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Christopher Nolan

Christopher Nolan
Christopher Jonathan James Nolan (/ˈnoʊlən/; born 30 July 1970)[1] is an British-American film director, screenwriter, and producer. He has created several of the most critically and commercially successful films of the early 21st century. His nine films have grossed over $4.2 billion worldwide and garnered a total of 26 Oscar nominations and seven awards. Early life[edit] Nolan was born in London. His British father, Brendan James Nolan, was an advertising executive,[3] and his American mother, Christina (née Jensen), worked as a flight attendant and English teacher.[4][5][6] His childhood was split between London and Chicago, and he has both British and American citizenship.[7][8] He has an older brother, Matthew, and a younger brother, Jonathan.[9] Nolan began making films at age seven, borrowing his father's Super 8 camera and shooting short films with his action figures.[10][11] From the age of 11, he aspired to be a professional filmmaker.[9] Career[edit] 1990s[edit] 2000s[edit] Related:  M-Z

Steve McQueen (director) McQueen was born in London and is of Grenadian[9] descent.[10][11] He grew up in Hanwell, West London and went to Drayton Manor High School.[12][13] In a 2014 interview, McQueen stated that he had a very bad experience in school, where he had been placed into a class for students believed best suited "for manual labour, more plumbers and builders, stuff like that." Later, the new head of the school would admit that there had been "institutional" racism at the time. McQueen added that he was dyslexic and had to wear an eyepatch due to a lazy eye, and reflected this may be why he was "put to one side very quickly".[11] He was a keen football player, turning out for the St. Bear (1993) was McQueen's first major film, presented at the Royal College of Art in London. Five Easy Pieces (1995) is a short film by McQueen. Just Above My Head (1996) is a short film which shares close ties with McQueen's preceding film with the key theme of walking. Brockington, Horace.

George Lucas George Walton Lucas (born May 14, 1944) is an American film director, screenwriter, producer, and entrepreneur. He founded Lucasfilm and led the company as chairman and chief executive before selling it to The Walt Disney Company on October 30, 2012.[3] He is best known as the creator of the space opera franchise Star Wars and the archaeologist adventurer character Indiana Jones. Lucas is one of the American film industry's most financially successful filmmakers and has been nominated for four Academy Awards. Early life and education George Lucas was born in Modesto, California, the son of Dorothy Ellinore Lucas (née Bomberger; 1913–1989) and George Walton Lucas, Sr. (1913–1991), who owned a stationery store.[4][5] After graduating with a bachelor of fine arts in film in 1967, he tried joining the United States Air Force as an officer, but he was immediately turned down because of his numerous speeding tickets. Film career Lucas at the Venice Film Festival in 2009.

David O. Russell Three of Russell's most recent films were critically acclaimed and commercial hits: The Fighter (2010), Silver Linings Playbook (2012), and American Hustle (2013). These films have earned Russell three Academy Award nominations for Best Director, as well as a Best Adapted Screenplay nomination for Silver Linings Playbook and a Best Original Screenplay nomination for American Hustle. Early life[edit] Russell was born in New York City to Maria (née Muzio) and Bernard (Markovski)[1][2][3] Russell. Russell received his A.B. degree from Amherst College, where he majored in English and Politics, in 1981.[4][19] He wrote his senior thesis on the United States intervention in Chile from 1963 to 1973.[20] Career[edit] Early career[edit] Russell directed a documentary about Panamanian immigrants in Boston,[23] which led to a job as a production assistant on a PBS series called Smithsonian World.[8] Spanking the Monkey[edit] Flirting with Disaster[edit] Three Kings[edit] I Heart Huckabees[edit]

Pi (1998 Paul Schrader Schrader's upbringing and critical writing[edit] Schrader was born in Grand Rapids, Michigan, the son of Joan (née Fisher) and Charles A. Schrader, an executive.[1] Schrader's family practiced in the Calvinist Christian Reformed Church,[2][3] and his early life was based upon the religion's strict principles and parental education. He did not see a film until he was seventeen years old, and was able to sneak away from home. In an interview he stated that The Absent-Minded Professor was the first film he saw. The September–October 2006 issue of Film Comment magazine published his essay Canon Fodder which attempted to establish criteria for judging film masterworks. Other film-makers who made a lasting impression on Schrader are John Ford, Jean Renoir, Roberto Rossellini, Alfred Hitchcock and Sam Peckinpah. Film career[edit] In 1999, Schrader received the Laurel Award for Screenwriting Achievement from the Writers Guild of America. Theatre career[edit] Themes[edit] Filmography[edit]

Hugo (2011) Otto Preminger Otto Ludwig Preminger (5 December 1905 – 23 April 1986) was an Austrian American theatre and film director. Early life[edit] My father believed that it was impossible to be too kind or too loving to a child. He never punished me. After the assassination in 1914 of Archduke Franz Ferdinand, the heir to the throne, which led to the Great War, Russia entered the war on the Serbian side. After a year in Graz, the decisive public prosecutor was summoned to Vienna, where he was offered an eminent position, roughly equivalent to that of the United States Attorney General. Career[edit] Theater[edit] As the war came to an end, Markus formed his own law practice. Preminger explained to his father that a career in theater was not just a ploy to excuse himself from school. Reinhardt may have had reservations about Preminger's acting but he quickly detected the young man's abilities as an administrator. Hollywood[edit] Sam Spiegel accompanied Preminger from Vienna to Paris by train. Laura[edit]

Courage Courage is the choice and willingness to confront agony, pain, danger, uncertainty or intimidation. Physical courage is courage in the face of physical pain, hardship, death or threat of death, while moral courage is the ability to act rightly in the face of popular opposition, shame, scandal or discouragement. In some traditions, fortitude holds approximately the same meaning. In the Western tradition, notable thoughts on courage have come from philosophers such as Aristotle, Aquinas and Kierkegaard; in the Eastern tradition, some thoughts on courage were offered by the Tao Te Ching. More recently, courage has been explored by the discipline of psychology. Theories of courage[edit] Western antiquity and the Middle Ages[edit] Ancient Greece[edit] An early Greek philosopher, Plato (c. 428 BCE – c. 348 BCE),[1] set the groundwork for how courage would be viewed to future philosophers. Ancient Rome[edit] Medieval philosophy[edit] According to Thomas Aquinas,[10] Christianity[edit] Modernity[edit]

Agnès Varda Agnès Varda (born 30 May 1928) is a French film director and professor at the European Graduate School.[1] Her films, photographs, and art installations focus on documentary realism, feminist issues, and social commentary — with a distinct experimental style. Early life[edit] Varda was born Arlette Varda in Ixelles (Brussels), Belgium, the daughter of Christiane (née Pasquet) and Eugène Jean Varda, an engineer on May 30, 1928.[2] Her mother was French and her father came from a family of Greek refugees from Asia Minor. When she was a teenager, she escaped Belgium in 1940 and fled to Sète, France to live with the rest of her family. Personal life[edit] While living in Paris, she met her husband, Jacques Demy. Varda was one of the five people to attend Jim Morrison's burial in 1971 in Paris at the Père Lachaise Cemetery. Varda's handprints at Cannes Professional life[edit] Agnès Varda is a significant figure in modern French cinema. Involvement in the French New Wave[edit] Style[edit]

Ghost in the Shell (1995 Billy Wilder Billy Wilder (/ˈwaɪldər/; German: [ˈvɪldɐ]; June 22, 1906[1] – March 27, 2002) was an Austrian-born American filmmaker, screenwriter, producer, artist and journalist, whose career spanned more than 50 years and 60 films. He is regarded as one of the most brilliant and versatile filmmakers of Hollywood's golden age. Wilder is one of only five people to have won Academy Awards as producer, director and screenwriter for the same film (The Apartment), and was the first person to accomplish this.[2] Life and career[edit] Austria and Germany[edit] Born Samuel Wilder to a Jewish family in Sucha Beskidzka, Austria-Hungary (it was the part of Poland that had been subjugated to the Austria-Hungary empire following the eighteenth-century partitions of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth and after the end of WWI Poland again) to Max and Eugenia (née Dittler) Wilder, he was nicknamed Billie by his mother (he changed that to "Billy" after arriving in America). Hollywood career[edit]

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