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8 Crucial Resources For Flipped Classrooms

8 Crucial Resources For Flipped Classrooms
Have you “flipped” yet? My colleagues have this week; it’s PSSA week in Pennsylvania (PSSAs are standardized tests.). That’s not the flipped I meant, however. I meant, have you flipped your classroom yet? Well, if you have or are thinking about it, here are some tools you might want to consider using for those after-hours background knowledge sessions. YouTube This might be the most popular tool teachers have used for flipped instruction. You don’t have to establish a class list to allow for student discussion. Other services, such as those that approximate a LMS, require a lot of preparation before a teacher can use it. You can edit the video online (somewhat). Evernote Tutorial as a Cartoon Trim and stabilize Swap audio tracks Change the look of the video (for instance, make it look like a cartoon) Add annotations Add captions Download the new version of the video for offline use It’s easy to share with colleagues, friends, and professional development organizations. Edmodo Schoology

http://edudemic.com/2012/03/8-crucial-resources-for-flipped-classrooms/

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Teaching Digital Natives: Partnering for Real Learning ShareThis Reading Teaching Digital Natives: Partnering for Real Learning by Marc Prensky was a fantastic experience. This book details the importance of real learning is our students. As a teacher, I am always looking to share connections with my students. I want them to ask, “Who cares about this topic?” I have a great answer.

FC: Myths vs. Reality Editor's Note: On the heels of our viral posts in over 100 countries about the flipped classroom earlier this year (links below), we asked Jon Bergmann if he could share some of the feedback he was receiving in light of the notable interest about this topic. The timing couldn't have been more perfect since he was about to leave for a conference about you-guessed-it, the flipped class. Here is Part 1 of our three part series The Daily Riff. See Part 2 and 3 links below. - C.J. Westerberg The Flipped Class: What it is and What it is Not

Flipped Classrooms — Tennessee Teaching and Learning Center by guest writer Karen Brinkley If asked to describe a traditional college classroom and style of pedagogy, most people would probably think of students who come to a classroom of chairs in rows to listen to a professor deliver a lecture, and who then did textbook readings and assignments at home. Yet those who have experienced a flipped classroom would describe something completely different. Flipping classrooms is a fairly recent and growing trend sweeping through classrooms across the country. And the name is pretty fitting. Five Best Practices for the Flipped Classroom Ok, I'll be honest. I get very nervous when I hear education reformists and politicians tout how "incredible" the flipped-classroom model, or how it will "solve" many of the problems of education. It doesn't solve anything. It is a great first step in reframing the role of the teacher in the classroom. It fosters the "guide on the side" mentality and role, rather than that of the "sage of the stage."

Mobile Consider some of the basic symbols of education in the United States: the textbook, the chalkboard, and the apple. Thanks to technological innovations and cultural forces, we’ve seen textbooks supplanted by videos and e-books, SMART Boards replace chalkboards, and the apple on the teacher’s desk pushed aside by the latest gadgets from, well, Apple. Just as our classrooms have changed significantly since the 1800s, so have our ideas about the purpose of schools. Our views on education were defined by John Dewey's theory, which states—and I'm simplifying—that the general purpose of school is to transfer knowledge and prepare young people to participate in America’s democratic society. But today's students live in a modern, global society that is interconnected as never before. As a result, Dewey's explanation of the purpose of schools now seems insular and inadequate.

Best Technology For FC Flipped classrooms may just be the future of education. Quite simply, they’re a setup where the teacher acts more like an adviser than a lecturer. It lets the students have a more hands-on approach to education. How the Flipped Classroom Is Radically Transforming Learning Editor's Note:Posts about the flipped class on The Daily Riff beginning in January 2011 have generated over 240,000 views to-date - thanks contributors and readers . . . See our other links related to the flipped class below this guest post. Since this post was written, Bergmann and Sams have released their book, Flip your Classroom: Reach Every Student in Every Class Every Day. Do check it out. - C.J. Goal of Flipped Class Videos: Content Delivery or Skill Development? It recently occurred to me that since I began flipping my world history course in January, each of my screencast lectures have had one overarching goal: content delivery. This has proven tremendously useful and the early results, considering both assessment scores and student feedback, are encouraging. Transitioning some of my direct instruction (content delivery through lecture) to video has helped students understand some of the major events and themes from world history, but I realized what I should shift my focus towards: building social studies skills! Since most of our class time is now spent working on such skills, I now have a better understanding of their ability to engage in such learning experiences.

Mobile Learning and the Inverted Classroom (#EDUSprint) Number four on my list of five types of mobile learning is the use of mobile devices (smart phones, tablets, and such) as platforms for delivery course content. Frankly, I find that educational technology people often focus too much on this type of mobile learning, and I’ve argued that mobile learning involves much more than just content delivery. So as I continue my #EDUSprint blog series on mobile learning, I’m hesitant to give too much attention to “mobile learning type 4.” However, I think I’ve got an angle on this topic that will add something useful to the conversation… I first heard about what some call the inverted classroom from Harvard physics professor Eric Mazur. He’s the one who coined the term peer instruction to describe a certain kind of in-class small group work that involves having students discuss and answer clicker questions.

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