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8,200+ Strong, Researchers Band Together To Force Science Journals To Open Access

8,200+ Strong, Researchers Band Together To Force Science Journals To Open Access
Evolutionary biologist Michael Eisen made this t-shirt design in support of the Elsevier boycott. Academic research is behind bars and an online boycott by 8,209 researchers (and counting) is seeking to set it free…well, more free than it has been. The boycott targets Elsevier, the publisher of popular journals like Cell and The Lancet, for its aggressive business practices, but opposition was electrified by Elsevier’s backing of a Congressional bill titled the Research Works Act (RWA). Though lesser known than the other high-profile, privacy-related bills SOPA and PIPA, the act was slated to reverse the Open Access Policy enacted by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in 2008 that granted the public free access to any article derived from NIH-funded research. But the fight for open access is just getting started. Seem dramatic? Paying a high price for academic journals isn’t anything new, but the events that unfolded surrounding the RWA was the straw that broke the camel’s back. Related:  Open Access PublishingDefending Free and Open Internet

Wellcome Trust will penalise scientists who don't embrace open access | Science The Wellcome Trust plans to withhold a portion of grant money from scientists who do not make the results of their work freely available to the public, in a move that will embolden supporters of the growing open access movement in science. In addition, any research papers that are not freely available will not be counted as part of a scientist's track record when Wellcome assesses any future applications for research funding. The trust is the second largest medical research charity in the world, spending more than £600m on science every year. Its director, Sir Mark Walport, is a firm supporter of open access to scientific research as a way to ensure scientific results are available to as wide a range of people who might benefit from them as possible. He has said that publishing research papers should be considered a cost of a research project in the same way as a piece of lab equipment. Future applications for research money or renewal of grants will also be affected.

The FNF – Free Information, Free Culture, Free Society NoodleTools : MLA / APA / Chicago Bibliography Composer, Notecards, Outlining Connexions - Sharing Knowledge and Building Communities The Internet Defense League - Protecting the Free Internet since 2012. Welcome to perspectivia.net — perspectivia.net Full text of "Guerilla Open Access Manifesto" Guerilla Open Access Manifesto Information is power. But like all power, there are those who want to keep it for themselves. The world's entire scientific and cultural heritage, published over centuries in books and journals, is increasingly being digitized and locked up by a handful of private corporations.

Open access Open access logo, originally designed by Public Library of Science. Whilst no official open access logo exists, organisations are free to select the logo style that best supports their visual language. Other logos are also in use. 9-minute video explaining open access Open access (OA) refers to online research outputs that are free of all restrictions on access (e.g. access tolls) and free of many restrictions on use (e.g. certain copyright and license restrictions).[1] Open access can be applied to all forms of published research output, including peer-reviewed and non peer-reviewed academic journal articles, conference papers, theses,[2] book chapters,[1] and monographs.[3] Definitions[edit] On the occasion of the tenth anniversary of the Budapest Open Access Initiative in 2012, Peter Suber is interviewed about his views on past, present and future developments in open access to scholarly publications The Budapest statement defined open access as follows: Gratis and libre OA[edit]

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