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Dont Follow Your Passion, Follow Your Effort

Dont Follow Your Passion, Follow Your Effort
I hear it all the time from people. “I’m passionate about it.” “I’m not going to quit, It’s my passion”. Or I hear it as advice to students and others “Follow your passion”. What a bunch of BS. “Follow Your Passion” is easily the worst advice you could ever give or get. Why ? Think about all the things you have been passionate about in your life. If you really want to know where you destiny lies, look at where you apply your time. Time is the most valuable asset you don’t own. Let me make this as clear as possible 1. 2. 3. 4. Don’t follow your passions, follow your effort.

http://blogmaverick.com/2012/03/18/dont-follow-your-passion-follow-your-effort/

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To Find Happiness, Forget About Passion - Oliver Segovia by Oliver Segovia | 12:05 PM January 13, 2012 Several years ago, a friend decided she wanted to follow her passion. She loved the liberal arts and academe. She was a talented graphic designer, a great writer, and was the president of a student club. But the prospect of working a nine-to-five job was never interesting. I can’t blame her. Changing student thinking with SOLO I'm Kate Le Fever from St Andrews College in Christchurch and I'm head of biology and SOLO coordinator at the school. SOLO taxonomy stands for structured overview of learning outcomes and it's a way of giving students an understanding of the learning process to ensure they are able to gauge where they're at with their learning and what their next steps will be. It's got five different levels of understanding where a student can be at prestructural where they know nothing, moving through to unistructural and multistructural and then finally relational and extended abstract which means they can take their knowledge and apply it to a new situation. As SOLO coordinator I have been overseeing the roll out of SOLO at school. We started two years ago where all year nines in core science, social studies, English, and maths were exposed to SOLO using the hotmaps and self assessment rubrics.

Motivation, Bonuses and Open Source Let’s start with a few quick observations on money and motivation. Bonuses can be an easy and expensive way to demotivate staff just as to motivate them.Experiments consistently show that financial motivation can actually reduce performance particularly on tasks that require thinking … like programming.If money were the sole motivator then open source would not have transformed the world and society would lose the massive contributions made by other volunteers.But equally … unfair rewards and low salaries can switch off the mind of your team. So why do many organizations persist with financial bonuses as their core incentive? What’s the right balance of rewards? The surprising truth about motivation Dan Pink has done some entertaining, enlightening videos around the topic of motivation.

A Man. A Woman. Just Friends? There’s a history here, and it’s a surprisingly political one. Friendship between the sexes was more or less unknown in traditional society. Men and women occupied different spheres, and women were regarded as inferior in any case. A few epistolary friendships between monastics, a few relationships in literary and court circles, but beyond that, cross-sex friendship was as unthinkable in Western society as it still is in many cultures. Then came feminism — specifically, Mary Wollstonecraft, the mother of feminism, in the late 18th century.

Frequently Requested Resources The resources below are some of our most frequently requested and are provided for you here for easy access. This article is written by Art Costa and describes the 16 Habits of Mind. It is an excellent starting place for your work with HOM. Click on the image to download. Trying Not to Try: How to Cultivate the Paradoxical Art of Spontaneity Through the Chinese Concept of Wu-Wei by Maria Popova “Our modern conception of human excellence is too often impoverished, cold, and bloodless. Success does not always come from thinking more rigorously or striving harder.” “The best way to get approval is not to need it,” Hugh MacLeod memorably counseled. We now know that perfectionism kills creativity and excessive goal-setting limits our success rather than begetting it — all different manifestations of the same deeper paradox of the human condition, at once disconcerting and comforting, which Edward Slingerland, professor of Asian Studies and Embodied Cognition at the University of British Columbia and a renowned scholar of Chinese thought, explores in Trying Not to Try: The Art and Science of Spontaneity (public library | IndieBound). Our lives, Slingerland argues, are often like “a massive game of Mindball,” when we find ourselves continually caught in this loop of trying so hard that we stymie our own efforts.

How I Got Ripped At 500 Startups Editor’s note: Dick Talens is one of the founders of Fitocracy and an amateur competitive bodybuilder. Follow him on Twitter @DickTalens. Little sleep, lots of stress, free food at all hours, and Paul Singh constantly try to booze you under the table. Sounds like the old college days when you tried to rush for Sigma Chi, doesn’t it? But nope. That describes life at 500 Startups.

Integrating the 16 Habits of Mind In outcomes-based learning environments, we generally see three elements in play: 1) learning objectives or targets are created from given standards; 2) instruction of some kind is given; and then 3) learning results are assessed. These assessments offer data to inform the revision of further planned instruction. Rinse and repeat. But lost in this clinical sequence are the Habits of Mind that (often predictably) lead to success or failure in the mastery of given standards. In fact, it is not in the standards or assessments, but rather these personal habits where success or failure -- in academic terms -- actually begin.

America's young workers: Destined for failure? By Thomas A. Kochan Young and underemployed in America 11 Productivity Hacks From Successful Entrepreneurs This is part of the "Moving Forward" series offering advice to small business owners on technology, mentorship, productivity, and growth. "Moving Forward" is sponsored by Ink from Chase®. More posts in the series » Getty/Araya Diaz Dustin Moskovitz, cofounder of Facebook and cofounder/CEO of Asana, has "No Meeting Wednesdays."

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