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3 Words That Guarantee Failure

3 Words That Guarantee Failure
People who fail to achieve goals almost always signal their intent to fail by using three little words: "I will try..." There are no three words in the English language that are more deceptive, both to the person who says them and the person who hears them. People who say "I will try" have given themselves permission to fail. No matter what happens, they can always claim that they "tried." People who hear "I will try" and don't realize what it really means are fooling themselves, by thinking there's a chance that the speaker will actually succeed. People who really and truly achieve goals never say "I will try." Instead, they always say "I will do" something–or, better yet, "I must do" whatever the task is. As a wise (though fictional) guru once said: "Do, or do not.

http://www.inc.com/geoffrey-james/3-words-that-guarantee-failure.html

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Reinvent Your Career by Writing Your Own Narrative - Christopher Bowe by Christopher Bowe | 1:45 PM May 4, 2012 A topsy-turvy world like the one in which we live offers us tremendous opportunities. But to tap them, we must remove the barriers within ourselves. The crucial barriers are the ways we compartmentalize our experiences — keeping them uniquely bound to one kind of job or career.

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Cognitive Endurance Basics for Software Developers A few weeks ago Michael published a post called Product Software Development Is a Marathon. The message of this post is: if you want to come up with a decent product, you’ve got to brace yourself up for a long-distance marathon run. I agree to the point of long-distance and endurance, but I’d rather compare this not to a marathon but to a triathlon race. Triathlon requires diverse skills, you not only have to run, but to swim and to bike, and, as we know, good software developers need diverse skills, too.

What You Really Need to Apply for a Job—and What You Don't “An ideal candidate should have a strong marketing background, five years of experience in the consumer goods industry, a track record of designing and running complex marketing campaigns for new consumer products, proficiency with Adobe Creative Suite, and a graduate-level degree with a focus on marketing or public relations." How many times have you found your perfect job—and then taken a look at that list of requirements and decided there was just no way you could apply because you didn’t meet every one of the criteria they'd set out? Well, here’s a secret: You don’t really have to. Think of job descriptions as a hiring manager’s wish list for the ideal candidate, not as a list of non-negotiable requirements.

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