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James Paul Gee on Learning with Video Games

James Paul Gee on Learning with Video Games

Flow UDL Guidelines 2.0 The goal of education in the 21st century is not simply the mastery of content knowledge or use of new technologies. It is the mastery of the learning process. Education should help turn novice learners into expert learners—individuals who want to learn, who know how to learn strategically, and who, in their own highly individual and flexible ways, are well prepared for a lifetime of learning. Universal Design for Learning (UDL) helps educators meet this goal by providing a framework for understanding how to create curricula that meets the needs of all learners from the start. The UDL Guidelines, an articulation of the UDL framework, can assist anyone who plans lessons/units of study or develops curricula (goals, methods, materials, and assessments) to reduce barriers, as well as optimize levels of challenge and support, to meet the needs of all learners from the start. They can also help educators identify the barriers found in existing curricula. Learn more about the UDL Guidelines:

Example of Endogenous activities. Universal Design for Learning Universal Design for Learning (UDL) is an educational framework based on research in the learning sciences, including cognitive neuroscience, that guides the development of flexible learning environments that can accommodate individual learning differences.[1] Recognizing that the way individuals learn can be unique, the UDL framework, first defined by the Center for Applied Special Technology(CAST) in the 1990s,[2] calls for creating curriculum from the outset that provides: Multiple means of representation to give learners various ways of acquiring information and knowledge,Multiple means of expression to provide learners alternatives for demonstrating what they know, andMultiple means of engagement to tap into learners' interests, challenge them appropriately, and motivate them to learn.[3][4] Origins[edit] The concept and language of Universal Design for Learning was inspired by the universal design movement in architecture and product development, originally formulated by Ronald L.

Endogenous and Exogenous fantasy elements. Gridjumper's Blog | Collaborative 3D Environments for Teaching and Learning big misconception INFOGRAPHIC: Gaming in the Classroom: Why Bring Electronic Games into the Classroom? Gaming, wikis, blogs, social media, interactive polls and QR codes: just some of the technologies that teachers are bringing into the classroom. The dizzying pace of tech evolutions offers some challenges as teachers and administrators race to keep up with the latest tools. The research discussed here shows the payoff for schools that become "friends" with educational gaming. Experiments show how technology supports learning, with the potential to increase student engagement and motivation, even for students enrolled in college online. Still, the U.S. government reports a lack of nationwide studies on the use of tech tools and gaming in education. Sources: National Education Technology Plan – Executive Summary, Ed.gov, Technology in Education, Education Week, September 2011, For a complete list of sources, please view the Infographic.

GamesParentsTeachers :: Games Parents Teachers When to use games in education Integrating games into the classroom

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