms We Need: 8 Ways Into Inquiry Learning If kids can access information from sources other than school, and if school is no longer the only place where information lives, what, then happens to the role of this institution? “Our whole reason for showing up for school has changed, but infrastructure has stayed behind,” said Diana Laufenberg, who taught history at the progressive public school Science Leadership Academy for many years. Laufenberg provided some insight into how she guided students to find their own learning paths at school, and enumerated some of these ideas at SXSWEdu last week. 1. Laufenberg recalled a group of tenacious students who continued to ask permission to focus their video project on the subject of drugs, despite her repeated objections. 2. Laufenberg’s answer: Get them curious enough in the subject to do research on their own. “Rather than saying, ‘We’re going to study immigration,’ I took them through a process where they become interested in it themselves,” she said. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Related

Who Wants to Know? Use Student Questions to Drive Learning Martin Luther King, Jr. considered this to be life's most persistent and urgent question: "What are you doing for others?" As we approach the holiday that honors his legacy, here's another question worth pondering: How many of your students know how to ask persistent and urgent questions of their own? Knowing how to formulate a good question -- and having the courage to ask it -- is a skill with profound social justice implications. That was more than 20 years ago. In their important and accessible book, Make Just One Change: Teach Students to Ask Their Own Questions, the co-authors outline a simple but powerful approach to put classroom questions where they belong: with students. The co-authors' Question Formulation Technique is appropriate for any classroom. Ask as many questions as you can. I'd argue that their approach belongs in the toolkit of any teacher implementing project-based learning. The problem might be that the project focus doesn't connect with students' interests.

Design-Based Learning (DBL) to Innovate STEM Education | Stanford University School of Education IT Our earthquake curriculum project We developed an earthquake curriculum to conduct design-based pilot studies all over the globe from Ethiopia to California in 5th, 6th grade classes and a multi-grade classroom in El Salvador. Learning about earthquakes is urgent and propitious with the recent earthquake catastrophes in Haiti and Chile. It is crucial to raise awareness in our young learners that an earthquake in one continent can have ripple effect damages to other continents. In the future, we expect our future leaders to collaborate to understand the natural phenomena and embrace ourselves to prepare and respond together. Within the design challenge, students worked in teams of 4 members to design and build earthquake resistant structures using only index cards, tape, and paper clips through couple of iterations. Throughout our pilot studies, students were enthusiastic, focused, and actively collaborating with their peers. Sub Project

What is Inquiry Based Learning? How to Study Help students learn to study well. We offer a number of great resources. View Study Skills Graphic Organizers Great printable graphic organizers for all subjects and grade levels! View Organizers What is Inquiry Based Learning? Inquiry based learning is mainly involving the learner and leading him to understand. Dictionary meaning of Inquiry is seeking knowledge, information, or truth through questioning. Very sadly, our traditional ways of teaching discourage the process of inquiry. Much mesmerizing information and facts are readily available, which needs an understanding of how to make sense out of it and turn it into useful knowledge. Inquiry based learning can be applied on all disciplines which has been confirmed through different researches. The teachers must organize their lesson plans according to the changing, interrelating, and communicating of knowledge. Go Deeper Into Our Inquiry-Based Learning Categories Equity in Education Basics

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