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Nazi Camps

Nazi Camps
INTRODUCTION Between 1933 and 1945, Nazi Germany established about 20,000 camps to imprison its many millions of victims. These camps were used for a range of purposes including forced-labor camps, transit camps which served as temporary way stations, and killing centers built primarily or exclusively for mass murder. EARLY CAMPS From its rise to power in 1933, the Nazi regime built a series of detention facilities to imprison and eliminate so-called "enemies of the state." Most prisoners in the early concentration camps were German Communists, Socialists, Social Democrats, Roma (Gypsies), Jehovah's Witnesses, homosexuals, and persons accused of "asocial" or socially deviant behavior. After Germany's annexation of Austria in March 1938, the Nazis arrested German and Austrian Jews and imprisoned them in the Dachau, Buchenwald, and Sachsenhausen concentration camps, all located in Germany. Millions of people were imprisoned and abused in the various types of Nazi camps.

Concentration Camps, 1933–1939 Concentration camps (Konzentrationslager; abbreviated as KL or KZ) were an integral feature of the regime in Nazi Germany between 1933 and 1945. The term concentration camp refers to a camp in which people are detained or confined, usually under harsh conditions and without regard to legal norms of arrest and imprisonment that are acceptable in a constitutional democracy. THE FIRST CONCENTRATION CAMPS IN GERMANY The first concentration camps in Germany were established soon after Hitler's appointment as chancellor in January 1933. In the weeks after the Nazis came to power, The SA (Sturmabteilungen; commonly known as Storm Troopers), the SS (Schutzstaffel; Protection Squadrons—the elite guard of the Nazi party), the police, and local civilian authorities organized numerous detention camps to incarcerate real and perceived political opponents of Nazi policy. Special “political units on alert” (Politische Bereitschaften) originally guarded the SS concentration camps.

Forced labour under German rule during World War II The use of forced labour in Nazi Germany and throughout German-occupied Europe during World War II took place on an unprecedented scale.[1] It was a vital part of the German economic exploitation of conquered territories. It also contributed to the mass extermination of populations in German-occupied Europe. The Nazi Germans abducted approximately 12 million people from almost twenty European countries; about two thirds of whom came from Eastern Europe.[2] Many workers died as a result of their living conditions, mistreatment, malnutrition, or became civilian casualties of war. At its peak the forced labourers comprised 20% of the German work force. Counting deaths and turnover, about 15 million men and women were forced labourers at one point or another during the war.[3] The liberation of Germany in 1945 freed 11 million foreigners, called "displaced persons" – chiefly forced labourers and POWs. Forced workers[edit] Classifications[edit] Young Polish girl wearing Letter "P" patch.

War Relocation Camps in Arizona 1942-1946 On March 18, 1942, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order No. 9102, "Establishing the War Relocation Authority in the Executive Office of the President and Defining its Functions and Duties." This order created a civilian agency in the Office for Emergency Management to provide for the removal of persons or classes of people from designated areas as previously denoted under Executive Order No. 9066. The Authority embarked on a rapid trajectory of planning and building 10 relocation camps that would house more than 110,000 Japanese Americans who lived chiefly inside the boundaries of Military District 1 along the Pacific Coast. A map shows how the WRA dispersed the camps across the western United States. This Web exhibit features images from approximately forty photographs taken for the War Relocation Authority and vividly depicts life in Arizona's two camps. Two of the larger camps that received the trainloads of evacuees were located in Arizona.

Holocaust Timeline: The Camps In January 1942, SS official Reinhard Heydrich held a meeting of Nazi government officials to present the Final Solution. At this meeting, known as the Wannsee Conference , the Nazi officials agreed to SS plans for the transport and destruction of all 11 million Jews of Europe. The Nazis would use the latest in twentieth century technology, cost efficient engineering and mass production techniques for the sole purpose of killing off the following racial groups: Jews, Russian prisoners of war, and Gypsies (Sinti-Roma). Their long-range plans, unrealized, included targeting some 30 million Slavs for death. Wannsee Conference entry from the Encyclopedia of the Holocaust. Minutes of the Wannsee Conference planning the annihilation of over 11 million European Jews. Starting early in 1942, the Jewish genocide (sometimes called the Judeocide) went into full operation. Ultimately, the Nazis were responsible for the deaths of some 2.7 million Jews in the death camps. Many photographs of Buchenwald.

Nazi Concentration Camps Video Nazi concentration and death camps were the infrastructure that allowed the widespread killing of Jews and other minorities during the Holocaust. Watch this About.com video to learn more about the history behind the Nazi concentration camps.See Transcript Hello, I am Mary Jensen I am an AP world history teacher at Boulder High School in Boulder, Colorado. What is a Concentration Camp? The term concentration camp is an umbrella term for the overall detention of prisoners. Nazi Ideology Behind Concentration and Death Camps The Nazi ideology believed that the Jews were an inferior group of people. The six designated death camps were Aushwitz-Birkenau, Sobibor, Treblinka, Majdanek, Chelmno and Belznec;all were located in Poland. One of the more notorious aspects of these camps was the medical experimentation. German Efficiency in the Concentration Camps Essentially there was no getting out of these camps once they were delivered there by train, with very specific timetables of these trains.

Holocaust Timeline Jump to: 1938 1939 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1933 January 30, 1933 - Adolf Hitler is appointed Chancellor of Germany a nation with a Jewish population of 566,000. February 22, 1933 - 40,000 SA and SS men are sworn in as auxiliary police. February 27, 1933 - Nazis burn Reichstag building to create crisis atmosphere. February 28, 1933 - Emergency powers granted to Hitler as a result of the Reichstag fire. March 22, 1933 - Nazis open Dachau concentration camp near Munich, to be followed by Buchenwald near Weimar in central Germany, Sachsenhausen near Berlin in northern Germany, and Ravensbrück for women. Terms of use: Private home/school non-commercial, non-Internet re-usage only is allowed of any text, graphics, photos, audio clips, other electronic files or materials from The History Place.

Daily Life in the Concentration Camps The first concentration camp in the Nazi system, Dachau, opened in March, 1933. By the end of World War II, the Nazis administered a massive system of more than 40,000 camps that stretched across Europe from the French-Spanish border into the conquered Soviet territories, and as far south as Greece and North Africa. The largest number of prisoners were Jews, but individuals were arrested and imprisoned for a variety of reasons, including ethnicity and political affiliation. Prisoners were subjected to unimaginable terrors from the moment they arrived in the camps; it was a dehumanizing existence that involved a struggle for survival against a system designed to annihilate them. Within the camps, the Nazis established a hierarchical identification system and prisoners were organized based on nationality and grounds for incarceration. Background Information « top » Berenbaum, Michael, and Yisrael Gutman, editors. Personal Accounts « top » Antelme, Robert. Online Resources « top »

Economy of Nazi Germany World War I and the subsequent Treaty of Versailles with its severe reparations[1] imposed on Germany led to a decade of economic woes, including hyperinflation in the mid-1920s. Following the Wall Street Crash of 1929, the German economy, like those of many other western nations, suffered the effects of the Great Depression, with unemployment soaring. When Hitler became Chancellor in 1933, he introduced new efforts to improve Germany's economy, including autarky and the development of the German agricultural economy by placing tariffs on agricultural imports.[2] However, these changes—including autarky and nationalization of key industries—had a mixed record. By 1938, unemployment was practically extinct.[3] Wages increased by 10.9% in real terms during this period.[4] However, nationalization and a cutting off of trade meant rationing in key resources like poultry, fruit, and clothing for many Germans.[5] Political economy of Nazi Germany[edit] Pre-war economy: 1933–1939[edit]

Concentration Camps The concentration camps, 1933-1945 The Nazis set up their first concentration camp, Dachau, in the wake of Hitler’s takeover of power in 1933. By the end of the war, 22 main concentration camps were established, together with around 1,200 affiliate camps, Aussenkommandos, and thousands of smaller camps. In 1945, when Allied forces liberated the concentration camps at Dachau, Bergen-Belsen, Buchenwald, Sachsenhausen, Auschwitz and elsewhere, the world was shocked at the sight of images of dead bodies alongside half-dead people in these camps. This was the remains of the Nazis’ horrible crime, to imprison people in camps because of their “otherness” or in order to use them for forced labour. A concentration camp was not the same as an extermination camp – camps constructed with the specific purpose of mass murdering Jews and other victim groups. At the beginning, the first inmates in concentration camps were political opponents of the Nazi regime. Forced labour The victims Extermination camps

Forced labour under German rule during World War II The use of forced labour in Nazi Germany and throughout German-occupied Europe during World War II took place on an unprecedented scale.[1] It was a vital part of the German economic exploitation of conquered territories. It also contributed to the mass extermination of populations in German-occupied Europe. The Nazi Germans abducted approximately 12 million people from almost twenty European countries; about two thirds of whom came from Eastern Europe.[2] Many workers died as a result of their living conditions, mistreatment, malnutrition, or became civilian casualties of war. At its peak the forced labourers comprised 20% of the German work force. Counting deaths and turnover, about 15 million men and women were forced labourers at one point or another during the war.[3] The liberation of Germany in 1945 freed 11 million foreigners, called "displaced persons" – chiefly forced labourers and POWs. Forced workers[edit] Classifications[edit] Young Polish girl wearing Letter "P" patch.

WO II - 5. De Britten en de Woestijnvos | Kunst en Cultuur: Oorlog De Tweede Wereldoorlog. De Duitsers hebben de geallieerden vernederd in Europa. In Noord-Afrika echter behalen ze de eerste grote overwinning. Ze ondervinden hevige tegenstand van de Duitsers onder leiding van Erwin Rommel, de Woestijnvos. De Britten en de Woestijnvos 9 december 1940. De Duitsers vechten terug In Berlijn heeft Hitler genoeg van zijn Italiaanse collega Mussolini. Gesteund door de Luftwaffe dringt het Afrikakorps de Britten terug. De Britten boeken (tijdelijke) overwinning Op 18 november lanceren de Britten een nieuw offensief om de stad te ontzetten. Lees verder

The Nazis sent the Jewish people in concentration camps where they have been tortured and killed. The concentration camps were much like the residental schools for the Sweetgrass Basket. In the Sweetgrass Basket, the residental schools were not as violent as the concentration camps, but they were often abused which sometimes lead them to death as well. by jason.k99 Oct 28

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