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Copyright Website

Copyright Website

http://www.copyrightwebsite.com/

Related:  Ethical Use of InformationCopyright and Fair Use

Avoiding Plagiarism Summary: There are few intellectual offenses more serious than plagiarism in academic and professional contexts. This resource offers advice on how to avoid plagiarism in your work. Contributors:Karl Stolley, Allen Brizee, Joshua M. Learning Resources: Copyright Issues What is intellectual property? Is it okay to copy information such as words and pictures from a book, a CD-ROM, or the Internet? Do I need to get permission to link to someone's website? How can I tell if a student has copied their report from the web?

Fifth grade Lesson in Writing Plagiarism Connection (3-5 mins): Students should be seated on the carpet with a partner. They will be asked to turn and talk during this lesson with that partner. Researchers, you have all worked very hard to understand different sources and how we must cite those sources. This is important to know because if you do not give credit to authors, you would be guilty of plagiarism. Guide to Citing Online Sources Page 1 of 2 Do you ever use the Internet to get information or pictures for your reports? You may not know this, but it's important (not to mention courteous) to cite all your sources. Intellectual property is property. Copyright Fair Use and How it Works for Online Images You’ve heard the adage that a picture is worth a thousand words, but when that picture is protected by copyright, the picture is only worth three words: cease and desist. OK, that’s kind of a lawyer joke. But it illustrates how protective people are about finding their images used online without permission. Copyright laws were established not to give the author the right to deny their work to other people, but instead to encourage its creation. Article I, Section 8, clause 8, of the United States Constitution states the purpose of copyright laws is “to promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts, by securing for limited times to Authors and Inventors the exclusive Right to their respective Writings and Discoveries.”

Top 10 Tips for Images and Copyrights to Avoid a Social Media Disaster Copyrights and social media always seem like this gray area that brands walk on eggshells over or just ignore completely, especially when it comes to images. Here are the top 10 tips on what you need to know to avoid a copyright disaster and maintain your brand’s integrity when it comes to images and social media. What is a copyright? Merrian-Webster dictionary defines copyright as “the exclusive legal right to reproduce, publish, sell, or distribute the matter and form of something (as a literary, musical or artistic work).” A copyright, in essence, protects the author and his or her creative expression of such work. Copyrighted works include books, photographs, movies and music.

Key Milestones In Social Media Law [Infographic] It’s the Wild West out here on the Internet. While individual social media companies face lawsuits over copyrights, privacy and antitrust violations, Washington debates bills like SOPA and PIPA to help redefine the law for the Digital Age. This infographic from the Socially Aware blog examines the key moments that led us to what can only be described as a hot, electrically-charged mess. The timeline begins appropriately in 1984 with Sony v. Universal Studios, when the U.S. Supreme Court decided that the VCR manufacturer was not liable for consumers using the Betamax video recorder to gleefully infringe Universal’s copyrights so long as the device could be used for other things.

CopyRIGHT Pathfinder on Copyright Law for Librarians The second CopyRIGHT Pathfinder, which is part of the 2013 Copyright Community, is now available. This Pathfinder is designed with brief descriptions and hyperlinks to guide you to primary and secondary sources on copyright law and licensing for librarians. All sources are vetted. Use your time reading about copyright law; not locating reliable resources! Copyright and Fair Use - UMUC Library Disclaimer The information presented here is only general information. Legal advice must be provided in the course of an attorney-client relationship specifically with reference to all the facts of the particular situation under consideration. Such is not the case here, and accordingly, the information presented here must not be relied on as a substitute for obtaining legal advice from a licensed attorney.

Copyright for Educators (US) This is a course for educators who want to learn about US copyright law in the education context. P2PU also offers a similar courses for Australia, if that content is more appropriate. Educators who are not in the US are welcome to sign up, too, if they want to learn about copyright law in the US. Creative Commons for K-12 Educators Update: The second round of this facilitated course is located at It is open for sign-up through August 4, 2013. This facilitated course ran for 7 weeks (March 18 - May 5, 2013). Rationale for the course

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