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A Parent's Guide to 21st-Century Learning

A Parent's Guide to 21st-Century Learning
You’ll find a selection of outstanding online resources and projects, sorted by grade levels, to provide a glimpse of successful school programs. Elementary School: The World Peace Game Skype in the Classroom Peace Helpers Become Classroom Problem Solvers Middle School: Down the Drain Digiteen: Digital Citizenship for Teenagers World of Warcraft in School High School: World Youth News Digital Youth Network Money Corps: Finance Experts as Guest Teachers Across the Grades: More Ideas that Work Ten Tips to Bring 21st-Century Skills Home Resources: Bring the C's to Your School

Every Student Response Strategies | LessonCast True implementation of personalized learning in schools requires a shift in the roles of educators and a shift in educator professional learning. This course examines the evolving role of teachers incorporating personalized learning experiences in the classroom. Taking a close look at what personalized learning is and isn’t, participants create resources to support teacher roles as facilitator, assessor, instructional designer, content curator, coach, and advisor, and family-school collaborator. Lessoncast believes in personalized professional learning. While the course opens on July 21 (8:00 am EST), you may register at any time and complete the course activities at your own pace. Project Based Learning (image from education-world.com) Project Based Learning (PBL) is a great way to teach students content, 21st century skills, and engage them in something fun and educational. I spoke more about PBL in an earlier blog ( and we had some great reader comments (Tech&Learning, May 2009, page 14). Today I'd like to give some tips and ideas on how to get started with PBL in your classroom. First of all, PBL can be used in any classroom, in any subject, at any grade level. PBL does take planning. For instance, I teach physics and developed a project for my classes on structures and stress and strain. Another example of PBL is having the students research a topic and present it to the rest of the class through a multimedia presentation, website, or poster. Start small. Another idea for projects is to look at your school or community and see what they need. Some web resources to get you started:

Abdication of Education: How can we Re-engage Parents? It isn’t a decision that any of us made consciously or willingly, it’s more the result of circumstances, but as a society we have abdicated the education of our children to a specialized segment of society. That segment has taken the responsibility we’ve given it and created an intricately structured system of learning as well as a system of administration of that learning. So now, here we are, dissatisfied with the cost and effectiveness of those systems and wondering what we can do about it. It didn’t happen because we didn’t want to be involved, it’s more the result of the pace of our lives and the structure of the educational system which makes it very difficult to be involved. By the time our kids are teenagers, the closest some of us come to being involved in education is dropping them off at school or a bus stop. Every parent starts out being the most important teacher in their child’s life. Thankfully, other people have realized that same thing are are doing something about it.

Tips for Writing Instructional Objectives - Bloom's Taxonomy Job Aids I am so delighted to see this post that includes Bloom's Taxonomy Wheels by ZaidLearn. I always find that it's far easier to design materials using these wheels than it is to see the verbs/products in lists. Many instructional designers can benefit from these job aids when trying to find the right action verbs for their objectives. Here are some wheels for the cognitive domain. Source: Source: Source: Bloom’s digital taxonomy. Have fun, designers! Authentic, Hands-on Learning with Career and Technical Education I am a daily witness to outlandish potential and even more incredible reality as I see students fabricating complicated ductwork, reworking the plugs and wires on a V8 engine and interpreting the bitewing X-rays of dental patients. Career and technical education is about differentiated instruction, higher levels of thinking and essential questions. Can it be more? Exploring. When I construct a lesson for my crew, of course I focus on ushering them to comprehend the elements we are exploring. Collaboration to set a course; cooperation and more questioning. How does the career arena compare to its academic counterpart? End product. I remember my education psych class (which I was forced to take when I left the cooking field) and the very last words the instructor offered us. Sampling. "Just keep it relevant and everything else will take care of itself." That was it. And it is all happening in real time.

untitled Creative, child-centered art and literacy ideas and activities Seven Ways to Build Your Own Educational Games There are hundreds of places to find educational games and quizzes on the Internet. That said, sometimes you still cannot find quite what you're looking for. In those cases you're better off creating your own games. Here are seven good tools you and your students can use for creating games. Sharendipity makes it possible for students and teachers to quickly create and share simple video games. ClassTools.net is a free service teachers can use to create their own educational games. Purpose Games is a free service that allows users to create custom games, share games, and play games. What 2 Learn is a website offering more than two thousand educational games for middle school and high school age students. YoYo Games hosts hundreds of relatively simple online games created by amateur and professional game developers. Jeopardy Labs is a free service you can use to create your own online Jeopardy game.

untitled Literature Circle Models After experimenting for many years, I discovered an approach that's easy, fun, and effective. I refer to it as Classroom Book Clubs because it's a more relaxed method of doing Literature Circles that doesn't involve roles. You can view a narrated slidecast to this model by scrolling down to the Classroom Book Clubs section. On this page you can also learn about different types of Literature Circles. Ways to Structure Literature Circles Classroom Book Clubs - My favorite method at the moment is a flexible approach to Literature Circles that does not require the use of extensive handouts and assignment booklets. Classroom Book Clubs I love this model because it's a very flexible and fun approach. Mini Literature Circles (Using Leveled Readers) Are you required to use a basal reading program in your classroom? Assign 3 or 4 students to a leveled reader based on their reading level. Literature Circles with Roles Some students enjoy having roles within their Literature Circles.

Born to Learn ~ You are Born to Learn

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