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How to Grow and Store Potatoes, Onions, Garlic and Squash, Keeper Crops

How to Grow and Store Potatoes, Onions, Garlic and Squash, Keeper Crops
During the winter months, when the ground is covered by a thick blanket of snow, there’s something particularly satisfying about still being able to eat food from your garden. There are many summer-grown crops including potatoes, onions, garlic, beets, carrots and winter squash, can be stored with relative ease to nourish you right through until the next growing season. Even a modest-size garden can yield a substantial crop of winter keepers. To be successful storing these keeper crops at home, here are a couple factors to keep in mind: Some varieties store better than others, so be sure to seek out the ones that are known to be good keepers. Crops that are harvested at their prime – not before or after – store best. There are so many wonderful kinds and colors of potatoes to choose from: fingerlings, bakers, boilers, white, yellow, pink, red, and even blue. Potatoes can be grown in a standard garden row, in a raised bed or in a container such as a Potato Grow Bag. Onions Garlic

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One of earliest farming sites in Europe discovered University of Cincinnati research is revealing early farming in a former wetlands region that was largely cut off from Western researchers until recently. The UC collaboration with the Southern Albania Neolithic Archaeological Project (SANAP) will be presented April 20 at the annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology (SAA). Susan Allen, a professor in the UC Department of Anthropology who co-directs SANAP, says she and co-director Ilirjan Gjipali of the Albanian Institute of Archaeology created the project in order to address a gap not only in Albanian archaeology, but in the archaeology in Eastern Europe as a whole, by focusing attention on the initial transition to farming in the region. "For Albania, there has been a significant gap in documenting the Early Neolithic (EN), the earliest phase of farming in the region," explains Allen.

27 Medicinal Plants Worth Your Garden Space Playful as kids are, accidents happen. And the accident that befallen me at 7 years old was the feeling of the hot exhaust pipe of a motorcycle kissing the skin of my leg. Grandma was around and saw it. Immediately, she took out a knife and slice the thick lower part of the aloe vera plant by the garden and rubbed the exposed end on the burn. Looking back, I realized that it was important to have medicinal plants around the house cause you never know when you might need them.

20 Plants for garden pathways which can handle foot traffic There are infinite numbers of plants available to cultivate in your garden. But, there are very few varieties of plants that can be grown on pathways, because most of the plants are too sensitive to tolerate people’s feet. Here is a list of some very common plants which you can use to decorate the walkways of your garden. 1. How to Construct a Small Septic System Edit Article Edited by Tom Viren, Josh Hannah, James Quirk, Ben Rubenstein and 27 others Most private septic systems are made up of two parts: The holding and digesting tanks and the dispersal field. The system shown here is a small system, designed for limited use of by two people with no laundry and a small travel trailer.

Planting A Pineapple Did y’all know that you can take this and turn it into… This? And that this will eventually produce… This? Yes, I’m talking about turning your average, ordinary grocery store pineapple into a tropical showpiece within your home. Hanging Kitchen Herb Garden Doubles as Light Fixture June 3, 2013 by Robin Plaskoff Horton Landscape designer, Thibaut Delefortrie, and product designer, Eugénie Pfeil, combined creative forces to bring the garden into the kitchen, a collaboration that resulted in Klorofyll, a suspended light fixture that doubles as a hanging kitchen garden for growing aromatic herbs. Both functional and decorative, Klorofyll is part of the trend for growing one’s own, even if it’s just a few herbs, and also reflects consumer interest in personalization–users can decide how to use the product in a way that fits their personal lifestyle. Klorofyll’s 360° rotating cylinder contains six openings for removable planters, and two LED light rings which provide illumination, its electric wiring contained within the suspension cable and other technical parts inside one end of the module. As a pendant light, it provides functional lighting for the kitchen work space and at the same time enables cooks to snip culinary herbs from directly overhead.

Leafsnap, a new mobile app that identifies plants by leaf shape, is launched by Smithsonian and collaborators  The Smithsonian Institution, Columbia University and the University of Maryland have pooled their expertise to create the world’s first plant identification mobile app using visual search—Leafsnap. This electronic field guide allows users to identify tree species simply by taking a photograph of the tree’s leaves. In addition to the species name, Leafsnap provides high-resolution photographs and information about the tree’s flowers, fruit, seeds and bark—giving the user a comprehensive understanding of the species. Smithsonian botanist John Kress uses the new mobile app to correctly identify a katsura tree (Cercidiphyllum japonicum) growing in the Smithsonian’s Enid A.

DIY Organic Vertical Planter Ever wanted to grow plants but you didn't have enough room for them? Have you ever wanted to grow plants in a more water-friendly way? Are you tired of raking and your garden and pulling out those stubborn leaves or using harmful chemicals that are not healthy for you and damage the fruit's flavor and texture? The simple answer is a vertical planter: The vertical planter allows you to grow plants in a very small area limited only by height, and that too can be amended. It uses a water-friendly watering system where the water is not wasted but moves on to other plants. It needs no chemicals for those pesty weeds!

NPIN: Native Plant Database Welcome to the latest edition of the Native Plants Database where you can explore the wealth of native plants in North America. Use the options below to search for 7,927 native plants by scientific or common name or choose a particular family of plants. For non-native or introduced species, please visit the USDA Plants Database. Recommended Species lists Use the options below to search for plants based on a combination of characteristics.

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