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3 Words That Guarantee Failure

3 Words That Guarantee Failure
People who fail to achieve goals almost always signal their intent to fail by using three little words: "I will try..." There are no three words in the English language that are more deceptive, both to the person who says them and the person who hears them. People who say "I will try" have given themselves permission to fail. No matter what happens, they can always claim that they "tried." People who hear "I will try" and don't realize what it really means are fooling themselves, by thinking there's a chance that the speaker will actually succeed. People who really and truly achieve goals never say "I will try." Instead, they always say "I will do" something–or, better yet, "I must do" whatever the task is. As a wise (though fictional) guru once said: "Do, or do not.

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