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Top 10… Foods To Forage - Green Living

Top 10… Foods To Forage - Green Living
Thanks to modern agricultural methods, foraging – once a part of the majority’s daily life – has faded away, replaced by regular trips to the supermarket instead. Recently, however, there has been a revival of interest in raiding nature’s larder thanks to increased awareness of the health benefits of wild food, not to mention the TV exploits of Bear Grylls, Ray Mears and co. But it foraging is about more than just food. It gets us out into the countryside and helps to cultivate an intimate appreciation of nature, re-establishing a connection severed by modern urban life. But for the beginner, foraging should come with a health warning as it’s easy to mistake a deadly fungus for an innocent field mushroom. Mushrooms Neither animal nor vegetable, mushrooms are a type of fungi and the largest living organisms on Earth, some reaching three miles in length. Wild Garlic Wild garlic is a good all-rounder. Elder There are more uses for elderflowers than for any other type of blossom. Related:  Gardening & Foragingmarywith

9 Common Edible Garden Weeds All too often, homeowners and gardeners wage war in their lawns and gardens against the plants that grow incredibly well there, but that aren't intentionally planted, and many times, the justification for these battles all comes down to the words we use to describe them. When we buy and plant packets of common flower, vegetable, or herb seeds, we spend a lot of time, energy, and water in our efforts to get those seeds to germinate and grow, and take pride in our green thumb and homegrown food supply. But when a plant that we identify as being a weed is found growing in our lawn or garden, out comes the trowel and hoe (or for the ruthless and impatient gardeners, weedkillers such as RoundUp), and we may spend the entire growing season keeping these opportunistic and resilient plants at bay, in order to have neat and tidy garden beds and uniform lawns. 1. Dandelion 2. ZooFari/CC BY 3.0 3. Cliff/CC BY 3.0 4. Wendell Smith/CC BY 3.0 5. Calin Darabus/CC BY 3.0 6. Leslie Seaton/CC BY 3.0 7. 8. 9.

5 Invasive Plants You Can Eat The logic of eating wild plants is obvious; the logic of eating invasive wild plants is even more so. Culling aggressive species that have a negative impact on native plants, while avoiding the environmental pitfalls of agriculture? And free, local and abundant? Invasive plants are non-native species that can thrive in areas beyond their natural range of dispersal. According to the Land Management Bureau, millions of acres of once-healthy, productive rangelands, forestlands and riparian areas have been overrun by noxious or invasive plants. So what can we do? 1. Native range: Old World, probably Southeast Asian in origin Invasive range: Throughout North America Habitat: Rocky bluffs, barnyards, gardens, sidewalk cracks, disturbed areas; widely found in city lots. Because of it is a prolific producer of seeds, common purslane (pictured above) can rapidly take over warm, moist sites. 2. The pretty leaves are alternate, egg shaped; stems are hollow. 3. 4. 5.

Wild Edible Foraging for wild food is a great way to experience the natural world and connect with something ancient and primal within ourselves. And in many ways, it can be a more healthy alternative to the assembly line foods we find at the grocery store. Not only is wild food much richer in essential vitamins and minerals, but foraging also provides much needed exercise. Proper Identification Before eating any wild plant, make 100% sure it's not poisonous. Learn the few dangerous species in your area before venturing into the wild to forage. Don't rely on common names. Find a mentor. Use all of your senses. Learn habitat. Learn companion plants. Learn to follow wild edible plants through all seasons. Another reason to follow wild edible plants through the seasons is to locate perennial plants that you want to harvest in early spring. Learn which parts of a wild edible plant are safe to use. Conservation Don't over harvest. Avoid foraging rare and protected wild edible plants. Safety Happy foraging!

Food Foraging: Find Wild Edible Plants - Mother Earth News We owe a lasting debt of gratitude to the desperate soul who “discovered” the oyster or stewed that first possum. In the early, hit-or-miss days of foraging, our ancestors learned the hard way about the laxative properties of the senna plant, and to eat only the stems of rhubarb and not the poisonous leaves. Through trial and the occasional fatal error, we sorted the edible from the inedible, the useful from the harmful. After World War II, when American agriculture was fully conquered by industry and supermarkets full of frozen foods popped up across the land — yes, like weeds — foraging came to be regarded as uncouth, probably unhealthy and certainly out of step with modern times. Why then, a half-century later, do we find purslane — a vigorous, succulent “weed” once routinely cursed by gardeners — on the menu of nearly every fine dining restaurant in the country? Kerri Conan blogs for The New York Times, and keeps a sharp eye on food trends. Learning the Art of Food Foraging 1. 2. 3.

Food Foraging: Wild Edible Plants & Mushrooms Wild Medicinal Plants Archives Attention Wild Food Aficionados: Fall foraging forges forward, and by that alliteration I mean to say that foraging for wild food “has not yet ended” this fall, so don’t put away your scissors or your plastic knives or your bare hands just yet! Just yesterday I came across some fabulous fall dandelion greens in the Colorado high country despite its notoriously short growing season. They were growing amidst the deep, down-trodden grass at the base of willows lining an old mining road, and some were nearly as long as an arm! Up here, anywhere the miners and their mules once trod is a good place to look for dandelions. At the very least these early travelers toted the seeds along by accident. Continue reading Heads up, blog readers, especially those of you interested in wild edible plants–I have an exciting announcement to make! New Wild Food Girl site: What happens to the old content? In the meantime, thanks so much for reading and I hope to hear from you over at wildfoodgirl.com. -Erica ).

52 Plants In The Wild You Can Eat | Self-Sufficiency (Before It's News) (Read: Fully Charge an iPhone in the Sun in Less Than 2 Hours) Suntactics.com April 15, 2013 We all know our vegetables and fruits are safe to eat, but what about other wild edibles? Here are a few common North American goodies that are safe to eat if you find yourself stuck in the wild: Blackberries: Many wild berries are not safe to eat, it’s best to stay away from them. Dandelions: The easiest to recognize is the dandelion, in the spring they show their bright yellow buds. Asparagus: The vegetable that makes your pee smell funny grows in the wild in most of Europe and parts of North Africa, West Asia, and North America. Elderberries: An elderberry shrub can grow easily grow about 10 feet and yield tons of food, their leaf structure is usually 7 main leaves on a long stretched out stem, the leaves are long and round and the leaves themselves have jagged edges. Gooseberries: Mulberries: Mulberry leaves have two types, one spade shape and a 5 fingered leaf. Pine: Kudzu: Daylily:

Free Wild Plant Identification eCourse You are out in the forest and looking at the glorious plant life surrounding you. Whether you are a beginner and have never identified one plant, or a Botany professor at a university, you might appreciate this refreshingly simple approach to plant identification. I remember lovingly (and sometimes screamingly) that my college classes in Systematic Botany required me to become acquainted with that local Washington Flora that we plant dorks call “Hitchcock and Cronquist”. In addition, my observation skills as an ethnobotanist were refined , foraging for wild foods, fibers and medicine. What will I need? A combination of actual need for sustenance, curiosity and simple observation skills are almost all you need to start with plant identification. Wherever you are in this journey, the following activities and tips will add some elegant tools to your already blooming botanical basket. Meet a Plant Approach the plant of your choice and find a place to start.

Edibility of Plants The information on this page is presented in an older format. We have vastly expanded our edible plants information with far more information, and far more plants. You can find this information at our new site Wildcrafting.net Plants are valuable sources of food because they are widely available, easily procured, and, in the proper combinations, can meet all your nutritional needs. Absolutely identify plants before using them as food. Poison hemlock has killed people who mistook it for its relatives, wild carrots and wild parsnips. At times you may find yourself in a situation for which you could not plan. It is important to be able to recognize both cultivated and wild edible plants in a survival situation. Remember the following when collecting wild plants for food: Plants growing near homes and occupied buildings or along roadsides may have been sprayed with pesticides. Plant Identification The basic leaf margins (Figure 9-1) are toothed, lobed, and toothless or smooth. Seaweeds

Foraging Guide App. (Cheap) - Edible Wild Plants of Temperate N. America & the UK Now FREE!! Image page of the Rose profile. The Mobile Foraging Companion is a feature-laden, cross-platform guide for common wild and naturalised edible plants of temperate North America, and Britain and Northern Europe (there is a guide for each of those two areas, to suit your needs). Whether you forage on a leisurely weekend walk, want to know about that weed in the garden, or want to prepare for a potential survival situation, this guide is one of the handiest reference guides on foraging. It is designed for quick access to all the essential information you want at your fingertips, no more wading through long text to find the facts you are looking for. This unique guide packs a lot of information into a small space: What is the difference between the N. There isn't a lot of difference, as most of the plants included grow throughout most of the temperate northern hemisphere. Common names of plants vary, so each guide is written with the appropriate names for those countries. Advertising

Wild Food School - Urban Foraging Guide & eBooks Urban Foraging & Cornwall Forager Guides - FREE Foraging for food - even in a city - can be fun. But where do you start? This Foraging Guide is in PDF format and is designed to allow you to print out the pictures on standard 10 x 15 cm. photo paper and then bind them together (laminate the pages if you want). Correctly printed out you will find plant picture and text side by side like the example below. Click wfsURBFORAGER.pdf to downloador right click and Save. ** If you're more interested in dealing with food and water in disaster and emergency survival situations (also in urban areas) you might like to take a look at the new book Armageddon Kitchen and Doomsday Kitchen over on this page >>> ... There are also a 98 page TROPICAL FORAGING GUIDE [approx. 8Mb] plus the Cornish Foraging and a Riverside Foraging guide. See also the exciting range of Wild Food WISDOM Cooking with Weeds™ eBooks at wildfoodwisdom.co.uk Wild Food School Homepage

How To Find & Enjoy Wild Foods Lately I’ve been mining the Mother Earth News archive disks for bits of relevant wisdom—which are abundant there. James E. Churchill’s advice on foraging and preparing wild foods from one of the earliest issues, September/October 1970, couldn't be more timely right now. Free food is abundant—and could be growing between the cracks in your sidewalk! Chicory "Anyone who lives in the settled regions of the United States should be close enough to chicory to be able to gather all they want," Churchill wrote. In spring, trim tender chicory leaves before they are as tall as a tea cup. Boil the leaves a second time for five minutes. Blanched chicory leaves can be used for a salad and served with your favorite dressing, or they can be boiled like cabbage. To make braised chicory, thoroughly wash a pint of blanched leaves and put in a sauce pan with a half-inch of water in a saucepan. Chicory leaves are edible all during the growing season. You can also use chicory to make a coffee substitute. Mint

The Fantastic Four – 4 Essential Wild Edible Plants that May Just Save Your Life Did you realize that knowing just 4 wild edible plants could one day save your life? If there were any four categories of plants that I would recommend all people to know how to use and identify it would be these: Grass, Oak, Pine, and Cattail. For the knowledgeable survivor, knowing just these four plants can make the difference between life and death if stranded in the wilds – for each one is an excellent food source which can sustain you until help arrives. Throughout this week and part of the next, I’ll be going into details on how you can prepare and eat these plants. Grass Surprising to many is the fact that you can eat grass. The young shoots up to 6 inches tall can be eaten raw and the starchy base (usually white and at the bottom when you pluck it) can be eaten as a trail nibble. The best part of the grass plant to eat are the seed heads, which can be gathered to make millet for breads or filler for soups & stews. Oak Pine “You can eat pine?!” Cattail Conclusion

How To Eat Wild Foods & Not Get Poisoned (How-To) Let's play pretend for a moment. Are you with me? Let's pretend you can't go down to the supermarket for food to eat. In fact, let's pretend that there is not a supermarket for one hundred miles in any direction, and you don't have any food with you. Does this seem unlikely? What this guide is:This is a guide to wild things that are 100% safe to eat. What this guide is not:This is NOT a guide to figuring out if something may or may not be safe to eat. BerriesThis is very easy to make 100% foolproof. Unless you are completely sure, do not eat non-aggregate berries - berries that are shaped like blueberries or gooseberries. Green StuffMost "green stuff" is not outright toxic, but can definitely cause you some distress. Note: You should use caution when eating any plant, particularly plants found in the water - they can harbor any creepy crawly that may have been living in the water, including giardia cryptosporidium among others. CrittersNever eat wild critters raw!

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